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Full text of "University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees records, 1836-2010"

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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
January 8, 1968, 10:00 a.m., Office of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay 
Associates, Watertown, Mass. 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; Trustees 
Crowley, Emerson, Gordon, Maginnis, Croce, 
Frechette, Treasurer Johnson. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chancellor Ryan, Dean Soutter, Planning 
Officer UM/B F. O'Brien; Messrs. K. E. 
Alexander and Chapman of Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay Associates, Inc. and Miss Coulter. 



The Chairman convened the meeting at 10:15 a.m. at the 
office of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates, Inc. in Watertown, 
Massachusetts . 

Chairman Haigis reported briefly on a meeting with Mr. 
Patrick Moynihan, Director, Harvard-MIT Joint Center of Urban Studie: 
on January 4, 1968. Those present at the meeting with Sasaki's 
staff included President Lederle, Chancellor Ryan, Trustee Haigis 
and Gordon, Treasurer Johnson, Mr. O'Brien, Dr. Gagnon and Mr. Starr 
Mr. Moynihan was enthusiastic about the project and volunteered to 
study the question of where UM/Boston should be located, and after 
consultation with city officials and others, to submit a report in 
about a month. 

Mr. K. E. Alexander of the staff of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay 
supplied to the members of the committee, analyses of UM/B fall 
(1967) enrollment, including area map which supplied background data 
showing where the students came from (see Document T68-040 attached), 
and an article from the New York Times entitled WHERE SHOULD YOU PUT 
A UNIVERSITY (December 31, 1967 issue). 

Chairman Haigis asked Mr. Alexander to review for the com- 
mittee the current status of the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston site search. By use of color slides as visual aids, he 
described areas under consideration which included the North Station, 
the Turnpike near Arlington and Dartmouth Streets, Columbia Point, 
West Roxbury, Highland Park and Allston. Discussion was augmented 
by reference to a series of area maps posted about the conference 
room, pertinent to the sections specifically described. 

Detailed discussion followed with emphasis on new material 
about certain sites. For example, it was suggested that a mainland 
area adjacent to Columbia Point might merit further investigation. 

Trustee Maginnis stressed that emphasis should be con- 
centrated on the availability of the various sites under considera- 
tion. Chairman Haigis advised that he and Chancellor Ryan have in- 
formed the Governor and the Mayor on the committee's considerations. 



3019 



UM/Boston 
Site 



3020 



COMMITTEE 



Medical 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The committee referred to a chart which outlined the 
possible time schedule for master planning, designing the first 
academic units and constructing the buildings, compared to the 
projected growth of enrollment at the UM/Boston. Planning Officer 
O'Brien distributed to the members present, material relative to 
the UM/Boston capital budgeting program. 

Dean Lamar Soutter, Dean of the Medical School, then pre- 
sented prints of the Medical School re-design. He stated that 
criticism made at the time the original application was rejected in 
Washington brought about the changes now incorporated in the sug- 
gested re-design of the Medical School. The Dean briefly summarized 
the critical comment, stating the Washington authorities felt the 
building was larger than they could support with federal grants, 
the amount of space allotted to faculty was larger than some other 
state schools (though less than Mt. Sinai for example), the outside 
of the structure appeared decorative for a state school, the pro- 
trusion of the student area and the library area should be simplified 
It was also said that the library design was inefficient (though 
there had been no previous comment about this during preliminary 
conferences) . The junction of the hospital with the Medical School 
was a principal cause of objection, feeling the faculty should not 
have to walk so far. Dean Soutter noted that the faculty concerned 
had not objected to this feature, since it put other areas in good 
relation to each other and minimized traffic - of patients to student 
area and auditorium area. 

The Dean described the alternatives in view of the 
rejection as 

(1) Alter the design to meet the objections 

or 

(2) Re-submit the application without changing the 
design 

If the second course were to be adopted, there is the possibility of 
further delay in receiving approval from the Washington sources. 
It was, therefore, felt advisable in the interest of obtaining the 
largest possible federal grant to adopt the first alternative and 
submit a re-designed plan for the school, although this created 
delay and caused considerable design expense. The Dean has attempted 
to receive assurance that a re-designed school, incorporating 
changes as indicated, would bring about the desired result, but has 
secured only an assurance that the design will receive consideration 
at the top level. The revised plans will be submitted later on this 
month in Washington to Dr. McKee, who is in charge of the Division 
of Physician Manpower. 

The Dean outlined the steps he had taken, including con- 
ference with the faculty on the reduced space to be allotted, and 
with the library personnel due to the need to abandon the T forma- 
tion of the library and revert to the rectangular shape; and the 
preparation of the prints for the December 22 meeting held in 
Washington, in order to satisfy the requirement for three alternate 
revisions of the plan. He then briefly sketched the result and 
effect of the re-design, which included elimination of the student 
cafeteria, the animal holding areas, one lecture hall and auditoriun 
and re-design of the exterior of the building in a more simple 
fashion. 



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COMMITTEE 



302 1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Dean, in response to committee question, stated his 
satisfaction with the final re-design, though some of the amenities 
had been eliminated. He said the architects report that there is a 
saving in this re-design, but architect planning and inflation may 
use this up. Dean Soutter stated he has been advised by Washington 
that the plan satisfies all purposes. 

Dean Soutter stated that the cost to redo the plans and 
resubmit the application will be approximately $175,000. He added 
there is no guarantee that federal money will result, since federal 
funds at present are entirely depleted and may continue to be for 
some time. He cited the example of the Department of Health and 
Education which had requested $175 million and received only $85 
million for distribution. 

Dean Soutter informed the committee that the state 
authorities, Commissioner DeFalco, Deputy Commissioner Shepard and 
Mr. Chase, have been consulted and informed of the full development. 
Commissioner DeFalco has authorized the architects to make revision 
of the plans for the resubmittal of the federal fund application by 
March 1, 1968. 

President Lederle indicated that although the re-design 
of the Medical School would presumably occasion a year's delay in 
completion of the building, bringing it up to 1972, it is still the 
intention of the administration to admit students to the Medical 
School program in 1970 as originally planned. He stated there will 
be students in the fall of 1970 and additional students in the fall 
of 1971, whether we are in the new school building or not. The 
recently acquired "Shaw" building in Worcester when renovated will 
be used to accommodate the program. 

Trustee Maginnis urged that the University requests be 
prusued with the highest level authorities. He was assured by 
President Lederle and Dean Soutter that proper preliminary pro- 
cedures had been followed and that every avenue explored, including 
securing the assistance and intercession of our Congressional 
delegation, as well as using the good offices of the State's repre- 
senative in Washington. 

There was further general discussion and suggestion as to 
courses of procedure to promote earliest favorable consideration by 
the federal authorities of the University application for federal 
funding for the Medical School in Worcester. Dean Soutter advised 
that it is planned that 16 students will be admitted in the fall of 
1970 and that it would be possible to hold classes for two years 
under these circumstances; hopefully the completed structure would 
be ready for occupancy at that time. 

Mr. Gordon expressed the desirability at some future date 
of having a full-time representative in Washington, as liaison for 
all University affairs. 



30 






COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Croce informed the committee that there seemed 
to be a somewhat general feeling in Worcester that the University 
was not energetically pursuing the establishment of the Medical 
School there. Dean Soutter expressed concern and stated that the 
Worcester legislators had worked with him and other University 
administrators and had met with Commissioner DeFalco and his staff 
on occasion, in a combined effort to expedite the entire program. 
After general discussion, the need was stressed for further and 
frequent communication, with the members of the Legislature as 
well as the general public, to apprise them of the continuing 
efforts of the University administration and the long and hard 
attention given to bringing this project to completion. 

Dean Soutter outlined the efforts and progress in pre- 
paring the recently acquired Shaw building for occupancy and 
immediate use. This building contains 44,000 square feet and in- 
cludes a large warehouse on the gru und floor as well as offices. 
The second floor is over only part of the first floor. Tenants 
include a Prudential insurance office (they will leave April 1) and 
Marathon Electric (single proprietor) who is also expected to leave 
July 1, and an organization representing 3,000 Boy Scouts (who have 
plans underway to vacate) . 

Considerable repair work will be required on the building 
including the electrical circuit, the roof and doors. In the mean- 
time, a sign has been erected identifying the building as THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS and directing that inquiries be 
addressed to the Dean. The Dean has also arranged for preparation 
of a sign which will identify the building as the nucleus of the 
UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCHOOL. These plans had the enthusiastic en- 
dorsement of all Trustees present. 

Dean Soutter advised that 30,000 books for the Medical 
School library are being processed in Amherst at the present time 
by his staff. This work is expected to be completed by June. In 
the meantime, beginning next week, the books, as completed, will be 
sent to Worcester where a subsidiary office of the Dean is now be- 
ing established. As of the first of July, it is expected the 
Dean's office will be permanently located there. 

The plans for the warehouse space, as outlined by Dean 
Soutter, include conversion into laboratories for students and 
faculty. The librarians will select space for their needs also. 
The nature of the structure is such the upper floors can only be 
used for offices. The building was officially acquired December 1, 
1967 and the Dean informed the committee the schedule at present 
is (1) to open the office officially July 1 (2) open the school 
September 1970. 

General discussion ensued and enthusiastic support given 
to early, if not immediate, establishment of the UM Medical School 
office in this building. Treasurer Johnson then submitted for 
consideration the approved set of preliminary plans and the need 
for authorization to restudy and resubmit the application for 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

federal funding. He assured the committee that Commissioner DeFalco 

and Mr. Chase of the BBC were fully informed of the current 

developments on the application. After discussion, motion 
was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of the Scheme 3, revised preliminary plans for 
the UM Medical School at Worcester in accord 
with plan and drawings on file in the Office 
of the Dean for submission with the revised 
application for federal funds. 

The meeting reverted to discussion of remodeling of the 
former Shaw building in Worcester to provide classrooms, labora- 
tories and offices. After full discussion, motion was made, 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Board recommend to the Commissioner of Ad- 
ministration and Finance that the architects 
now working on the Medical School also 
design the renovation of the Worcester build- 
ing and prepare it for occupancy. 

Treasurer Johnson informed the committee that three 
appraisals had been secured on the so-called Shaw building and that 
although title search had not yet been completed by counsel, pre- 
sumably Mr. S. Pearlman et al is the owner and negotiations had 
proceeded on that premise. Mr. Pearlman had unofficially expressed 
his willingness to accept a compromise figure within the range of 
Trustee policy and settle out of court, without delay, but refused 
to reduce this agreement to writing. After discussion, motion was 
made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees should 
a written offer of compromise be received 
from Mr. Pearlman that falls within the sug- 
gested settlement, the Board of Trustees will 
consider such offer. 

The meeting recessed for luncheon at 12:35 and reconvened 
at 1:00 p.m. 

The Treasurer circulated to the members of the committee 
copies of an up-to-date listing of designers who had made applica- 
tion to the Designer Selection Board, for design of the Life Science 
Building (copies attached) . He stated there still is opportunity 
for application. This building will be on the east side of the 
campus; will be the last of the campus core. The Treasurer stressed 
the importance of good, integrated design. He said the Campus 
Planning Committee has considered! this matter at length, due to its 
importance. This building, together with the building designed by 
Breuer, Stone and Roche will be the heart of the campus. Trustee 
Gordon said the tone has been created by world renowned architects 
and from this point on there should be some conformity. 



3023 



Architects 
Renovation 

Worcester 



Shaw 

Pinney 

Building 



Life 

Science 

Building 



3024 



COMMITTEE 



UM/ Boston 
Site 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



There was general discussion and suggestion. Recommenda- 
tions were made that Designers - The Architects Collaborative, 
Pei, Roche and Weese also be encouraged to submit applications for 
consideration to the Designer Selection Board. 

The meeting then returned to the discussion of agenda 
item (1) University of Massachusetts at Boston Site - specifically 
the capital planning feature. 

Chancellor Ryan said the four brochures distributed by 
Planning Officer O'Brien and the enlarged charts displayed on the 
walls were an attempt to project data - alternate courses of action 
for the next eight years' planning for Boston growth and develop- 
ment. The Chancellor then asked Planning Officer O'Brien to explain 
the detail. 

Mr. O'Brien supplied to the members of the committee four 
brochures entitled: 

1. PROJECTED ENROLLMENTS, SPACE REQUIREMENTS 
AND COSTS Fiscal years 1969-1975 UM/Boston 
(January 1968) 

2. BUILDING PROGRAM ENROLLMENTS 
Preliminary Estimates (December 1967) 

3. PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT UM/ BOSTON 
Outline of first steps for planning and de- 
velopment of buildings for new campus 
(October 1967) 

4. UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS /BOSTON OFFICE 
OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT 

(Requests for new positions) (July 19, 1967) 

He stated that the UM/Boston planning office currently is deeply 
involved in two major jobs: 

1. planning and development of the temporary 
structure 

2. planning and development of the permanent 
campus 

He summarized the scope of these programs and the need 
for staff to accomplish them. Attached diagrams showed the actions 
that must be taken to build a new University of Massachusetts/Bostoiji 
and also set out a table of organization of the Office of Planning 
and Development. The present schedule calls for opening the first 
group of new University buildings within five years to accommodate 
a total enrollment of about 15,000. This is a very extensive 
building program; it will require long hours by many people to get 
the program moving in the right direction. It will require ser- 
vices of educational and space planners, engineers, architects, 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

cost estimators and others including clerical, technical and 
managerial persons. 

Mr. O'Brien then referred to the wall chart which he 
described as an attempt to determine all of the work that must be 
done and determine the minimum time path and discover where it is 
possible to do things other than in series. He stressed that in 
order to achieve the desired opening schedule, the pattern and 
order must be accelerated and changed. The usual pattern followed 
in planning and construction will not get the job done on time. 

There was discussion. Chancellor Ryan asked for committee 
reaction to the alternates presented on the wall charts and said - 
we must realize we are under the gun to produce a site decision. 
The Chancellor said he would like to have the Trustees set a date 
to select a site that is realizable at that date and then vote to 
present the request that would encompass a plan for construction 
of the facility and capital outlay for it. He encouraged con- 
sideration of construction by a Building Authority type of approach 
to speed completion. He expressed confidence that the Legislature 
would approve of such a plan. 

The committee will continue to explore this question at 
its next meeting. 



Treasurer Johnson introduced discussion of the 
Fraternity-Sorority Park, Inc. whose letter of November 28, 1967 
to Dean Field has been supplied to the committee together with a 
copy of a memorandum from the Dean of Students. 

The Fraternity-Sorority Park group request affirmation 
by the University of support in principle for their endeavor, 
which is development of the Fraternity-Sorority Park and in addi- 
tion ask the Board to adopt a policy statement indicating Board 
support. In effect, this helps the fraternities to secure support 
of their nationals and to obtain outside financing of this venture. 
President Lederle noted this incurs no legal commitment and 
recommended that agreement in principle would be advisable also 
stating that the administration would use its best offices to see 
that these houses would be kept filled. He expressed the ad- 
ministration's interest in insuring that students live in first- 
class housing. 

Treasurer Johnson then reviewed the final plans for the 
Parking Garage. He submitted detailed plans to the committee for 
their consideration. He drew attention to various items, in- 
cluding that no finished grading had been provided for in the plans 
Discussion followed as to who would design the landscaping since 
it should include the entire area including the Campus Center, the 
library and surrounding buildings. Possible source and availa- 
bility of funds for this purpose also were discussed. 



O v J /w t 



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Fraternity- 
Sorority 
Park 



Parking 
Garage 



3026 



COMMITTEE 



Grading and 
Landscaping 

Garage 



Naming 

New 

Buildings 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Emerson suggested rough grading remain in the 
Parking Garage plans at this time in view of the ultimate need for 
an overall landscaping of the entire area. After discussion, it 
was the consensus the funds should be included in a Building 
Authority project and work must be completed in accord with a 
general overall design under design criteria set by Sasaki's office 
with each architect doing the design for his project. The site 
work and landscaping for the garage and Campus Center could be com- 
pleted later as a separate Building Authority contract under Project 
Eleven. 

The Treasurer described the entrance corridor which has 
bluestone floor and floor to ceiling mirror walls and stated that 
in the interest of economy, the elaborate (though attractive) decor 
is being changed by taking out the mirrors. Chairman Haigis re- 
gretted the budgetary necessity for this, but in accord with the re- 
maining members of the committee agreed. 

Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the final plans for the Parking Garage (as 
corrected) prepared by Marcel Breuer for 
the University Building Authority be approved. 

The Treasurer reminded the members of the committee that 
lists had been supplied, prior to the meeting, of the buildings on 
campus and their names, as well as a listing of suggested names for 
new buildings. He asked for comments and suggestions, as well as 
additions to this list. At the suggestion of Trustee Emerson, this 
matter was postponed for later discussion. 

The meeting was then adjourned at 2:40 p.m. 





Robert /J J McCartney 
Secretary, LiSoard of Trusts 




COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 



January 22, 1968, 11 00 a.m 
PRESENT 



Board Room, U of M, Amherst, Mass. 



Chairman Troy, President Lederle; Trustees 
Lambson, Maginnis, Plimpton, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 

PRESENT : Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Dean Soutter, 
Dean Gagnon, Miss Coulter. 

Chairman Troy convened the meeting and proceeded 
immediately to discussion of Selective Merit Increments. The Chair- 
man pointed out that the University is allowed in the state appro- 
priation 57o of the salary budget of the Professional Payroll for 
merit increases. He noted that this requires a sharp and clearly 
defined policy in support of the recommendations. The Chairman 
commended the completeness of the academic evaluation sheets and 
accompanying documentation, which had been supplied to the members 
of the committee in advance of the meeting. He suggested that more 
of this type of documentation would be useful also in the area of 
non-academic merit increases. 

Provost Tippo was invited to describe the process of 
allocating selective annual merit increments, promotions and tenure 
recommendations (as well as reappointments and terminations) . He 
outlined the various steps, which included recommendations from de- 
partment heads, chairmen and deans for the increments after con- 
sultation with their respective personnel committees. A standard 
Annual Faculty Evaluation Form is used. Emphasis was placed on the 
fact that the increments are intended to recognize outstanding ser- 
vice to the University in the teaching, research, public service 
fields. 

The Provost stated the entire evaluation process is a 
long and intensive one, covering a period of almost four months. 
The process begins in September at which time faculty members fill 
in forms titled ANNUAL FACULTY REPORT ON SCHOLARLY, PROFESSIONAL 
AND UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES for submission to the Department Head. 
After consideration and evaluation by the Department Head and his 
personnel committee, the form is then advanced with salary recom- 
mendation to the Dean. In turn, the Dean consults with his college 
committee and makes recommendations to the Provost. After thorough 
discussion and review by the Provost, the completed reports are 
submitted to the E-resident. (A sample file was supplied to the 
Trustees present for their perusal). The Provost summarized that 
any one of the decisions on salary was determined by at least a 
dozen persons, including committees, at various levels. 

Provost Tippo noted that reference is being made increas- 
ingly to various salary surveys. These include the AAUP Salary 
Study, a confidential survey by Booz, Allen and Hamilton and several 
others in special fields. 



302? 



Selective 

Merit 

Increments 



3028 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Ryan advised that much the same pattern des- 
cribed by the Provost for Amherst was followed in Boston. Preview 
within a department is made and then at a divisional level. Re- 
view is made at the departmental level by a committee and the 
recommendation is next reviewed by a divisional level committee. 
The recommendations are then advanced to the Dean and then to the 
Chancellor and the President. 

Criteria guiding merit increase decisions at Boston in- 
clude evidence of merit in teaching and research as well as service 
to the community and to the University. Consideration is given to 
individual equity on the salary position; effort is made to examine 
recommendations in terms of how they may relate to persons of the 
same rank who may be recruited in the future. An effort is made to 
determine the existence of response beyond the usual duties of 
faculty members. Also considered is whether the faculty member has 
been employed for a year and a half without a salary increase. 

The Provost, in response to Trustee Maginnis ' request, 
compared the system of awarding merit increments with that followed 
by similar institutions. He said almost all universities follow 
the pattern of recommendation by departments and Dean and most have 
personnel committees. However, we, perhaps, have developed more in 
the way of evaluation forms and other kinds of documentation. This 
approach is desirable because the University is a state institution 

Treasurer Johnson said that although forms are used for 
evaluation in non-academic positions also, the system differs from 
the academic since there are no organized committees involved in 
review. He said it is a continuing evaluation over a full year. 
In the area of Business and Finance, for example, each supervisor 
is consulted and makes his recommendation to the next level of 
supervisor until they reach the Treasurer's Office. The Treasurer 
discusses and reviews the evaluation with the supervisor. The 
Associate Treasurer and the Director of Personnel confer with him 
on the recommendations that are made. 

The Treasurer described a manual used in the physical 
plant area evaluation process. He explained how the scale is 
established against which the salary increment is measured. The 
Treasurer said, although University positions are usually very 
specialized and cannot be compared to any others in the state, his 
department is thoroughly cognizant of what the usual rates for 
similar jobs at the state level are and this is kept in mind in 
making recommendations. 

In addition to these considerations, the Treasurer 
advised salary studies are made from time to time by outside 
sources, by which the University salary structure is compared. The 
Heller study made last year, for example, showed that our salaries 
are low compared with other universities this size. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

At Chairman Troy's request, several categories of our 
University positions were checked in the Booz, Allen and Hamilton 
Survey, to determine how these positions ranked in scale against 
the ranges of increment and salaries in other universities in the 
nation. Our salary ranges in every case fell roughly midway be- 
tween the norms . 

The Provost drew attention to the relatively few (17) in- 
creases in the over two thousand dollar category and compared these 
to the ninety increases granted by Michigan in the over three 
thousand dollar category. He explained in detail why the large 
increases were necessary. 

There was discussion and comment of one over-ceiling 
salary in Amherst and four changes in the original listing as 
circulated (sheet #3), as well as one addition to the Boston listing 
occasioned by a promotion upon completion of requirements for a 
Ph.D. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the schedule of Selective 
Merit Increments and the increases contained 
therein, effective February 4, 1968 as con- 
tained in Document T68-044, which document is 
herewith attached to and made a part of these 
minutes . 

Discussion turned to approval of a list of salary ranges. 
Provost Tippo noted an error in the listing of "Head of Department" 
He asked that it be shown as $15,000 - $24,700 instead of $15,000 - 
$26,000. 



3029 



After discussion, motion was made and seconded, and it 



was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the maximum and minimum salary ranges shown 
in Document T68-042 be adopted. 

Chairman Troy commented on the list of promotions which 
had been supplied to the members of the committee in advance of the 
meeting. He stated these had been studied very carefully. After 
discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the list of recommended promotions as shown 
on attached Document T68-045 for Amherst be' 
approved, effective February 1, 1968 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the list of recommended promotions as shown 
on attached Document T68-046 for Boston be 
approved, effective February 1, 1968. 



Minimum - 
Maximum 
Salary Range 



Promotions 
UM/ Amherst 



Promotions 
UM/ Bos ton 



3030 



Policy 
Statement on 
Professional 
Personnel 

COMMITTEE 



Dental 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle advised that in order to give the 
faculty some assurance of orderly consideration, when the merit 
approach was established, a policy statement was developed on Pro- 
fessional Personnel Policies (Document 63-050 - November 9, 1962). 
It is now recommended that an addendum be attached to the afore- 
mentioned document, so that wherever this document refers to 
"Provost", in the case of the UM/Boston campus the word " Chancellor" 
. shall be read, and in the case of the Worcester campus, "Dean of 
the Medical School" shall be read. 

After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
an addendum be added to Document 63-050, 
dated November 9, 1962, entitled: BOARD OF 
TRUSTEES STATEMENT ON PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL 
POLICIES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS: 
to incorporate changes as noted in the 
attached revised version of the document. 

The meeting recessed for luncheon at 12:15 p.m. and re- 
convened at 1:20 p.m. 

Chairman Troy introduced discussion of the "Survey of 
Dental Health Needs and Manpower in Massachusetts in the Years 
Ahead" as prepared by Dr. Raymond J. Nagle for the Board of Higher 
Education of the Commonwealth. This report has been supplied to 
the members of the Board of Trustees by Chancellor Millard of the 
Board of Higher Education. Dean Soutter described Dr. Nagle as one 
of the senior people in dental education in the country and very 
highly respected. The report will be presented to the Dental 
Association by Dr. Nagle on January 28. The report recommends that 
a dental school be established under the University of Massachusetts. 
stating that the need is urgent because increasing population and 
growing demand for dental health care presented the real possi- 
bility of a public health crisis in dental care by 1975-80. 

Dean Soutter reported on his conversations with Dr. Nagle 
and stated that the design of the Medical School would readily 
allow for inclusion of a dental school. It would be practical to 
consider this now while the required extra space could still be in- 
corporated into the original Medical School plans. The Dean said it 
would be a great advantage to have the dental school with the 
hospital in terms of attracting faculty. Incorporation of the 
dental school would also prove less expensive since the same 
laboratories could be used at alternate scheduled times. This 
would also be possible with other facilities, he said, and would 
represent a considerable saving to the Commonwealth. 

Discussion was held as to whether incorporating the 
dental school in the current Medical School plan would further 
delay completion of the Medical School, since federal matching 
funds for the dental school would have to come from an entirely 
different source. Dean Soutter stated he has been advised by the 



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COMMITTEE 



303 1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

architect that shell space (for less than $20 a square foot, as 
compared to $34 for finished space) could be considered and added 
as extra floors onto the medical structure. The dental school 
could be ready to proceed before the building was in fact completed. 
Perhaps a small class of dental students could be included with the 
medical students in the Shaw building. It was concluded that no 
delay would be involved. 

Dean Soutter stated that a possible candidate for Dean of 
a Dental School has seen the plans of the Medical School in 
Worcester and stated they are excellent for dentistry. 

Chairman Troy stated that certainly the need for a dental 
school is spelled out in the report supplied by the Board of Higher 
Education. Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To inform the Trustees that it is the 

opinion of the Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy that the Nagle Report 
to the Board of Higher Education has 
clearly demonstrated the need for establish- 
ment of a state dental school in the Common- 
wealth and to recommend to the Trustees that 
the University of Massachusetts will proceed 
to establish such a school in conjunction 
with the Medical School in Worcester, if so 
directed by the Legislature and the Governor. 

Trustee Plimpton expressed his concern about the overall 
organizational structure in Worcester if a dental school and 
possibly a nursing school are to be added to University Medical 
School responsibilities. President Lederle stated this warrants 
consideration. With the Medical School in Worcester, physically 
separate from the Amherst campus, it might be preferable for the 
President to deal with one person, possibly a Vice President for 
the Worcester Schools, much as he deals with a Chancellor in Boston 
rather than, have Deans of the several University schools report to 
him. 

The President said that when the University moves into 
major construction in Boston, there must be a Boston planning staff. 
Once a site is picked, manpower to plan and supervise construction 
will become critical. 



The meeting was adjourned at 2 




Robert/ J. McCartney 
Secretary , Board of Trus 



3032 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston 
Site 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
January 26, 1968, 10:00 a.m., Conference Room, UM/Boston 



I 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Crowley, Emerson, 
Gordon, Maginnis, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



Chancellor Ryan, Dean Gagnon, Planning 
Officer O'Brien, Mr. K. E. Alexander 
of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates 
and Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 10:30 a.m. with 
a review of site considerations for location of the permanent 
campus of the University of Massachusetts at Boston. 

Chancellor Ryan, Dean Gagnon and Planning Officer O'Brien 
briefly outlined the results of recent conversations with Mr. 
Moynihan, Director, Harvard-MIT Joint Center of Urban Studies and 
Mr. Riesman. It was reported that Mr. Moynihan and Mr. Riesman had 
met with Mr. Slater of the John Hancock Insurance Company and Mr. 
Hale Champion new director of the BRA. Mr. Moynihan was scheduled 
to be at today's meeting but was delayed in New York. 

Mr. Champion felt that a further check of Columbia Point 
as a site was necessary. Mr. Slater indicated certain additional 
site possibilities including a continuance of the present location 
at Park Square, and extending along Columbus Avenue east and south. 

In addition to the formal investigation, Mr. O'Brien 
advised that members of the faculty and students of UM/Boston had 
held a meeting with the Mayor who recommended their consideration 
of a second priority site. 

Chairman Haigis urged the committee to move ahead with an 
in-depth study of the Dorchester Bay area. He pointed out that 
current planning is for 15,000 students, but the future may involve 
30 - 40,000 students. In this event, a site such as Copley-Turn- 
pike area might have serious limitations as space would be confined 
to the original 15,000 students planned. 

Mr. O'Brien circulated a photograph of a model of the 
proposed World's Fair. Discussion ensued as to effect this would 
have on the availability of property in the Dorchester Bay area if 
the plans for the fair were approved and effectuated. Other 
factors which would need to be resolved include availability of 
land now owned by the Boston Globe; also, the Boston College High 
School. In addition, a new transit station would be necessary. 



COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Chancellor has conferred with the World's Fair group to de- 
termine the present state of their plans. He stated if the Uni- 
versity has an interest in Columbia Point, then plans for Univer- 
sity use of this land must change to fit in with those of the 
builders of the Fair. Mr. O'Brien felt that the University pro- 
posal would be helpful to the Fair and the combined need of the 
University and the World's Fair for transit would improve the 
possibility of obtaining improved transit facilities. 

Chancellor Ryan stressed the need for prompt and thorough 
exploration of the availability of entire area under consideration 
to insure transit and water access. An integrated campus would hav 
to be planned within the area defined on the charts as displayed. 

Trustee Maginnis proposed re-consideration of the Highland 
Park site. Planning Officer O'Brien stated that, in view of the 
numbers of people who would be displaced, a negative attitude in 
City Hall and the recent inclusion of the area in a model cities 
program, the Highland Park area had not been under recent considera 
tion. 

Trustee Maginnis felt that further consideration should 
be given to this location, including discussion with the new Mayor 
of Boston and his staff. 

Chairman Haigis summarized that further consideration 
should be pinpointed on three locations: 

Park Square - Copley 
Dorchester Bay - Columbia Point 
Highland Park 

Discussion ensued and it was decided in the interest of 
expediency to ask Mr. Moynihan to make an independent site visit 
and formulate an opinion report without delay. It was further de- 
cided to meet to discuss the result of this survey on Tuesday 
evening, January 30, in advance of the meeting of the Board of 
Trustees to be held on Wednesday in Boston. 

Chancellor Ryan noted the desirability of discussion with 
the Speaker of the House, prior to the Tuesday meeting, to secure 
his views. 

The Chairman then introduced discussion of the Capital 
Outlay Program for the University at Boston. He referred to the 
detailed material supplied to the committee at its previous meeting 
and stressed the need for an expanded planning and development 
staff. The need is now, he said, both in terms of carrying out 
planning and development for the 2,600 student campus Boston now 
has and must maintain over a temporary period; also the staff 
members that will be required in connection with development of the 
permanent campus. We should proceed with all dispatch to recruit 
and hire the necessary staff, he stated. 



3033 



Capital 
Outlay 

Program - 
UM/ Boston 



3034 



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Office of 
Planning & 
Development 
UM/ Bos ton 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Treasurer Johnson explained that all physical planning 
that has been done to date has been carried on by the Amherst staff. 
Now, in view of the tremendous job to be done building the new, 
permanent Boston campus, a staff for this specific purpose is 
necessary. He said, however, a good deal depends on what kind of 
arrangements are made to build the campus - for example whether it 
is to be a total University built or an Authority built campus. 

The Treasurer said, in any event, guidance would be 
supplied from Amherst to the staff in Boston since they would be 
entirely new. The Amherst staff will carry on with planning for 
Amherst and Worcester, and is deeply involved in this now. 
Treasurer Johnson said in the event it was considered advisable to 
have only one centralized staff, the staff in Amherst could be 
augmented. It was the recommendation of Treasurer Johnson and 
Chancellor Ryan, however, that a complete new planning staff for the 
specific needs of the Boston campus be established in Boston. It 
was the consensus of the meeting that this was desirable. 

Treasurer Johnson stated the first step toward establish' 
ing this vital Office of Planning and Development for Boston is to 
secure funds from the Legislature. None were allocated. He pointed 
out that, under present conditions, with final site and plans for 
construction in a state of fluctuation, it would be difficult to 

j. the sums needed. The Treasurer explained that if an 
Authority were to build, as compared to adopting the urban renewal 
plan, there would be an entirely different set of requirements for 
staff. 

After further general discussion, on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
adoption of the following statement: 

The Board anticipates that the 
University of Massachusetts at 
Boston will develop a Planning 
and Development Staff for its 
present and future development 
and planning needs. 

Chancellor Ryan stated there will be continuing liaison. 
This isnecessary and will be maintained. 

There was discussion of three alternate projections for 
the University of Massachusetts/Boston. In order to develop a 
potential campus, there are two possibilities: 

1. Capital outlay appropriation by Legislature, 
including an exemption clause exempting (the 
university) from BBC 

or 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



2. Existing Building Authority approach 
(the present one or newly constituted 
one) with ability to issue bonds, with 
a new feature, possibly a lease-back 
system by the state. 

Chancellor Ryan expressed the hope that at the time the 
recommendation for site is made, there would be incorporated a 
statement on the proposed procedure for financing growth and de- 
velopment of UM at Boston. 

The Treasurer advised that Counsel Broadhurst has stated 
it is not possible for the Building Authority to build and then 
lease to the Commonwealth; what the Authority builds, it must 
operate. General discussion followed. The matter was left that 
the Treasurer would explore possibilities further with counsel. 

Chairman Haigis then moved to consideration of the list- 
ing of architects for the Life Science Building (U68-4) (R) . The 
Treasurer reported on the results of his communication with the 
four additional designers whom he had been directed by the 
committee to encourage to submit applications to the Designer Se- 
lection Board. I. M. Pei, Weese and Roche were unable to submit 
applications (two due to insufficient advance time and one because 
of a comparable design already contracted for). The fourth, The 
Architects Collaborative, stated they had already applied. 

The manner of procedure was discussed and Treasurer 
Johnson said the Designer Selection Board may meet within the week 
The order of preference of the Trustees should be communicated to 
them without delay. He noted that he has represented the Univer- 
sity with the DSB, but suggested the possibility of a Trustee 
assuming this function. 

There was general discussion and review of the listing 
as a result of which motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they recommend to the Designer Selection 
Board for their consideration the follow- 
ing designers, in order of choice, for de- 
sign of the Life Science Building of the 
University of Massachusetts. 

1. Marcel Breuer & Associates 

2. The Architects Collaborative, Inc. 

3. Vincent G. Kling & Associates 

4. Deeter, Ritchie, Sippel 

The Treasurer then displayed a model of the proposed 
Residence Halls for 1970 as prepared by the Office of John Carl 
Warnecke for the U of M Building Authority, and described the 
overall concept and feasibility °f the plans. The interiors are 



30 



35 



Life 

Science 

Building 



Designer 

Selection 

Board 



Residence 

Halls 

1970 



3086 



COMMITTEE 



Room 
Rents 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

arranged in a suite plan around a common living room, with a bath 
for each suite. In terms of the total project, there is an 
allowance of 210 sq. ft. per student. The suites are designed with 
movable closets and wardrobes which can be slid or rearranged into 
different positions in the room, depending on need or preference. 

The Treasurer stressed that the model represents only a 
feasibility study to see if it is possible and practical to put 1400 
students in the area inside the northeast residential hall group. 
Some of the students have petitioned that they would like to keep 
this area of campus open. However, in the design, much has been 
accomplished in concentrating all traffic in the center. The ex- 
terior will be brick, similar to that already in use. Consideration 
is being given to the use of a new giant interior brick. 

Chairman Haigis stated that the residents of these halls 
will dine at North Commons. This will save building another dining 
hall at this time. The Treasurer noted that building costs are 
rapidly increasing. The cost is estimated at $8,860,000 plus 
financing, etc. which comes to a rough total of nine million dollars 
It is expected that the buildings will be occupied in September, 
1970. Room rents must then be increased, possibly to $550, in order 
to achieve amortization. 

Treasurer Johnson stated that in the fall of 1968, it will 
be necessary to advance room rents, which currently are $350. The 
dormitories now under construction will also have to be included in 
this advance in rate. This is due, he said, to a rise in con- 
struction costs and interest rates. At present interest rates (now 
4%7°) , it will require $550 to amortize and maintain the structures 
by the fall of 1970. The Treasurer stated that a saving of $550,000 
might be effected by building outside the proposed area and erecting 
a more pedestrian building. However, this also would have the dis- 
advantage of the added cost of bringing in utilities to the site. 

A possibly undesirable factor, the Treasurer noted, is 
limited public lounge areas. There are some public lounges through 
out the structure. Trustees Maginnis and Haigis expressed mis- 
givings about this arrangement. The Treasurer assured the committee 
that the plans were still fluid. The possibility of including addi- 
tional guest areas is under advisement. 

In response to Trustee Gordon's question, Treasurer 
Johnson said the 1970 Residence Halls were not to be used as a 
residence college. They will, however, provide a different type of 
living unit than we now have elsewhere on campus. The suite 
arrangement is excellent in most respects, since it gives a small 
group identity. Also, it provides opportunity to study in the in- 
dividual rooms or in the living room. The buildings are arranged 
in a cluster design with four low houses and three towers 13 or 14 
stories tall. 



\ 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was discussion concerning the advantages and dis- 
advantages of space usage; also, the number and placement of tele- 
phones. The suite living room should not be considered as an 
entertaining area. It was pointed out again that the present model 
is merely a feasibility study and not a final design. The main 
question is - does the University wish to build in this location? 



After thorough discussion, motion was made, seconded, 



and it was 



VOTED : 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees to 
accept the feasibility plan for the Resi- 
dence Halls for 1970 as prepared by John 
Carl Warnecke for the UM Building Authority. 



The Treasurer then displayed the final plans for the 
Campus Boulevard in Amherst as prepared by the Sasaki Office. He 
described, by use of blueprints, the construction of the Boulevard 
from the Southwest Area near Berkshire House across campus to North 
Pleasant Street between the Newman Center and the Baptist Church. 
The Treasurer said the project will include completion of the mall 
east of Whitmore Administration Building including all lighting, 
landscaping, trees, sidewalks and curbing. It is hoped to finish 
the entire project depending on sufficiency of funds. 

Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
acceptance of the Final Plans for the 
Campus Boulevard - Amherst. 

Chairman Haigis called for "other business." Treasurer 
Johnson then submitted to the committee a letter (which will be 
kept on file in the office of the Treasurer) confirming a conversa- 
tion with Mr. Pearlman with reference to the acquisition of the so- 
called Shaw Building in Worcester. Although final determination 
of owner is still in process, the offer to settle is at hand and th 
matter is in the hands of the Attorney General. This matter will 
be submitted to the Trustees at their meeting on January 31. 

The Treasurer then advised that the State Nurseries are 
on farm land of the University. Some years ago they were re- 
quested to move but have not done so. We are now beginning a fill- 
ing operation in this area and the College of Agriculture needs 
this land and asks that they be removed. 

Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they request the Department of 
Natural Resources to move the state 
nurseries from their present location 
on University property. 



303? 



Residence 
Halls for 
1970 - 
Feasibility 
Plan 



Campus 
Boulevard 



Shaw 

Pinney 

Building 



State 
Nursery 



303S 



COMMITTEE 



Stockbridge 
Road 



Bartlett East 

and 
Bartlett West 

names 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was discussion as to whether the aforementioned 
nurseries should be offered land elsewhere. It was left that the 
Treasurer would investigate the need, with the possibility of allow- 
ing the use of University property in Belchertown or South Deerfield 

Treasurer Johnson then described a situation relative to 
North Pleasant Street which arose from the Faculty Campus Master 
Planning Committee. The committee suggested reopening Stockbridge 
Road to traffic to eliminate the necessity for building over North 
Pleasant Street when the Life Science Building is constructed. 
There was general discussion. It was the consensus that since 
Stockbridge Road is a better route with fewer students crossing it, 
this should be taken up with the Town. It could serve as a re- 
routing of North Pleasant Street until another satisfactory by-pass 
of the campus is in being. 

The meeting recessed for luncheon at 1:03 p.m. 

The meeting reconvened to discuss the naming of various 
University buildings. Motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the new building referred to as 
"Bartlett East" be named for CHRISTIAN 
ARCHIBALD HERTER and the building now 
designed and referred to as "Bartlett 
West" be named for MAURICE JOSEPH 
TOBIN. 

President Lederle submitted the possibility at some future 
time of naming certain dormitories after late, distinguished pro- 
fessors. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:35 p.m. 



\^x^_jtiiy± t<v 



Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, iBpard of Trustees/ 




1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL 

POLICY 

January 31, 1968, 11:00 a.m., Chancellor's Conference Room, 

UM/ Boston 

PRESENT : Trustees Haigis, Kiernan, Lambson, 
Lyons, Maginnis, Plimpton, Rowland; 
Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Acting Dean Gagnon. 



In the absence of the Chairman, the meeting was called 
to order at 11:15 a.m. by chairman pro tern Lyons. 

Trustee Lyons invited Acting Dean Gagnon to present the 
sole agenda item, "New Courses, UM at Boston." Back-up material 
on each proposed course having been circulated to the members of 
the committee, Acting Dean Gagnon supplied a summary sheet listing 
a total of 24 new courses proposed to be offered at the University 
of Massachusetts at Boston during the spring term, 1968. The 
summary indicated that the course descriptions would be edited for 
style and consistency prior to inclusion in the catalogue. 
Reference was also made to "Summary Sheet #2," listing the total 
number of course offerings for the academic year 1967-68 at the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston. The total for all divisions 
was 272. 

After brief, general discussion, in which it was brought 
out that the probably future for course offerings in such exotic 
areas as Canadian Studies, La tin- American Studies, African Studies, 
etc. would lie in the area of cooperation between various institu- 
tions, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they approve the listing of new 
courses in the Humanities and Social 
Sciences proposed to be offered at the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston 
during the spring term, 1968, as de- 
tailed in Documents T68-048 and T68-049. 

Trustee Lambson expressed the opinion that a more precise 
definition of the term "social" should be made in the course 
description for Economics 247. It was his opinion that the term 
"governmental" or "public" should be used to describe this balance 
between private and non-private capital in a mixed economy, rather 
than the word "social." 



The meeting was adjourn. 




Robert/ J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



New 

Courses 
UM/ Boston 



3040 



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UM/ Boston 
Site 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
January 30, 1968, 7:00 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Emerson, Gordon, 
Maginnis, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chancellor Ryan, Acting Dean Gagnon, 
Planning Officer O'Brien, Messrs. 
Moynihan and Riesman (Harvard-MIT 
Joint Center of Urban Studies) , Miss 
Coulter. 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting, stating that the 
purpose was consideration of the most favorable location for the UM 
at Boston campus. 

The Chairman introduced Professors Moynihan and Riesman 
to the committee describing their interest in the University, and 
specifically in the location of the planned UM/Boston campus. He 
then turned the meeting over to Mr. Moynihan. 

With frequent reference to Mr. Riesman for concurrence, 
Mr. Moynihan described the various steps taken in the evolution of 
their opinion of a site compatible with the requirements. They 
visited the office of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates and viewed 
the full range of possibilities under consideration by the Board of 
Trustees as points of preferment. They were provided a memorandum 
of such sites, prepared by Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay. Mr. Moynihan 
said, "it is our understanding that the issue most before us is the 
possibility of the Copley site. This is a site that was clearly of 
great interest to the Trustees, to the University itself; a site 
which the faculty and students of the University wanted and which 
evoked most explicitly the idea and concept of an urban university." 
It had an important advantage of being available to those families 
in the city of Boston that did not have means to send their children 
away to school (commuter students). After several meetings, the 
objections to this site were clarified as: 

1 . Boston Redevelopment Authority had opposed 
it on the basis of the John Hancock plans 
for development in the area. 

2. The Back Bay Association had objected be- 
cause of the anticipated additional influx of 
students in the area. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Messrs. Riesman and Moynihan conferred with the Boston 
Redevelopment Authority which, since the original decision, has a 
new Director, to see whether the earlier BRA decision was final or 
could be reopened. The conference was an agreeable one. The BRA 
was also trying to solve the problem. 

Mr. Riesman said the BRA had been very committed to the 
Columbia Point locale. After viewing Columbia Point, Messrs. 
Moynihan and Riesman felt that there was a great deal of charm to 
it, but 

1. It is not an urban site 

2. It is not a site where there is anything 
"very elegant existing" 

The feasibility of Columbia Point depends heavily on the 
possibility of a World's Fair being held. Plans for the Fair would 
include improved rapid transit, and extension of other facilities. 
However, the consultants felt that absolute reliance on the possi- 
bility that Boston would obtain the World's Fair involved unduly 
optimistic hope. Other cities, including Philadelphia, also have 
submitted strong bids to be considered for this Fair. In view of 
the President's State of the Union message which noted that 1976 
will be the nation's 200th anniversary, it is not unlikely that the 
"Cradle of Liberty," Philadelphia, will be a strong contender. 

Mr. Moynihan then described a luncheon meeting with 
Mr. Slater, President of the John Hancock Insurance Company, to 
determine his viewpoint on location of the UM at Boston campus. 
Mr. Slater explained the plans of his company and made some 
suggestions. It was clear that the original Sasaki site and the 
proposed John Hancock development were in conflict. 

Mr. Moynihan said that at this point, entirely on their 
own, the BRA began to reconsider the possibilities of site loca- 
tion in Boston. Last week Messrs. Riesman and Moynihan met with 
Mr. Hale Champion, the new director of the BRA. Interim possi- 
bility of three available sites were considered: 

1. Columbia Point 

2. The Campus High School site (This would 
be built in conjunction with the new high 
school to be erected near (at) Madison 
Park. Mr. O'Brien did not find much 
attraction in this; neither did Messrs. 
Moynihan and Riesman. .. .the location would 
be over a highway and would present serious 
grade problems) 

3. Proposal from BRA to modify the original 
Sasaki site at Turnpike-Interchange into a 
new location. Mr. Moynihan indicated on a 
wall sketch the area under discussion. 



304 



3042 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Moynihan stated that this was not a final suggestion; 
but the BRA will consider it in much greater detail and more 
serious concern, if the Trustees indicate their interest. Mayor 
White is aware that this possibility is being explored. Mr. Moyni- 
han indicated on the map (copy attached to these minutes) the exact 
parcels under discussion. 

The great advantage to this area is the fact that four 
parcels are now completely clear; a fifth parcel is a deteriorating 
industrial area with very little use. Mr. Moynihan said there is no 
one living on these parcels and no one is making any money on them; 
also existing structures are scheduled to be taken down by BRA. 

Discussion was held as to the boundaries and uses of the 
immediate property under discussion as well as surrounding fringe 
areas. The BRA was described as not at all unresponsive to extend- 
ing over the boundaries. 

The consultants said this area encompasses about 16.8 
acres narrowly defined; extended it would be about 20 acres. Some 
of the advantages include: 

1. You are at the very center of the trans- 
portation system of the metropolitan area. 

2. There is access not only for day students, 
but also for evening students or adult 
classes. 

3. This would be an urban university within 
walking distance of a negro community. 
The most underprivileged citizens in the 
city could walk to the newest and finest 
institution. 

4. Students and faculty would be provided 
with immediate access to the urbanity of 
the city. 

5. This can all be done without turning a 
single person out of a residence; also 
there would be almost no demolition and 
practically no dislocation. 

Mr. Riesman stated this site would accommodate 15,000 stu- 
dents, plus 7,000 adults in evening classes. He pointed out this 
would not present an impossible load for public transport, nor for 
the public highways, nor would it deluge the area with students. 

Mr. Moynihan stressed that he and Dr. Riesman do not speak 
for all of the persons consulted, but they feel if the Trustees 
should indicate that this site is what they would like, such a 

response would have major bearing on an affirmative decision. 



II 



COMMITTEE 



I 



1 



3043 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Moynihan added, however, that all sources consulted 
want this University. It will become the largest institution in 
the new Boston. 

There was general discussion and examination of the possi 
bilities of the area. Trustee Maginnis questioned why this had 
been referred to as the Copley site, when in fact it was not. The 
meeting concurred and agreed to refer to the newly outlined site as 
the Turnpike site. 

There was discussion as to whether 15,000 students could 
be accommodated on the 15-16 acres described as available. 
Chancellor Ryan agreed to prepare a survey. 

Chairman Haigis noted that all potential sites have been 
carefully reviewed in accord with instruction from the Governor. 
Now, the BRA's willingness to discuss the Turnpike site is probably 
the answer. He said that an urban university should be part and 
parcel of the city and not apart from it. 

Trustee Gordon asked Dr. Riesman if there were another 
site that the committee should be considering and Dr. Riesman 
responded negatively, if a true urban university is desired. 

There was discussion of payment in lieu of taxes on a 
turnpike site. Planning Officer O'Brien stated that under existing 
legislation such payments should be relatively low, unless it is 
possible to construe air rights as land. Mr. Riesman stated that 
this subject had been raised by the BRA. He expressed the view that 
the University proposal would be more sound than the merely vague 
and temporary bids of developers. 

In response to Trustee Maginnis 1 question as to second or 
alternate suggestions, Dr. Riesman said there were none. The other 
sites are not truly urban. Dr. Moynihan observed that this would 
be a real addition to the assessed value of the city. 

Dr. Moynihan advised that the Chairman of the Boston Re- 
development Authority would like to be advised of Trustee interest 
in the turnpike site so that further consideration could begin from 
that point on. 

Planning Officer O'Brien stated, if the turnpike site 
were to be considered, that it would be an eminent domain project, 
since urban renewal takes a great deal longer. 

President Lederle said he believed in an urban university 
serving a community at night as well as in the daytime, but this 
site seemed small, although there did not seem to be any other. 
The President recommended that a feasibility study be made by 
Sasaki, Dawson and DeMay and consideration also given by Dean 
Belluschi as to the practicality of this 15-acre site in terms of 
accommodating 15,000 students. 



3044 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was agreed to advise the Board of Trustees at the 
meeting of January 31 that consideration is being given to the 
alternate 15-16 acre Turnpike site proposed to us by the BRA, con- 
sistent with the previously adopted policy of establishing an urban 
university. 

It was also agreed to contact the BRA and advise them of 
the results of this informal meeting, so that the possibilities may 
be further explored. It was also agreed, between February 1-9 to 
contact appropriate government and legislative officials to keep 
them informed. 

The President expressed the hope that models and some plan 
could be ready for the Trustees at their February 19 meeting. 

It was left that Chairman Haigis would report to the Board 
of Trustees at the meeting of January 31 that the alternate or 
Turnpike site will be explored. If satisfactory preliminary 
discussions are held, a full exposition will be submitted at the 
February meeting of the Board. 

It was noted that it will doubtless be necessary to con- 
tinue occupying the space presently under lease by UM at Boston. 

The meeting was adjourned at 8:50 p.m. 




Robert 
Secretary, 




McCartney 
)ard of Trustee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

January 31, 1968, 11:00 a.m., Parlor C, Statler Hilton 

Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Pumphret, President Lederle; 
Trustees Frechette, Gordon, Lambson, 
Treasurer Johnson. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Chancellor Ryan, Counsel Austin Broad- 
hurst, Miss Coulter. 

Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting with a discussion 
of Federal Fund reporting. He expressed concern at what appeared 
to be a widely held misconception, particularly with the Legisla- 
ture, of the use of Federal Grant funds, and stressed the need for 
public clarification. He commended a letter in which the Dean of 
the Graduate School responded to a newspaper critic. This latter 
pointed out that no faculty member of the University earns money 
from any federal research grant during any of the time he is paid 
to work for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Treasurer Johnson observed that the State Auditor's re- 
port in 1965 listed every grant and every salary paid out of it, 
with a complete breakdown. President Lederle said that although 
these things are standardized and entirely in accord with practices 
in effect at other universities throughout the county, there is an 
apparent need for a perpetual education policy. 

In order to clarify misconceptions about the use of 
federal grants for research, it was decided to request an opinion 
from the Attorney General of the Commonwealth. 

Attorney Austin Broadhurst discussed this request with 
the committee and described the steps taken in preparation for it. 
He said that after examining every grant which the University re- 
ceived in fiscal 1967, and the regulations and statutes under which 
the various grants were received, a request for an opinion was pre 
pared. The National Science Foundation was used as an example in 
the request, as the statute under which such grants are made is 
representative of the language in the federal law and thus was con- 
sidered appropriate. It is expected that the Attorney General's 
office will express a definitive opinion as to the nature of these 
monies and then, it is hoped, there will be a meeting of minds with 
the members of the Legislature, the Governor and the Auditor. 

The committee unanimously expressed its interest in 
seeing that information is made available to the Legislature in 
any form of report desired. President Lederle said if the Legis- 
lature will indicate what kind of report they wish, we will furnish 
it. There is no need for legislation to accomplish this result. 



3045 



Federal 

Grant 

Funds 



3046 



Budget 
Transfers 



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UM/ Boston 
Trust Fund 
Account 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The next agenda item was Budget Transfers. Treasurer 
Johnson informed the committee that due to the fact there were no 
supplemental appropriations this year, and in order to continue 
vital university operations until a deficiency appropriation is re- 
ceived, certain transfers between subsidiary accounts were necessary 
These were primarily payroll transfers, which he fully explained and 
described. 

The Treasurer stated a deficiency exists in University 
Operating Accounts. This has never happened in the past, but is now 
the only way to keep classes going and also supply the essential 
maintenance services. The transfers detailed on Document T68-050 
are attached to and made a part of these minutes. 

After discussion and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of Fiscal Year 1968 Budget 
Transfers between subsidiary accounts 
in the operating budget as shown on 
Document T68-050. 

Treasurer Johnson advised that in order to expedite cer- 
tain transactions and to provide authorization for the Chancellor 
to sign certain documents for the Boston campus which currently 
are forwarded to Amherst and then re-forwarded, an imprest fund is 
needed. After describing the nature of the fund and on motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that they establish a Trust Fund account 
and a bank checking account in the State 
Street Bank and Trust Company, both en- 
titled, "Student Activities Trust Fund - 
University of Massachusetts, Boston" on 
an imprest basis, the amount and account- 
ing therefore to be determined by the 
Treasurer of the University; and to 
authorize the Chancellor, University of 
Massachusetts, Boston, to sign checks for 
disbursement from this account and/or to 
designate a member of his professional 
staff, after notification to the Treasurer, 
to draw and sign checks payable from the 
above account, provided that checks drawn 
in excess of $1,000.00 are to be counter- 
signed by the Chancellor. Also, to authorize 
the Chancellor to enter into and sign con- 
tracts or agreements pertaining to the above 
Student Activities Trust Fund account and/or 
to designate from time to time members of 
his professional staff to do the same. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Treasurer informed the committee that a donor, who 
wishes to remain anonymous, has given 25 shares of Minneapolis 
Honeywell stock to the University to be used for a scholarship. 
On the advice of investment counsel, this will be sold and the pro- 
ceeds (approximate market value of $2,531.00) established as a 
scholarship fund. The committee expressed its appreciation of the 
generosity of the donor. 

Treasurer Johnson advised that the Attorney for the 
Codding Estate had been in communication with him, with reference 
to an unpaid legal bill of the estate which the bank in Stamford 
had inadvertently not paid. Since the sum received by the Univer- 
sity was intended to be the balance left after payment of debts, 
it was agreed to diminish the sum received by the amount of the 
bill as indicated. Thereupon on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the principal of the Codding Endowment Fund 
be reduced by the sum of $564.00 in favor 
of paying legal expenses that were unpaid 
in error upon settlement of the Estate by 
the Fairfield County Trust Company. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:19 p.m. 




Robert 
Secretary, 



lcCartney 
ird of Trustees 




3047 



Gift for 
Scholarship 



Codding 
Estate 



3048 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
February 6, 1968, 2:00 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Vice Chairman Healey, President 
Lederle; Trustees Emerson, Haigis, 
Pumphret, Troy, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Acting Dean Gagnon, 
Dean Soutter, Dean Redfern, Miss 
Coulter. 



Pending the arrival of Acting Chairman Healey, Trustee 
Pumphret was elected Chairman pro tern. Informal discussion was 
held on the University's salary structure. General approbation was 
accorded to the presentation of support material for recently 
awarded academic merit increments. These followed a clearly defined 
policy and were substantiated by extensive detail, including evalua 
tion sheets and other documentation. The Provost agreed to indi- 
cate also, in the future those increases which reflected an actual 
promotion. 

The President said the professional non-academic positions 
would be kept under continuing review. 

Trustee Troy also expressed satisfaction with the documen- 
tation. He raised the question of ranges on non-academic pro- 
fessional positions. The Treasurer explained that where only one 
person is in a job, a range has not been set. He said the job was 
classified in the salary range applicable at that time. He agreed 
that he would like to think that some of these positions are topping 
out. He referred, however, to two confidential salary surveys 
supplied to the members of the committee: - The first was "Ten 
State Universities - New England" and the second, a survey done by 
Booz, Allen and Hamilton, Inc. Both surveys clearly showed that 
non-academic professional positions at the University were well 
within range and mostly very close to the average or median salary 
for specific positions. 

The President next informed the committee that Trustee 
Rowland had communicated to him her concern with the continuing 
antagonistic attacks of a newspaper columnist against the University 
and other educational institutions in the Commonwealth. It was 
pointed out that the columnist had been hostile to the University 
for many years. An informal decision was made on a course of action 
to deal with this matter. 

Discussion shifted to consideration of the Master Plan. 
It was the consensus that the master plan should include recommenda- 
tion as to what should be the ideal role of the Amherst campus, the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Boston campus and Worcester campus, particularly in relation to 
numbers of future students and graduate students in each location. 
It was agreed that when these plans have been sufficiently formed s 
members of the administration should confer with the Governor, the 
legislature and the Board of Higher Education in order to come to 
agreement, so that the necessary funds can be provided. 

Trustee Pumphret said the plan should reflect: (1) where 
we are going (2) what are the goals. He made reference to a re- 
cent speech of the President of the United States in which it was 
said, 50% of high school graduates now hope to attend college. 
The President hoped to accelerate the figure to 66% by means of 
providing scholarships. It is very important for the University 
to plan now the facilities for increasing enrollment which will re- 
sult from this enormous expansion of interest in education at the 
university level. 



chair. 



Trustee Healey then joined the meeting and assumed the 



Copies of the proposed master plan having been supplied 



to the Executive Committee in advance of the meeting, the Vice 
Chairman asked Dean Redfern to describe for the committee the plan 
of the project. 

Dean Redfern stated that drafts were supplied to the 
committee to determine whether the Task Force was going in the 
proper direction, and also to secure approval in principle of the 
material put together to date. Dean Redfern explained the concepts 
of "sections" which will provide flexibility in the assembling of 
data. 

Discussion followed and some suggestions were made for 
revision of various sections. The Dean has agreed to make the 
changes indicated. 

It was noted that draft material from UM at Boston has 
not yet been received, and this material is vital to the prepara- 
tion of the plan. 

The meeting advanced to discussion of CAPITAL OUTLAY 
NEEDS. The Dean of Administration informed the committee that 
Planning Officer Littlefield had prepared the data submitted. He 
noted that it starts with an allocation base of 200 square feet per 
student. He said if this is acceptable, then it becomes a 
relatively simple matter to project enrollment. It was noted that 
the chart attached to and supplied with the preliminary draft is 
auxiliary material only and not intended to be used in this form 
in the final presentation. 



3049 



Proposed 

Master 

Plan 



Capital 

Outlay 

Needs 



3050 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After discussion, agreement was reached and the type of 
approach in projecting future Capital Outlay needs was approved. 
It was stressed that all projections should be completely accurate. 

The Chairman suggested consideration of an appropriate 
title for the document (rather than "master plan") should be found. 

Dean Redfern stated it is expected to have some guidelines 
in terms of fiscal projections, at the next session, as well as a 
draft for some new concepts in University organization. 

Provost Tippo stated the draft of the master plan had also 
been scrutinized and approved in principle by members of the faculty 

Chairman Healey strongly urged that the final document be 
available for distribution to the Legislature before the summer 
recess. Also, the critical need for a continuing close liaison with 
the members of the Legislature was stressed. 

It was also stated that early announcement of the UM/Boston 
permanent site was vital. General discussion was held on the curren 
status of these plans. 

Trustee Emerson proposed that an additional meeting be 
held to consider further the salary structure submitted by the 
Treasurer. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:45 p.m. 




Secretary^ ,Board of Trustees 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



II 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
February 13, 1968, 11:00 a.m., Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Lyons, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Gordon, McNamara. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Dean Field, Dr. Joyce 
Berkman, Dr. George Goddard, Pro- 
fessor Donald Maynard, Miss Frances 
Boronski, Mr. James Collins, Mr. 
George Moser, Miss Susan Tracy, 
Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Lyons convened the meeting at 11:40 a.m. He in- 
vited the Dean of Students to introduce the representatives of the 
Faculty Senate Committee on Student Affairs to the committee and 
outlined the proposal to be discussed informally. 

Dean Field Reviewed briefly the open house procedure at 
the University. He stated this procedure was formalized two years 
ago. A committee composed of students, faculty and administration 
prepared a liberal proposal which allowed a great deal of house 
autonomy, which the Student Senate has recommended. This year the 
Student Affairs Committee of the Faculty Senate has prepared with 
two reports (See Senate Document #68-009A) , one of which relies 
heavily on the responsibility of each residence hall to choose how 
many "open houses" they would like per month, thus granting each 
house broad autonomy. The second report, which is the minority 
view, suggests limitation of "open houses" to four a month. This 
matter is now in debate on campus. The Faculty Senate referred the 
report back to the committee to "obtain legal advice" and to "file 
a spectrum of reports," in time for the Faculty Senate meeting to 
be held Thursday, February 15. The report is ready and will be 
resubmitted. A copy of the special report of the Faculty Senate 
Committee on Student Affairs entitled "Open House Policy 
Recommendations" (Senate Document #68-009A) was supplied to the 
Trustees in advance of today's committee meeting. 

Chairman Lyons asked for comments on the majority and 
minority reports. 

Mr. Collins, President of the Student Senate spoke for 
the majority report. He stated that a year ago last fall the stu- 
dent government came to grips with the problem of residence halls 
on campus, feeling that the benefits derived from residence hall 
living should complement the classroom experience, and also should 
develop sensitivity to other students. This resulted in the 
recommendation for autonomy for residence halls. That proposal was 
routed to the Student Life Committee, which unanimously endorsed it 



305 



3052 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Student Affairs committee has been working on this, the project 
of their work is the proposal at hand. Mr. Collins stated that the 
students felt that solutions should be worked out cooperatively. 
Hence, the committee was combined with the faculty. 

Basically the proposal is the "majority report," which 
will provide the students with a comfortable living arrangement, 
Mr. Collins said. It also provides an environment which would allow 
them to become sensitive to others with whom they shared accommoda- 
tions. This would have a maturing effect that would insure students 
leaving the university as men and women, advanced academically. 
Hopefully, it would add to their development in other dimensions. 

Professor Maynard spoke for the minority view. He ex- 
pressed the concern felt by this group that the rather sweeping 
changes may be too great a step all at once. He cited an example of 
a survey conducted last spring which showed that four open houses 
conducted last year engendered only a small amount of participation 
generally. Of the males, 43% participated in: 32% of the females 
participated. He said this sweeping change from a fixed number of 
open houses to a number determined by student vote is a giant step 
all at once. The minority tends to favor a moderate rather than a 
large number of open houses. He stated there was a unanimous vote 
on the existing policy. There is also unanimity on the need for 
change. But the matter of degree is in dispute. Professor Maynard 
stated this indicates that some change is in order, but the kind of 
change is unable to be interpreted. 

There was discussion of the actual intent and meaning of 
the term "open house." Mr. Collins emphasized that the Student 
Government is not saying they want to have open houses seven days a 
week. They are saying they believe they are adult enough to decide. 
He said it is an effort to make residence halls not simply dormi- 
tories, but residence areas in the real sense of the word. 

It was brought out that, except for the President, every 
member of the Trustee Committee on Student Activities (also Provost 
Tippo) is an alumnus of the University, and thus quite conversant 
with student life on the Amherst campus. 

General discussion followed, in which many facets of the 
proposal were explored. This included clarification of the term 
and purpose of "open house." It developed that the greater thrust 
is for establishing visiting hours and the right of students to de- 
termine how many social events, rather than increasing the numbers 
of social events. On a burgeoning campus, the advantages of visitin 
within the limits set forth were stressed, including joint study 
sessions. It was also noted that the proposal makes provision for 
bi-weekly review by the residence units and that a majority of resi 
dents in such units determines policy. Question was raised as to 
practicality of voting on this question every two weeks. It was 
said that this also would develop student maturity. Although this 
is a sweeping change, it was stated that the protections (requirement 



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] 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of absolute majority and review bi-weekly) placed around the pro- 
posal will provide sufficient safeguards. 

A premise was offered that students in college are not 
exposed to natural adult responsibilities: the normal situation 
of having to make difficult moral choices for example. Dormitory 
life shelters students from these decisions. Conversion of dormi- 
tories into "normal" residences would develop maturity. Chairman 
Lyons stated that many agree with this philosophy, but considera- 
tion should be given, for example, to very young girls who are en- 
titled to certain social protections. Dr. Berkman responded that 
in assuming responsibility one becomes responsible. She added that 
it would be absolutely crucial that a parents' information sheet be 
distributed to inform parents if the proposal becomes actual policy 

Trustee Brown questioned the responsibility of students 
who create damage to university property. He cited examples of 
vandalism to buildings, elevators, fire house equipment, etc. He 
stated, although doubtless these acts are perpetrated by a 
minority, the very fact of the occurrence makes consideration of 
overall responsibility questionable. Added to this, the re- 
luctance of fellow students to report, or in some other fashion, 
to handle the situation, is a further indication of lack of 
assumption of responsibility by students. 

Senate President Collins agreed it is only a small 
minority of students who destruct their surroundings. He stated 
that, in his estimation, they do not belong at the University. He 
described the judicial structures set up in the student body to 
deal with such matters. Chairman Lyons said: "We are happy about 
the extent of the increasing involvement and responsibility of 
students. " 

Mr. Collins declared that, since President Lederle took 
office, there have been many changes. One is that the people in 
residence halls have taken on responsibility. He reiterated his 
confidence in the judiciary system and stated there is respect for 
this system throughout the campus. Mr. Collins felt the mechanism 
is there and it is strong enough to handle any infraction. 

The general problem of damage was discussed. Trustee 
Gordon commented that if the students begin to accept this kind of 
responsibility, then other responsibility would be given freely. 
He discussed the hard work and great effort in a great variety of 
areas extended to provide the fine accommodations enjoyed by the 
students and said it is most distressing to see acts of vandalism. 

Mr. Collins agreed that the University and the State have 
every right to e^iect that if the students ask for freedom they 
must demonstrate they can handle it. He stressed that 99% of the 
students do not believe in destroying their surroundings. He 
pointed to improved conditions in specific areas on campus. He 
further described certain equipment breakdowns as related to 



3053 



3054 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



equipment defects, rather than student misuse. In the case of the 
Southwest Tower elevators, for example, investigation has revealed 
a solution to frequent breakdowns. A fact sheet will be prepared 
for distribution to student users in order to prevent overloading 
and other inadvertent misuse. 

Trustee Brown, from his own past experience in the Legis- 
lature, described the strenuous efforts of the elected representa- 
tives toward the improvement and growth of the University, and the 
disheartening effect of hearing only demands for more funds and an 
increasing recital of student problems. He questioned whether the 
students in reality understood their responsibility to the state - 
to the citizens and taxpayers - to their Legislature. 

Mr. Collins expressed confidence that the student body in 
general was aware of the acute budgetary problems and the benefits 
they enjoyed in the state university. He questioned whether the 
majority should be deprived of benefits because of a minority of 
vandals. He felt there was some question as to whether the minority 
could be straightened out, or whether they should be asked to leave 
the University. Mr. Collins felt the students had demonstrated 
their capability, soundness and sense of responsibility in many ways 
including, for example cooperation in developing the picketing code 
recently established. 

Chairman Lyons next asked Miss Boronski, a member of the 
Student Senate, residence hall counsellor, and committee member, to 
comment. She endorsed Mr. Collins' statements, noting that although 
generally the women's role is a more passive one, they endorse the 
principle of freedom to decide. 

Discussion ensued as to the benefits expected from an ex- 
tended open house policy. Miss Tracy held that, as a whole, the 
group supported the theory of the proposal, on the basis of student 
autonomy and student responsibility. She concurred with Miss 
Boronski that women students would probably not have as many open 
houses, because traditionally it is the man's role to initiate the 
recreational activity. 

Reverting to the discussion on vandalism, Dean Field 
stated that no women's house and no residence groups as a whole 
suffered from serious vandalism. This problem has existed only in 
five residence halls. Strangely, the very newness and glamour of 
the new Southwest seem to attract a disproportionate number of peopl^ 
who want to destroy. 

There was discussion of the "open door" vs the "door ajar" 
policy. Miss Tracy described the former as probably open wide 
enough for one or more persons to pass through and the latter as 
"open a crack": for example - a door with a chain lock could still 
be ajar, but locked. 



I 



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li 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Discussion was held of the probability of distraction 
and noise caused by open house visitors. Mr. Collins said the 
student's right to study is a primary concern and that this should 
be written into the discipline code. In addition, the student's 
right to privacy should also be protected, and would be, by the 
door ajar policy. Mr. Moser described the quiet hours established 
for most houses and said infractions are dealt with through ju- 
diciary action. 

Provost Tippo referred to the excessive noise and horse- 
play problem commonly observed in residence halls. He questioned 
why such problems are not taken up by student government. Mr. 
Collins suggested a comparison between last year and the current 
year would show a substantial improvement. 

Trustee Gordon expressed concern at the problem of 
changing from study room to social room; and also the legal 
problem, as delineated in the opinion written by Counsel Broadhurst 
(copy attached) . Discussion followed on provision D of the 
Majority Report "Ultimate authority for open house policy resides 
in the Board of Trustees or their designated officials," as re- 
lated to Counsel's statement on delegation of authority: "approval 
by the Trustees of the proposed policy would violate section 3a of 
ch. 75 inasmuch as the policy would empower some body or person 
other than the Trustees to adopt, amend or repeal rules and regula- 
tions for the student." 

Dr. Goddard stated he did not feel that open houses add 
anything to academic discipline; at least they are not the primary 
purpose for attending a university. Students attend a university 
to get an education. He did not question the responsibility of 
students, but felt they were reluctant to exercise it by enforce- 
ment of such things as quiet hours; the use of alcohol in dorms 
(as evidenced by cans scattered about); also, some residence halls 
have indicated that, whether or not an open door policy is passed, 
they intend to keep the doors closed in direct violation of 
Trustee authority. With reference to the polls conducted, it is 
possible to find students not in favor of open houses -- those who 
have no interest either way. Dr. Goddard has urged the faculty to 
poll classes and invite comments from their students. He drew 
attention to the question on the minority report which asked: how 
often would you like to have open houses? The men said 20 times 
per semester; the women said 10. He pointed out that the minority 
report provides up to 4 a month, which is an average of 15-16 a 
semester. 

Provost Tippo urged moderation. President Lederle de- 
plored the lack of independent thinking. We talk about independent 
thinking, he said, but in practice there is a tendency to go as 
far as possible. He stated he once had the opinion that even one 
house might say decline open houses. Now he feels it is unlikely 
this will ever happen. 



3055 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Senate President Collins pointed to the revised curfew 
system and stated it has worked very well. The students have acted 
very responsibly with this additional freedom. Also there have been 
beneficial effects in his opinion. The women's residences have less 
traffic congestion at curfew time and there is more order and quiet. 

General and candid discussion was held on the parents' 
view of the open house policy. It was generally agreed that the 
manner of presentation would greatly affect their attitude. Also a 
major factor would be the difference in attitude between girls' 
parents and boys' parents. Trustee Gordon explained that great 
responsibility reposed in the Trustees. They must consider public 
reaction. The Provost emphasized the necessity and practicality of 
consulting the parents. It was the view of Mr. Collins and Miss 
Boronski as President and Vice President of the Student Senate, 
that properly informed parents would evidence little concern. 

Trustee Gordon indicated that, regardless of the immediate 
Trustee viewpoint, if the general public were alienated or offended 
by this recommendation, it would have the effect of depriving the 
University of some of its longer range goals. 

Dean Field stated unless the maximum of the policy were 
clearly defined, and unless the parents were informed that a staff 
member would be present in the building during the open hours, the 
policy would not be acceptable to them. 

Trustee Gordon considered whether stating the policy in 
the official catalogue would, in effect, put prospective students on 
notice. They could then elect to come to the University under those 
conditions or not, as they wished. Mr. Collins likened this to the 
Harvard small rule book, but felt it was in effect limiting freedom 
of choice to establish the policy in this manner. He said the pro- 
posal, as it now stands, sets limits. A majority must be present 
and have clearly defined limits. 

An exchange of view was held on prescribing the open house 
hours rather than holding frequent meetings. This would also bring 
about a certain amount of lobbying. Trustee Gordon felt the latter 
was a burden to students. They would then be spending more time on 
student government than anything else. President Collins felt it 
was an advantage since it put the time-consuming aspect on a house 
level. He stated if any such liberalization goes through, it is so 
valuable as a house form that it ought to be held in the house level 
for vote; it helps to strengthen the house government. Mr. Collins 
said this would be a step toward the desired decentralization. 
Dean Field concurred. 

Consideration was then directed to the cost of the pro- 
posal. It was pointed out that supervision, security guards, addi- 
tional hours, etc. would create additional expense. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Dean Field stated it would involve no staff change. He 
added, however, that one could not expect staff members to be 
present seven nights a week, in addition to their usual duties. 
Mr. Collins stated no increase in cost is envisioned. The present 
heads of residence and other staff normally present should be ade- 
quate. He said the students are careful to take others into con- 
sideration and would not impose an additional burden on a staff 
member by voting an open house if inconvenient for the house staff. 

Provost Tippo pointed out that where there is an in- 
crease in activities, in functions, there will be an increase in 
cost. He said someone has to pay the bill; it cannot come from the 
academic budget and therefore the students should pay it. He 
questioned whether this facet had been considered by the students. 

Chairman Lyons said that cost is a factor in any social 
program that is acceptable to the University, such as ushers at a 
football game, programs, other necessary services. But in whatever 
program is finally approved, one should not impose additional cost 
on the students. 

Provost Tippo reiterated that before adopting a program, 
it is imperative to know in advance what the cost will be. 

There was further extended discussion of the cost. It 
was conceded that if the students and graduate students who work as 
counsellors had to increase their working schedule due to the 
frequency of open houses, they might expect additional compensation 
and thus increase costs. Dean Field observed it is impossible to 
say, unless the frequency of open houses can be determined. Miss 
Tracy said people active in student government would be there and 
they are unpaid. Mr. Collins stated the policy should not be put 
into effect if it will require a staff, that people should be 
utilized who are there anyway and would merely continue to work. 

The Provost regretted that consideration had not been ex- 
tended to a gradual change, involving first the senior class and 
then .the junior class and so on. He stressed again the need to 
know the cost of the program before adopting it. Mr. Collins 
suggested adding to the majority report that no increase in cost 
is expected. 

Discussion moved on to consideration of whether, in 
attempting to humanize the growing university, conflict would re- 
sult through the broadened uses of residences. Mr. Collins cited 
the experience of "the towers" in this respect and described Mr. 
Hunt's formula of establishing quiet hours during the time when 
English classes were being held. He said the nature of the house 
government is such they are quite sympathetic and expressed the 
opinion that it would be unlikely there would be parties during the 
week, just visiting between rooms. Miss Boronski pointed out that 
this very factor conditions the students voting. 



\n^ 



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Trustee McNamara emphasized the- need for responsible be- 
havior. He cited a recent special edition of the Collegian which 
could alienate and thus diminish the support of certain members of 
the Legislature. He said the Trustees of the University feel an 
obligation to furnish the students with the finest facilities, 
finest courses and best teachers. Sacrifices are made to insure 
this kind of program and facilities, and then careless or irresponsi 
ble behavior creates a climate that -- erroneously or not -- reflect^ 
a negative image of the campus. He cited also as an example a 
letter forwarded to him from a constituent's son, lauding the Uni- 
versity but cautioning against sending a younger sister there 
apparently because of the, social standards. Miss Tracy responded 
to this by stating the University community is so large that, like 
any other community, one can find what he is looking for. This 
establishes his own level. 

Everyone having had an opportunity to speak, Chairman 
Lyons summarized that there seemed to be agreement on general 
principle; that it is necessary to live within accepted social 
standards and patterns of behavior that are conventional, to a 
point. He stated if all the members of the student government are 
as sensible and rational as the representatives present at the meet- 
ing, it would appear the intent is not essentially different than 
it has been. He expressed the need to exercise judgment, which in- 
cludes consideration of parents. He suggested incorporating the 
principle that implementation of the open house policy does not mean 
the granting of unlimited freedom, but, rather, within institutional 
regulations as stated in the minority opinion in the proposal. 

Chairman Lyons said that, in a public institution, we must 
realize that we always have the responsibility to adopt what are 
accepted standards of conduct and behavior. We have to operate 
within this kind of pattern. There must be some kind of acceptance 
to the community we live in. 

Chairman Lyons said the majority had spoken very reasonably 
about the proposal and expressed the hope that the meeting with the 
Faculty Senate on Thursday would result in a workable program. He 
expressed his pleasure at the kind of spirit and attitude shown. 
He said, however, he did not believe there was anything the Trustees 
there could do, other than direct attention to the matters sharply 
questioned. 

Mr. Collins, President of the Student Senate, expressed 
appreciation for the opportunity extended by the Trustees to meet 
with them. He said he did not believe the Trustees should approve 
any policy they did not consider in the interest of the students. 
He said what is in the interest of ,the student should be in the in- 
terest of the state and of the Legislature. He expressed the stu- 
dent interest in providing opportunity for graduates to leave the 
campus as men and women with a full sense of responsibility. He 



3059 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

advised that in a further effort to make the students aware of the 
problems of the Legislature and the legislators cognizant of the 
maturity and serious purpose of the students on campus, plans have 
been formed to invite members of the Legislature to the Amherst 
campus during March. 



The meeting was adjourned at 2:30 p.m. 





Robe 
Secreta 



J. McCartney 
Board of Trust 



I 



I 



3060 



COMMITTEE 



Tenure 
UM/ Amherst 
UM/ Boston 



Policy on 

Compensation 

for Certain 

Additional 

Professional 

Services 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

March 6, 1968, 11:00 a.m., Whitmore Administration Building, 

Amherst 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Troy, President LederleJ 
Trustees Haigis, Lambson, Lyons, 
Rowland, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Acting Dean Gagnon, 
Miss Coulter, Assistant to Provost 
Venman, Dean Spielman, Professors 
Fleischmann, Wagner, Zube, Lawall, 
Gibson, Dean Bischoff. 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 11:00 a.m. 

Tenure recommendations for the University at Amherst and 
Boston were submitted. Provost Tippo stated that these are the re- 
sult of a rigorous selection process and are in accord with 
established tenure policy. Acting Dean Gagnon described the 
recommended appointments to tenure for members of the Boston faculty 
noting that these had been approved by the appropriate department 
and divisional committees. 



and it was 



VOTED: 



After further discussion, motion was made and seconded, 



I 



I 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
tenure be granted to the members of the 
Amherst and Boston faculties as shown on 
attached lists. (Documents T68-058 and 
T68-059) 



The Provost submitted a proposed change in the policy on 
additional compensation. The original policy, established 
January 16, 1963 (Document 63-062) authorized faculty members to 
earn additional compensation from sponsored research in an amount 
not exceeding 257o of their current salary. This policy permitted 
such compensation to be earned during the time the faculty member 
was on Board appointment. 

Provost Tippo said, through its Committee on Sponsored 
Research, the American Council on Education made a study of the 
salary practices of academic institutions with reference to sponsored 
research and recommended that no additional compensation from any 
research grant be earned during academic year while on Board appoint 
ment. This recommendation is followed in actual practice at the 
University of Massachusetts. It is further recommended to change 
the policy statement of 1963 to conform to actual practice so that 
such additional compensation may only be earned during the summer 



t 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

months. Those members of the faculty on a 12-month appointment 
basis may not receive additional compensation in addition to 
budgeted salary. 

President Lederle endorsed the recommended change and 
stated that salaries are better and the former need for additional 
compensation less necessary. He encouraged the adoption of a 
policy of administration which would foster faculty taking vaca- 
tions, and limiting participation in additional programs. 
Discussion was held on paragraph 4, page 2, which set out the policy 
that additional compensation may be earned only during the summer 
months; the maximum additional compensation not to exceed 257o of 
the faculty members current academic year salary. Provost Tippo 
stated that 987° of the faculty are confined to 2/9ths of their 
annual salaries. He said the granting agencies usually will not 
allow more than this. 

Treasurer Johnson announced a report now in preparation 
will show the extra compensation earned in all categories and will 
effectively respond to recent allegations in the public press of 
faculty members earning in excess of $50,000 through additional re- 
search grants. 

Trustee Lamb son stated the whole program has serious 
overtones. The national program represents in the area of a billiofi 
dollars and some curb should be considered. Chairman Troy added 
this involved two things (1) the national policy and (2) our 
response. 

Provost Tippo stated in any case the Federal Government 
is doing what the University should be doing - supporting research, 
He stressed that grants are sought by members of the faculty so 
that research can be carried on by the University for the benefit 
of the state and the country. The Provost said the grants are 
thoroughly screened by national panels. 

After further discussion, Provost Tippo said the 
suggested change in policy is a tightening up, rather than loosen- 
ing and stated he would be amenable to limiting extra compensation 
to a period of two summer months, in accord with the policy follow- 
ed at many universities. In view of this, Trustee Rowland 
recommended that the University should work toward this objective. 

As a result of general discussion, it was agreed to 
strike the word "ordinarily" from the proposed policy (Document 
63-062) as indicated. Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the altered policy on com- 
pensation for certain additional pro- 
fessional services, with one change, the 
word "ordinarily" struck on page 2 as 
shown on attached document. 



3061 



Document 
T68-060 



3062 



COMMITTEE 



Policy on Pre- 
venting Con- 
flicts of In- 
terest in 
Government 
Sponsored Re- 
search 
T68-061 



Post-Doctoral 

Research 

Associate 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Provost Tippo supplied to the members of the committee, 
copies of a memorandum prepared by Chairman Moore of the University 
Research Council on the subject of the Conflict of Interest Policy. 
Concern has been expressed at the national level because principal 
investigators with federal grants sometimes are consultants for 
(or have financial interest in) manufacturing groups with identical 
interests and thus may unintentionally make available information 
from their personal research which is the property of the Federal 
Government or the public at large. The American Council on Educa- 
tion and the Council of American Association of University Pro- 
fessors in December, 1964, published a statement on prevention of 
conflict of interest in government sponsored research at universi- 
ties. The University Research Council approves of this statement 
and together with the Faculty Senate recommend its adoption. 

Trustee Rowland suggested substituting "will" for "should" 
in paragraph 2 and 3 as shown on attached Document T68-061. After 
discussion and agreement, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
adoption of the Policy on Preventing 
Conflicts of Interest in Government 
Sponsored Research at the University 
of Massachusetts. 

1. The principal investigator of any sponsored 
research project is required to report to 
the Dean of the Graduate School all con- 
sultantships which appear directly relevant 
to his research. 

2. The principal investigator will confer with 
the Dean of the Graduate School as a source 
of advice and guidance for advance consulta- 
tion on questions involving possible conflict- 
of-interest situations. 

3. A copy of the American Council on Education- 
American Association of University Professors 
policy statement on "Preventing Conflicts of 
Interest in Government Sponsored Research at 
Universities" will be given to each faculty 
member receiving a government grant. 

The Provost advised that in the absence of Dean Moore, 
who was unable to be present, he submitted for him the request of 
the University Research Council for establishment of a category to 
be known as the "Post-Doctoral Research Associate." This was 
supported by a memorandum (Document T68-062) which explained there 
were currently 25 post-doctoral fellows on campus, who assist a 
faculty member in his research. Since they are neither faculty nor 
students and have their Ph.D's, the Research Council recommends 
they be treated as faculty so far as prerequisites are concerned. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



This would include faculty privileges in use of library and labora- 
tory facilities, faculty housing priorities, parking permission, 
membership in the Faculty Club. It would not include voting privi- 
leges in the department or tenure credit. Provost Tippo agreed to 
rephrase the proposal to set out these exclusions specifically. 
The Council and Faculty Senate recommend to the Board of Trustees 
establishment of the aforementioned category holders to be 
appointed by the Board of Trustees with recommendation of the 
Graduate Dean. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
a category to be known as Post-Doctoral 
Research Associate be established. Holders 
of such title are to be appointed by the 
Board of Trustees with the recommendation 
of the Graduate Dean. 

Dean Arless Spielman of the College of Agriculture then 
joined the meeting. He presented a summary of his study of the 
history and future potential of the Departments of Entomology and 
Plant Pathology at the University. He stated a number of outstand- 
ing teachers and scientists from other universities were invited to 
the campus to evaluate the situation. They reported that decline 
of faculty morale, ineffective leadership at the department head 
level and the forced amalgamation of two unrelated disciplines 
(entomology and plant pathology) into one academic department con- 
tributed to poor standards. It was also stated that lack of 
modern scientific laboratories and equipment and lack of faculty 
versed in the newly developing specializations within the field 
were additional factors in the decline of a once nationally 
acclaimed department of the University. 

The Dean discussed this situation with the faculty; the 
result of this was a majority support of dividing the present de- 
partment into two administrative and academic departments: the 
Department of Entomology and the Department of Plant Pathology. 
After discussion with the Provost, the matter is now submitted as 
a recommendation to the Trustees. 

Trustee Lambson, from personal experience over many years 
confirmed the need as described of almost total and complete lack 
of modern laboratories and equipment. He stated it is shocking 
and downgrading to the University. 

Chairman Troy commented the decline in quality of the 
Entomology Department had been mentioned by a distinguished alumnus 
and stated part of this comes from the problem of internal leader- 
ship. 



3063 



Establishment 
of Separate 
Departments 
of Entomology 
and Plant 
Pathology 



3064 



COMMITTEE 



Master of Arts 
& Doctor of 
Philosophy De- 
grees in 
Comparative 
Literature 



Comparative 
Literature 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Provost Tippo stated that the division of the departments 
would not create additional cost except for the anticipated im- 
provements planned. He added that while the inclusion of these de- 
partments in the Life Science Building would be most desirable, it 
would mean an addition to the building and thus created the need 
for further legislative consideration for funds. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Department of Entomology and Plant 
Pathology be abolished and that the Depart- 
ment of Plant. Pathology and the Department 
of Entomology be established. 

Professor Fleischmann, Chairman of Comparative Literature, 
joined the meeting. He tendered a proposal to offer Master of Arts 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Comparative Literature. He 
stated the program would allow students to view literature through 
prism of cosmopolitan rather than purely national history. In out- 
lining the further advantages to the students, he stated the de- 
velopment of Comparative Literature has been a dramatic one, ad- 
vancing from three programs in the country in 1949 to forty-three 
in 1965. He noted that the University of Massachusetts is in ex- 
cellent position with doctoral programs in English, German, French 
and Spanish literatures, to take advantage of these resources and 
extend the program to include those recommended. Professor 
Fleischmann expressed confidence that graduate studies in Compara- 
tive Literature would attract substantial numbers of qualified stu- 
dents. A summary of his proposal, as well as an extensive in-depth 
analysis were supplied to the committee. (Document T68-063) 

After discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

adoption of the Proposal to Offer Master 
of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy Degrees 
in Comparative Literature (Document 
T68-063). 

Professors Zube and Bacon of the Department of Landscape 
Architecture then joined the meeting and presented a proposal for 
a graduate program leading to the degree of Master of Regional 
Planning. (Document T68-064) Professor Zube stated two major 
reasons for proposing the program: 

1. Impact of urban areas on rural region. 
Very few schools now offer programs in 
this area of planning. 

2. Real need to strengthen existing pro- 
grams on campus. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Professor Zube, in combination with Professor Bacon, 
described the proposed curriculum and in response to question ex- 
plained the need. They stated the city has been the main center 
of attention of the professional planners; awareness and concern 
for the region to provide the space for urban growth and basic re- 
sources for sustenance has placed emphasis on this planning unit 
only (in the last ten years) since the mid-fifties. There is now 
an awareness of the necessity of regional planning as a basic tool 
for social development. The awareness of the region as a logical 
unit for comprehensive as well as special purpose planning (trans- 
portation, open space or water resources) created demand for 
planner trained to work at the regional scale. It was stated that 
currently only the University of Pennsylvania has an effective pro- 
fessional planning program oriented to the problems of the region. 
Because of this lack of professional planning programs, the many 
offices and agencies in need of regional planners have been forced 
to hire traditionally trained city planners and then attempt to re- 
train them to meet the specific needs. 

Professor Zube stated an interdisciplinary committee is 
proposed for the program. 

General discussion ensued in which it was brought out that 
the role of the regional planner is as an advisor and coordinator 
and would involve complex and delicate areas including wetlands, 
riparian laws, etc. Professor Bacon said it would involve 
knowledge of land as a resource, which the city planner knows 
nothing about. He noted that there are a great many activities 
now at the University which would fit into the program admirably 
and it is hoped to augment this by contributions from a wide 
variety of backgrounds. The possibility of extension service train 
ing was explored. It is anticipated that the program would have 
enrollment of approximately ten students. 



After further comment, 
the meeting. 



Professors Bacon and Zube left 



Motion was then made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they establish a two-year terminal graduate 
program in Regional Planning leading to the 
professional degree, Master of Regional 
Planning. 

Dean Wagner and Professor Gilbert Lawall then joined the 
meeting and submitted a proposal for three new Classic courses: 

Latin 326 Latin Didactic Epic 

Latin 327 Latin History and Biography 

Latin 328 Latin Drama 



306; 



;> 



New Program 

Master of 

Regional 

Planning 



Master of 

Regional 

Planning 



Latin 
Courses 



3066 



COMMITTEE 



Tuition 

Waivers for 

Community 

College 

Faculty 

Members 



Proposal for 
Summer Study 
in Japan 
Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Troy then introduced discussion of Tuition 
Waivers for Community College Faculty Members. Copies of a pro- 
posed resolution were distributed to each member of the committee. 
After consideration, it was unanimously agreed to recommend to the 
Board of Trustees: 

WHEREAS it has been traditionally the posture of the 
University of Massachusetts to uphold and 
support the regional community colleges in 
every way possible, and 

WHEREAS the number of students coming to the University 
of Massachusetts increases yearly, to the point 
where eventually a third to a half of the stu- 
dents in the upper two classes at the University 
will have received their initial college train- 
ing at one of the regional community colleges, and 

WHEREAS it is definitely in the best interests of the 

University that faculty members at the regional 
community colleges have the advantages afforded 
by exposure to University instruction and re- 
search in order to better train students both 
on the transfer and terminal programs, and 

WHEREAS similar tuition waiver privileges are available 
to faculty members at the University who teach 
the same courses at the same levels to students 
who will end up in the same classes, it is 
therefore 

VOTED that the President is authorized to waive tuition, 
but not fees, for faculty members of Massachusetts 
Regional Community Colleges taking courses at the 
University of Massachusetts providing that the 
faculty members are full time before taking such 
courses and return to full-time teaching in their 
community college after completion of course work. 

Provost Tippo submitted a proposal from Professor Varley 
for a summer study in Japan program for summer 1968. This program 
is in cooperation with Sophia University's International Summer 
School program and the Council on International Educational Exchange 
and will offer an opportunity for six academic credits and direct 
experience with an Asian culture. This program is planned for a 
small group of 21-30 students. If fewer than 21 students apply, the 
program will be cancelled. There is no cost to the University. 

After discussion, motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of the Proposal for a Summer Study in Japan 
Program as outlined on attached Document T68-065. 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Lederle then described a proposal for a 
UM/Boston Junior Year in France, received at today's meeting. 
After discussion, it was agreed that Acting Dean Gagnon would re- 
turn the proposal with the recommendation that it be resubmitted 
in the fall. 

Professor Walker Gibson was introduced to the luncheon 
meeting. He submitted a proposal for a course in STUDIES IN 
RHETORIC AND PROSE STYLE, which is designed as an elective for 
graduate studies leading to a master's degree or doctorate, with 
special stress on preparation of graduate students as teachers of 
college English. Professor Gibson said young college teachers of 
English may expect to spend a major part of their first six years 
teaching composition, yet most graduate programs provide no back- 
ground for this work. It is proposed to offer a disciplined train- 
ing in prose style, with relevance to college teaching of composi- 
tion, thus providing an experience difficult to obtain at other 
graduate schools. It is expected to attract talented prospective 
college teachers to the University. The course would also have an 
immediate effect on the conduct of Freshman English at the Univer- 
sity, through exposure of the Teaching Assistant to this course. 

Professor Gibson left the meeting. 

Dean Bischoff then joined the meeting, of the Faculty and 
Educational Policy Committee and submitted a proposal for new 
courses in Physical Education. Three courses were proposed and 
included: 

PE 533 History of Sport in the United States 

PE 732 Motor Integration 

PE 740 Measurement Theory in Physical Education 

Dean Bischoff advised that any proposed course is checked 
with appropriate University committees and agencies and other in- 
terested people; for example, PE 533 (History of Sport in the Uniteji 
States) was cleared with the History Department. 

Dean Bischoff left the meeting. 

Chairman Troy referred to the listing of courses supplied 
to the meeting (Document T68-066) and asked for a report on the 
additions and other changes in courses approved last year. The 
Provost stated that last year there were 11 new programs, 2 re- 
vised; 71 new courses, 4 revised, 3 deleted. 

Motion was thereupon made and seconded, and it was 



-^ 



UM/Boston 
Junior Year 
in France 



Studies in 
Rhetoric 
and Prose 
Style 



Physical 

Education 

Courses 



3068 



New Programs 
and Courses 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of the Programs and New Courses 
of study as shown on Document T68-066 
attached to these minutes. 

The meeting was then adjourned. 




Robert 
Secretary, 





'McCartney 

of Trustees' 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

March 8, 1968, 10:00 a.m., Office of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay 
Associates, Watertown, Mass. 



PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Brown, Crowley, Maginnis, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 

BY IN- 
VITATION: Chairman Boyden, Vice Chairman Healey, 
Trustees Lyons, Rowland and Troy. 

ALSO : Chancellor Ryan, Acting Dean Gagnon, 
Planning Officer Littlefield, UM/B 
Planning Officer O'Brien; Messrs. 
Moynihan and Riesman (MIT-HARV) 
Messrs. Sasaki, Alexander, Chapman 
and Minervino of Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay Associates, Miss Coulter. 

Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 10:15 a.m. He 
introduced Dr. Patrick Moynihan and Dr. David Riesman of the 
Harvard-MIT Joint Center of Urban Studies and stated they had been 
interested and helpful in the committee search and consideration 
of locations for the planned UM/Boston campus. 

The Chairman then distributed to the meeting copies of 
a memorandum from the Student "Copley" Site Committee entitled 
COMMITTEE REPORT, March 8, 1968, which memorandum expressed concern 
about the permanent location of the UM at Boston campus, with 
support for the Air Rights-Turnpike site. Lists of support from a 
number of areas, including legislative and civic groups were also 
received. 

Chairman Haigis stated that the most important item on 
the agenda was discussion of the permanent site for UM/Boston. 

Chancellor Ryan stated the committee could at this meet- 
ing reach a point of decision. Selection of site had been narrowed 
down to one or two of which one is very preferable. He said he 
would recommend it and would like to have it voted. The Chancellor 
said the site he recommends has been discussed in renewed contact 
with the Boston Redevelopment Authority. Needed now is reaffirma- 
tion by the Board of Trustees of first priority of an "in Boston" 
(core city) site, and responsiveness on the part of the BRA to the 
University being in the city. 

A meeting was held on February 16 with some members of 
the Buildings and Grounds Committee and members of the University 
staff at the office of Hale Champion (Administrator BRA) which led 
to today's recommendation to the committee. The Chancellor identi- 
fied the site he believes preferable for permanent location of the 



UM/Boston 
Site 



3070 



COMMITTEE 



Three 

Sites Under 
Discussion 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

UM at Boston campus as the so-called Air Rights-Turnpike Site. 

He thereupon recommended this site and asked that it be 
voted as the committee's recommendation to the full Board of 
Trustees as the site for the UM at Boston campus. 

Chancellor Ryan stated that choice of this site requires 
approval by the Trustees of certain (4) policy limitations on the 
development of the site: 

1. Maximum enrollment must be limited to 
15,000 students. 

2. The land base for the campus is not ex- 
pandable. The site must be intensively 
developed. Plans must be in hand as de- 
velopment proceeds. 

3. The academic program will be limited to 
that projected at the time the campus is 
developed. This would reduce the possi- 
bility of graduate and professional pro- 
grams beyond the liberal arts graduate 
and undergraduate program; i.e. high 
space consumers such as engineering. 

4. Strictly a commuter campus. 

The Chancellor pointed out that, within the 15,000 enroll 
ment limitation, allowance must be made for continuing education 
activities: evening programs for adults and others. He noted that, 
under the conditions laid down by the BRA, these are policy impli- 
cations which must be accepted by the Trustees if the Air Rights 
site is selected. 

In response to Trustee Lyons' query whether subsequently 
business administration program, for example, could be established 
in some other part of the city, Chancellor Ryan said it is within 
possibility. Indeed, it is commonly found among urban universities 
in the United States that professional graduate programs are dis- 
persed. 

Mr. K. E. Alexander (Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates) 
then reviewed the three sites under discussion: 

The Turnpike-Air Rights 
The Columbia Point 
The Watertown Arsenal 

The members present were supplied with a 25-page comparison memo- 
randum, Document T68-067, which assessed the three locations. The 
assessment included revised and detailed information on each site. 
Mr. Alexander said the most significant change to be considered was 



COMMITTEE 



3071 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the reduction of the Turnpike-Air Rights site to 14.5 acres. Most 
of the study to be presented to this meeting is to demonstrate the 
feasibility of building a campus for 15,000 students on 14.5 acres. 

Mr. Alexander described the BRA viewpoint as one of 
consideration for the city and for the entire Back Bay area which 
is undergoing great change. Evaluation has to be made of the im- 
pact of the University on this area. 

A letter from the BRA summarized the site limita- 
tions as follows: 

1. Parking (the area cannot be overloaded 
with traffic) 

2. Expansion beyond the site limits would 
not be compatible with MBTA transit ser- 
vices. 

An "addendum" supplied during the meeting detailed the three major 
conditions relating to parking and transit that would have to be 
answered by the University in order to satisfy BRA requirements 
for approval (see attached) . Mr. Alexander illustrated the loca- 
tion of the acreage under discussion on a wall chart, showing its 
relation to the surrounding area. The steps necessary with 
abutters (Christian Science Church, MBTA, etc.) were briefly 
summarized. 

Mr. Minervino of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates 
posted a series of sketches which showed possible types of build- 
ing construction on the Turnpike site. He stated there are four 
problems which are apparent: 

1. Mass circulation of students within the area 

2. How to build adequately on such a limited site 

3. Mechanical aspects of such a project 

4. Staging of construction 

Mr. Minervino illustrated by table model and 
demonstrated by drawings that it was possible, through a "block 
plan" to develop, in fact, a megastructure which would cover the 
entire 14% acres. This plan included a great deal of internal 
space, with parking provided below the ground level. The major 
portion of the building would be 8-12 stories high. It was noted 
that a great deal of roof area would be available for recreational 
purposes. He stated that such a plan would present no structural 
problem, nor a mechanical one, but one of scale, since this is an 
entirely new concept and there is no precedent to follow. It was 
pointed out that this would be a large building, but not unduly so 
in terms of the surrounding area, which includes the 20-30 story 
apartment houses and the Prudential building. 



Site 
Limitations 



3072 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In summary, the consultants from Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay 
Associates expressed complete confidence that there would be no in- 
surmountable problem from a design point of view in supplying a 
building suitable for the academic program as described on the 
Turnpike site. Mr. Minervino concluded that the plan shown is only 
one proposal. There could well be others by different architects. 
It is clear, however, that the total educational program must be in 
hand at the beginning. No future expansion is possible on the site. 

Mr. Perry Chapman noted that presumably all of the in- 
ternal spaces would become active student-used spaces. Thus, the 
University could work within itself, even though, by its physical 
location, it would relate to the city. 

General discussion was held on relation of the site use 
to the city. 

Mr. Moynihan stated the 14% acres under consideration are 
not presently committed to any purpose or plan. Chancellor Ryan ob- 
served, however, that the BRA wants to know whether a 14-15 acre 
site such as this one, developed in this way, would be acceptable 
to the Trustees before they extend further consideration by their 
office. In addition, the question of acceptability to the abutters 
cannot be explored satisfactorily until the availability is entirely 
clear and the interest of the Trustees has been expressed. 

Mr. Moynihan stated that the BRA is interested only in 
what makes the best sense for the City of Boston. 

Mr. Chapman stated that informal conversations with BRA 
staff people led to the conclusion that the 14 acres represent what 
is left in an otherwise sacrosanct area devoted mainly to tax yield 
ing private development projects. The value of the land could be 
determined by communication with the Turnpike Authority in the event 
of Trustee interest. In the meantime, Mr. Alexander will check the 
City records to secure as much current information as possible. 

In the event of 15,000 enrollment, it is forecast that 
there will be 3,000 automobiles at UM/Boston alone. Parking would 
have to be provided in the project for these cars. 

In addition the BRA stated the need for a rapid transit 
line on either the New Haven or B & A alignment to render this 
Turnpike site acceptable for the UM complex. (see addendum attached]) 

Discussion ensued, during which Planning Officer O'Brien 
stated the MBTA has a plan to extend service, compatible with that 
specified by the BRA. This is currently listed as fourth on the 
capital program priority list which indicates a time schedule of at 
least two years. UM/Boston interest in the site might, of course, 
stimulate MBTA to a firm decision to locate their lines in this 
area. The two-year period would also phase in with the University 
timetable. In addition, the extra traffic load due to increased 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

enrollment at the University would not be evident for at least five 
years. This would conform to the MBTA schedule. 

Chairman Haigis summarized, that subject to the condi- 
tions they have set forth, this proposal for a UM/Boston site may 
be acceptable to the BRA at the staff level. Discussion was held 
on the climate of public acceptance of the proposal. The ChancelloJ: 
stated that the first consideration is whether or not the Trustees 
want this site. A secondary consideration is acceptability to the 
abutters. 

Messrs. Moynihan and Riesman observed that no other 
plans had been envisioned for this particular site. Also: 

a. A firm Trustee attitude will be important 
to the abutters. 

b. The BRA is willing to discuss this proposal. 

c. Enrollment of 10,000 undergraduates is just 
about right for an urban university. 

Mr. Moynihan said the Administrator of the BRA will make 
a recommendation to the Mayor of what he thinks is best for the 
city. He will not be influenced by the interests of commercial 
enterprise. However, there should be a statement of the Trustees' 
interest. "All the present plans for the City of Boston that pre- 
cede this issue," he stated, "would fit in perfectly with the needs 



of the University, 
use." 



There is a rate conjunction of plans and site 



Trustee Maginnis requested information on the financial 
aspect of developing this site. Mr. O'Brien stated this informa- 
tion had been requested, but was not yet available except as 
summarized in Document T68-067. 

Mr. Chapman stated a system for parking could be de- 
veloped on different levels that would provide 3,000 parking spaces 

Trustee Crowley observed that the feasibility of the site 
had been demonstrated. He suggested that attention should turn to 
studies of other sites as prepared by consultants. 

Chairman Haigis stated in the final analysis there are 
two sites within the city and one outside for consideration: 

Turnpike 
Columbia Point 
Watertown Arsenal 

Of these, BRA has voted to make Columbia Point available. 

Discussion was then held on whether to submit all three 
sites with recommendations or to submit only a first preference, 
the core city site, to the full Board of Trustees at this time. 



30 



,-o 



3074 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Healey opposed limiting the recommendation to one 
site without first thoroughly exploring the other two. He stated 
that Columbia Point and Watertown Arsenal should be subjected to 
the same detailed analysis as the Turnpike Site and similar date 
compiled and supplied before any final decision is reached. He 
stated, in view of the opposition to the original Copley-Turnpike 
site, that although the new proposal is on a much more restricted 
basis, it is imperative to consider other alternatives without 
further delay. He also stressed the need for immediate action. He 
objected to having a policy issue limiting enrollment to 15,000 stu- 
dents "folded in" as a condition for making any particular site 
available. The ultimate size of the institution is a separate 
question which should be determined solely by the Trustees. He 
stressed the advisability of securing statements from the Mayor and 
BRA affirming their interest in having the University at the Turn- 
pike site. The need to reassure the Legislature that concentrated 
and decisive action is underway to arrive at a final decision was 
also stressed. Trustee Healey asked for a definitive analysis of 
the Watertown Arsenal and Columbia Point sites comparable to that 
supplied on the Turnpike-Air Rights site. 

The President endorsed the need to supply information in 
depth on all three sites stating that this will allow all members 
of the Board, the Legislature and the general public to realize that 
the selections were reduced to three only after deep study. 

Mr. Riesman assured the committee of his awareness of the 
political problems faced by the University. He stated, however, if 
there is to be a bifocal academic structure, it would be desirable 
to have Amherst suburban and Boston urban, rather than two separate 
suburban campuses. 

Mr. Alexander again reviewed for the committee Columbia 
Point and Watertown Arsenal as summarized in Document T68-067. He 
stated that the most significant difference between all sites (of 
which approximately 50 had been explored since the deliberations 
began) is location, size, and transit access. He reviewed for the 
committee transit accessibility of the three locations now under 
consideration with emphasis on the travel time involved. It is 
possible to build UM/ Boston on any of the three sites; each one has 
severe but different limitations. 

In a brief review of sites, Mr. Alexander stated that 
Columbia Point involves 100-150 acres composed mostly of landfill 
from trash disposal. The site is expandable by filling into the 
ocean if desired (with suitable approval from proper authorities) . 
A transit link is needed. Existing MBTA at Columbia Circle or Savin 
Hill are at least a mile from the edge of the site. 

Dr. Riesman urged the committee to consider the financial 
future of the University in Bostqn. He quoted a recent article in- 
corporating a proposal to the Ford Foundation for setting up an edu 
cation and development center and noted that in order to get outside 



I 



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I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

funds for education, it is necessary to link with the inner city. 

Mr. Moynihan informed the meeting that, in conversation 
with the director of the BRA, he had described the city's negative 
reaction to UM/Boston consideration of the Turnpike site last 
spring. He was assured that this would not prejudice consideration 
at this time. 

There was discussion of the detailed information re- 
quested by the BRA in advance of any firm commitment on their part 
with respect to the Turnpike site: 

1. Access points to site 

2. Peak loads and times (persons and vehicles) 

3. Policy on expansion 

4. Policy on continuation 

5. First floor diagram of main building showing 

circulation pattern 

6. Building space intermodel, 

7. Fiscal situation - payment in lieu of taxes 

Trustee Healey re-affirmed that these matters required 
policy decisions and should be discussed in open meeting by all the 
Trustees. The implemental cost of expansion is a vital factor for 
consideration, as is the limited site vs the more general site. 
Such matters need policy decisions. He pointed out the untenable 
position of being required to take a stand on a first choice of sit 
before knowing of its availability. He pointed out that the BRA is 
willing to say that Columbia Point is available without advance ex- 
pression of interest by the Trustees. He questioned why they could 
not do so for the Turnpike site. 

President Lederle suggested preparing documentation on 
all three sites and arranging for general discussion with the 
Trustees in advance of the full Board meeting on March 22. The 
Board would then be in a position to vote its choice on that date. 

Mr. Alexander stated that the Watertown Arsenal property 
has approximately 53 acres. In view of the lack of public transit, 
there would be a need for additional parking facilities. 



Trustee Rowland asked for more information on the other 



sites. 



After considerable discussion, it was the consensus there 
was a need for certain policy decisions prior to selection of the 
site. It was noted that the size of the campus also dictates the 
scope of the academic programs able to be offered; also, the size 
of enrollments. These are policy decisions which require action of 
the full Board of Trustees. 

Chairman Haigis agreed to make every effort preceding the 
meeting of March 22 (and without committing the Board) to secure a 

statement from the BRA as to availability of the Turnpike site, 



3075 



3076 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

with the understanding that the Mayor and Mr. Champion would support 
the University's selection. 

Chancellor Ryan said he did not think there is a better 
location for the UM at Boston than the Turnpike site. He stated 
Columbia Point had many disadvantages, but it did exist as available 
within the city. He noted, however, that this location would 
markedly influence the scope of educational services that could be 
provided to people who were not presently being served. 

President Lederle pointed out a future adult education 
facet of the University is already established at the Park Square 
location. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : That the Turnpike Site for the UM at Boston 
campus is the preferred choice of the 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds providing 
that the Boston Renewal Agency and Mayor 
White indicate their approval of said site. 

It was agreed that the members of the committee were to 
be notified of the reaction of the BRA and the Mayor as soon as 
possible, and prior to the Board of Trustees meeting of March 22. 

Chairman Haigis agreed to advise the members present of 
any decision from the BRA and the Mayor, prior to the Board meeting 
on the 22nd. In the event that a reply is not forthcoming, all 
three sites will be placed before the Board without a prior committe 
vote. 

Trustee Healey said a special meeting of the Board on this 
matter is most urgent, as there is an obligation to fully inform the 
student body and the faculty of UM at Boston that every effort has 
been extended to explore the Turnpike site, among others. 

Treasurer Johnson questioned when the information re- 
quested by the BRA would be submitted, in response to Mr. Champion's 
request for detail. He was assured by Mr. O'Brien that this would 
be prepared by the 18th. 

President Lederle commented that great progress is indi- 
cated by the fact the committee has reduced the great mass of sites 
down to three as shown. In the meantime, one may be eliminated, and 
we are now exploring the other two in depth. 

It was agreed that the committee will meet again, before 
the meeting of the full Board scheduled for the 22nd of March, after 
response has been secured from Mayor White and the BRA. 

It was agreed that President Lederle would respond to 
Mr. Champion's letter and communicate the vote of the committee. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The next item was location of the 1970 Residence Hall 
complex. A model was exhibited by Planning Officer Littlefield. 
Alternate locations were discussed, in view of petitions received 
from students opposing location of these residence halls in the 
Women's Quadrangle. Student petitioners had been heard at the last 
meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

Mr. Galehouse explored possibilities of relocation which 
would satisfy the program requirement. Alternatives explored in- 
cluded dropping the program, or lowering the program requirements. 
Consideration was also extended to making the structure low rise, 
removing the three towers which would mean removing 900 students 
and leaving only a 500 student capacity. Mr. Galehouse stated it 
would be possible to remove the towers, and then add two stories 
to the buildings. Dean Field has suggested the possibility of 
cutting the program back by housing fewer graduate students. 
Mr. Littlefield stressed the effect of low density use of land on 
the enrollment capacity of the campus. Other areas discussed in- 
cluded the wooded area north of Eastman Lane, and on top of the 
hill. 

Mr. Galehouse stated that all of the spaces in this new 
proposal, however, are larger than anything in the Southwest design 
He stressed the importance of keeping the designed spaces open as 
sun pockets, and agreed with the President that the pond and wooded 
area contribute greatly to the campus. Mr. Littlefield assured 
that the Health Council had been consulted on all phases of the 
proposed construction. 

Treasurer Johnson stated that self- liquidation of the 
project will require room rents of $500 or more per student. The 
subject of board and room increase overall will be submitted to 
the next Executive Committee meeting. 

After thorough discussion, during which all alternatives 
were reviewed without finding a suitable alternate location, mo- 
tion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

there be no change in the original recommenda- 
tion to accept the feasibility study for the 
1970 dormitory location and to proceed with 
plans. 

Note: Subsequently the architects have proceeded to 
investigate alternate sites which will be pre- 
sented at a future meeting. 

Treasurer Johnson notified the committee that four bids 
had been received on the Campus Boulevard project, the plans for 
which had been accepted by the committee at its preceding meeting. 
Puffer Construction Company of North Amherst was the low bidder. 



30' 



1970 

Residence 
Hall 
Comp lex 



Campus 
Boulevard 



3078 



COMMITTEE 



Berkshire 

Gas 

Company 



North 

Pleasant 

Street 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

An appropriation of $1,000,000 is available. Motion was thereupon 
made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they award the contract for con- 
struction of the Campus Boulevard to 
the low bidder, Puffer Construction 
Company, for the sum of $923,473. 

The Treasurer informed the meeting that the University 
had used bottled gas for campus needs such as cooking and laboratory 
use and also had projected use of gas in the Campus Center. It is 
now proposed by the Berkshire Gas Company, at no cost to the Univer- 
sity, to install gas lines and bring the supply to the foundations 
of the buildings. He stated that rates are comparable to large user 
rates. It is expected that use of gas will bring about a saving of 
several thousand dollars during the course of each year. The 
Treasurer said the contract submitted by Berkshire Gas for approval 
is a standard form of agreement and it is computed so there will be 
no demand charges. He indicated on a map the proposed location of 
the supply lines. In the forthcoming power plant expansion, the 
boilers are designed for coal with auxiliary use of gas; a heating 
proposal will be submitted on this also. The Treasurer said there 
will be savings by conversion to natural gas. 

After consideration, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

they approve the agreement with the Berkshire 
Gas Company for installation and maintenance 
of gas lines on the campus in accordance with 
the terms of a contract on file in the office 
of the Treasurer. 

The location of the Life Science Building was discussed. 
The Treasurer advised he had submitted a proposal to the Amherst 
Town meeting that North Pleasant Street be relocated. However, 
after intensive discussion, it became apparent this was untenable 
and consideration is now extended to providing pedestrian tunnels or 
bridges over North Pleasant Street. It will be impossible to remove 
North Pleasant Street from the campus, and it is, therefore, planned 
to design around it to make it more safe and attractive for students 
A study prepared by Mr. Galehouse was posted, showing how a building 
could be a bridge. 

The Dean of Arts and Sciences has expressed his opposition 
to this plan. 

Mr. Galehouse pointed out that there are two concerns: 

1. Building location 

2. Road itself 



I 



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li 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

He reminded the committee that the question of use of North Pleasan: 
Street had been a recurring one during the six years of association 
with the consultants (Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates). As yet, 
no generally acceptable solution has been reached. He proposed 
reconstruction of North Pleasant Street through the campus as a 
reasonable alternative, with provision for safe crossover. Within 
general discussion, other alternatives were offered and considered. 
President Lederle stressed the need for a central link which would 
permit walking through the campus. 

The Treasurer next advised that the Designer Selection 
Board has before it the four names recommended by the committee: 
Marcel Breuer, The Architects Collaborative, Vincent Kling and 
Deeter, Ritchie & Sipple. He questioned whether the University 
should at this time continue to submit this site under these condi- 
tions, or whether an alternate site should be considered. The town 
has been asked to bar truck traffic on North Pleasant Street. They 
are anxious to do this and are currently studying the legality of 
such a move. The Treasurer recommended continued consideration of 
this matter by the committee so that a decision could be reached 
before the designer is appointed. He then indicated on a campus 
map the area to which the Life Science Building should be related. 
Mr. Galehouse suggested the possibility of having the architect 
study more than one site. 

After intensive consideration, it was the sense of the 
meeting that the location should be reviewed again. 

The Treasurer apprised the committee that the utility and 
power plant work is behind schedule. He stated that if the weather 
is extreme for a continued period of time next year, there will be 
some heating problems. As a result, it has been necessary to cut 
back on furnishing power or steam to the contractors on the build- 
ings now in construction. 

Treasurer Johnson then informed the committee that a loca 
building plans to construct low cost housing for married students 
within one mile of campus, if it is not the University's plan with- 
in the next five years also to build such housing. The builder has 
asked for a guarantee to this effect. Treasurer Johnson noted that 
it is not planned to build such additional quarters on campus. He 
asked for an expression of the committee on the advisability of ex- 
tending such an assurance. He identified the builder and the type 
of housing planned. 

After discussion, it was agreed to submit this matter to 
the full Board of Trustees for their consideration. 



The meeting was adjourned at 3:55 p.m 





J. McCartney 
Board of Trus 



3079 



Life 

Science 

Building 



Hous ing - 
for Married 
Students 



3080 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 
March 22, 1968, 10:00 a.m., Sheraton Plaza Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Emerson, Gordon, 
Maginnis, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Act- 
ing Dean Gagnon, Planning Officer 
UM/Boston O'Brien, Messrs. Sasaki, 
Alexander, Chapman of Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay Associates; Speaker of the 
House of Representatives Quinn, and 
Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 10:45 a.m. The 
purpose of the meeting was discussion of the site for the permanent 
campus of the University of Massachusetts at Boston. 

The Speaker of the House of Representatives, Robert H. 
Quinn, was introduced to the meeting. 

Chairman Haigis then invited Chancellor Ryan to report 
on a meeting he and President Lederle held with the Mayor and BRA 
Administrator Champion earlier that morning, in order to determine 
their attitude toward the proposal for selection of the Air Rights 
Site for the Boston campus. 

Chancellor Ryan advised that the site preference had now 
narrowed down to three, two of which are in the City of Boston and 
the third of which is not. He described Speaker Quinn' s interest 
in the site selection, both as an elected representative of the 
City of Boston, and in his capacity as Speaker of the House of 
Representatives. He then invited Speaker Quinn to address the 
committee. 

The Speaker reviewed his interest in the University, in- 
cluding co-sponsorship of the original legislation with Senators 
Donohue and Kenneally, to establish the Boston campus of the Uni- 
versity. He stated the location of the permanent site of the cam- 
pus was a decision for the Trustees to make. He stressed the 
cooperation extended and the restraint exercised by the legislative 
leadership in this respect. The Speaker stated the decision was a 
difficult one and rested in the hands of those well qualified to 
make a judgment in the best interest of the University and the 
young people it will serve. As a resident of Boston, Speaker Quinn 
expressed the great concern and hope for an early decision, shared 
by the general public, as well as disappointment at the lack of in- 
terest evidenced in an educational institution in a core section of 



308 



UM/ Bos ton 
Site 



3082 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston. He noted that Boston has always been troubled with the tax 
base due to the numbers of educational and religious institutions 
clustered within the center city. The Speaker said his basic pur- 
pose in appearing at today's meeting was to say that whatever 
strength the leadership can bring to bear will be available to 
support the Board of Trustees' best judgment, unfettered by any 
fears of what sort of objection might come from the business or 
political community. 

Mr. Quinn expressed the opinion that the University should 
seek a core city site for a number of reasons, including the 
cultural benefits in the area and the advantage of providing easy 
access to young people residing close to the Greater Boston area. 

The Speaker stated he had seen the proposal for the Air 
Rights-Turnpike site and, personally, found it difficult to en- 
vision. He did agree to support the proposal in deference to expert 
consultant opinion. He stated, however, that if the obstacles for 
an intown site proved too formidable and decision was made to locate 
elsewhere, he hoped for consideration of Columbia Point. He 
stressed again that it was a matter for decision by the experienced 
experts to determine the feasibility of any location, and he pledged 
his continued cooperation. The Speaker stated he was thoroughly 
conversant with the drawbacks to consideration of Columbia Point, 
which included a housing development, but he encouraged serious con- 
sideration of this area in the event that a core city location is 
not finally selected. 

Speaker Quinn also suggested consideration of the present 
Fenway Park stadium as the core of a proposed University of Massachu 
setts/Boston campus. Expansion would occur from that base. The 
Speaker stated this possibility would be entirely dependent on the 
relocation of the stadium (and would of necessity involve public 
subsidy of the stadium) perhaps at the North or South Station in 
Boston. If the decision were to locate the campus here, it would 
accomplish two things, with a single effort, he said: (1) establish 
the campus in a favorable core city location and (2) provide a new 
stadium, which project has been under active discussion for some 
time. 

The Speaker said these matters were submitted for con- 
sideration only. He assured the committee of his awareness of their 
exhaustive and concentrated search for site. His view is (1) the 
location of UM at Boston ought to be a center city site. With 
reference to the protracted search and time-consuming exploration of 
more than 50 possibilities, he said he was aware that "you are 
being frustrated and badgered by the political community and the 
business community." (2) The combination of site and stadium is 
worthy of consideration. The Speaker assured the committee: "-if 
support be needed, I will lend it." 



Chairman Haigis submitted the possibility that the UM/Bost 
buildings now in use at Park Square would in all probability 



jn 



3083 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

continue to be used (and possibly expanded) for adult education 
and similar uses, in the event that Columbia Point were the ulti- 
mate choice for a campus site. 

Speaker Quinn demurred, stating he could not conceive of 
two fifteen thousand University of Massachusetts within two miles 
of each other. 

The President said that, except for adult education which 
could be accommodated at the present UM/Boston Arlington Street 
location, there would be ample space for all programs at the 
Columbia Point location, if this were chosen. 

The Speaker spoke enthusiastically about the ultimate 
aim of the University, stating that the cooperative interchange of 
faculties with adjacent institutions both at Amherst and Boston 
will prove both economical and stimulating. 

Trustee Gordon complimented the Speaker on his interest 
and presentation, stating that this is the kind of political 
leadership needed and desired and which will engender cooperation. 
He questioned whether investigation of these additional site 
factors proposed by the Speaker with resultant delay would further 
aggravate the expressed legislative dissatisfaction with the rate 
of progress toward a final decision. The Speaker assured the 
committee of his awareness that a final decision in the abstract 
(at committee level) had been made several months ago after inten- 
sive search and great deliberation, and that the committee was then 
faced with the civic and business opposition which occasioned the 
ensuing delay. He expressed willingness to support extension of 
time to permit further investigation of the new site possibilities 
which have come into the picture today. 

President Lederle expressed concern that consideration 
of the Fenway Park location would create much further delay due to 
involvement at the political level, since relocation and con- 
struction of a stadium would be an additional concern. Speaker 
Quinn assured that there should be no association between the 
stadium and the University after the original planning. He offered 
to lend his best efforts in this direction. 

There was further discussion of the Fenway Park proposal 
with Speaker Quinn, including available acreage. It was pointed 
out that the University would expect to grow gradually by the addi 
tion of possibly 1,000 students a year, and not jump to full en- 
rollment immediately. Mr. Quinn said informal conversations with 
owner Yawkey had revealed interest and sympathy for the proposal to 
locate the University within the Fenway Park area. 

President Lederle then described the earlier meeting with 
Mayor White. He said the Mayor took the position that the Univer 
sity ought to be in the core city; however, after viewing models of 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

proposed construction feasible for the Air Rights location, he was 
opposed to establishing the University on this site. The Mayor 
felt that too massive a structure was proposed. The President re- 
ported that, if fewer students were involved, the site would have 
been considered acceptable. The Mayor was quoted as stating this is 
a very logical place for an educational institution, but on techni- 
cal and aesthetic grounds it would not be suitable for the large 
numbers of students expected to be enrolled by the University in the 
years ahead. 

The Mayor and BRA Administrator Hale Champion questioned 
whether all possible sites in the city had been examined. They pro- 
posed reconsideration of fhe North Station site. They indicated 
preference for the Columbia Point location, and gave the impression 
that, regardless of other development proposals for the area, the 
University would have first choice. 

Chancellor Ryan added that he had advised the Mayor he 
felt the Trustees would not take a vote today, but three sites would 
be recommended for Trustee consideration, including the Air Rights 
site along with a statement that the City of Boston would not suppor 
it. The Mayor did not wish it said he was opposed to educational 
use of the site, but stressed that he was opposed instead to the 
kind of structure dictated by University needs. 

Chancellor Ryan advised the Mayor and Mr. Champion of the 
continued interest of the Trustees in a central city location for 
UM at Boston, and asked for alternatives to the Air Rights site. 

In addition to his joint suggestion with the Mayor, re- 
garding the North Station, Mr. Champion mentioned the possibility 
of expanding in the present location at Park Square. 

The Chancellor noted that the Mayor's posture taken to- 
gether with Speaker Quinn's suggestion provided justification for 
further Trustee study. 

Considerable discussion followed. It was agreed that the 
committee would present as its report to the Board of Trustees, a 
series of slides provided by Mr. K. E. Alexander of Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay Associates reviewing site criteria (no specific site applica- 
tion) and the application of these criteria to the deliberations of 
the committee over the past months. In addition, Chairman Haigis 
will inform the Board of the three sites which are the result of 
sifting through 50 original possibilities, plus the new suggestions 
made by the Mayor and Mr. Champion; also, that made by the Speaker 
of the House of Representatives. 

The new possibilities are: 

North Station 

Expansion in presently occupied locations 

Fenway Park 



OMM1TTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson then informed the committee that the 
proposed location for the "1970" dormitories had been re-examined. 
The architects will review the project and will submit two addi- 
tional suggestions. It is expected these will include the follow- 
ing: 

(1) Locate north of Eastman Lane (wooded area) . 
This can be done at least cost. 

(2) Reduce the North Quadrangle project to 900 
students and eliminate the proposed towers. 

The Treasurer said recommendation to the Board will be 
deferred until these studies have been considered by the Buildings 
and Grounds Committee. It is anticipated that this will be 
accomplished within two weeks. 

The Treasurer then advised that the Designer Selection 
Board had considered three of the four names suggested for the Life 
Science Building by the committee. These are Vincent G. Kling & 
Associates, Deeter, Ritchey & Sippel and Shepley, Bulfinch, 
Richardson & Abbott. 

It was agreed, in the event a preference was asked for, 
to consider Vincent Kling & Associates. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 




Rob 
Secret 




o ; > 



1970 

Residence 
Hall 
Complex 



Life 

Science 

Building 



J. McCartney 
Board of Trus 



3086 



COMMITTEE 



Residence 
Hall 
Visiting 
Policy 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
April 3, 1968, 11:00 a.m., Whitmore Administration Building, Amherst 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Lyons, President Lederle; 
Trustees Croce, Emerson, McNamara, 
Rowland, Treasurer Johnson. 



Provost Tippo, Dean Moore, Dean Field, 
Miss Coulter; James Collins, President 
of the Student Senate, Frances Boronski, 
Vice President of the Student Senate; 
Area Coordinators Burke, Brubacher, 
Gonon; Professors Berkman, Goddard, 
Higgins, Maynard and Schumer from Stu- 
dent Affairs Committee-Faculty Senate; 
Susan Tracy of the Student Life 
Committee; Peter Ward and representa- 
tives from Yahoo. 



Chairman Lyons convened the meeting at 11:00 a.m. and in- 
vited the Provost to initiate discussion on the first agenda item, 
Residence Hall Visiting Policy (i.e. open house policy). 

Provost Tippo stated that copies of documents summarizing 
the Student Senate recommendations and the Faculty Senate 
recommendations on Open House Policy had been supplied in advance of 
the meeting to the members of the committee. He then distributed 
copies of changes recommended in the latter document after study by 
the administration. He pointed out these recommendations included 
change of title to more aptly describe the policy as "Residence 
Hall Visiting Policy," and the concommitant deletion of the term 
"open house" throughout the document as noted. 

Recommendation of the administration also includes dele- 
tion of items which set forth the numbers of open houses and the 
provision relating to door of the participating resident. He ex- 
plained these changes were recommended on the basis that the entire 
program is predicated on the exercise of responsibility by the stu- 
dents. Furthermore, it is an experimental program for one year, 
subject to review by the Board of Trustees at the end of that time. 
In the event the program has not worked out, it will then be modi- 
fied. Students under 21 years of age must have parental consent to 
participate in the program. The responsibility for the satisfactory 
operation of the plan reposes on the Dean of Students. 

The Provost advised that conferences had been held with 
the students on these matters and that in addition they had been in- 
vited to join the meeting to afford opportunity for further dis- 
cussion with the members of the Trustee committee. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Brief discussion was held on material pertinent to YAHOO 
(student humor magazine) which had been supplied to the committee 
in advance of the meeting (Document T68-075 - YAHOO Constitution) . 

The representatives of the student government, faculty 
senate and area coordinators then joined the meeting. 

Chairman Lyons welcomed the group and established the 
procedure, stating the Trustees would listen to begin with and 
raise questions informally. He then asked Provost Tippo to open 
the discussion. 

The Provost informed the group that the Trustee Committee 
on Student Activities had received the Student Senate and Faculty 
Senate statements of recommended policy on open houses. In addi- 
tion, the administration had made certain recommendations for 
changes which included a suggested change in name to Residence Hall 
Visiting Policy. He outlined the other changes: 

1. Delete reference to 10 open houses per month. 
Suggest - adopt student statement, which leaves 
it indefinite, subject to majority vote of resi- 
dents . 

2. Delete reference to open or closed doors. 
Essence of program is student basic assump- 
tion of responsibility. 

3. Cost factor. In the event the cost of administer- 
ing the program escalates, the students will be 
expected to assimilate the additional cost. 

4. This is an experimental program for one year; 
at the end of that time the Trustees will 
evaluate experience and consider any necessary 
changes. 

5. Modification of student statement on parental 
consent - raise age limit from 18 to 21. 

After the general summary of the administrative state- 
ment, there was discussion of the item on the Faculty Senate docu- 
ment, which it was said is intended to protect the right of the 
minority by providing choice, and arranging accommodations for thos 
students desiring residence units with few or no open houses, 
specified quiet hours, or similar conditions. The Provost stated 
this responsibility would repose in the Dean of Students. Dean 
Field responded by describing a proposed tally at room choosing 
time which would indicate student resident preference, and permit 
suitable assignment. 

The President of the Student Senate, Mr. James Collins, 
was then invited to comment. President Collins stated he believed 



308? 



3088 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Student Senate would accept the administrative proposal warmly, 
though in fact it differs from their proposal with respect to guest 
regulations and parental consent (students recommended under 18; 
administration suggests under 21) . 

President Collins commented that parental consent is an 
anathema to students and, therefore, some students would be critical 
of this provision, but since the entire program is based on the hono 
system and enforces dialogue between students and parents, it would 
in all probability be acceptable. With reference to the provision 
for advancing costs, he stated he did not envision an increase in 
the cost of administering the program in the residence halls, but 
expressed confidence the students would bear an equitable part of 
it should it become necessary. 

President Lederle stated the budget is horrendous this 
year and stressed that absolutely no money is available for this 
program. The Provost agreed to present a summary of any additional 
costs if such addition materialized. In which event, President 
Collins said, he believed the students would assume any additional 
cost. He stated, however, it seemed unlikely cost would increase 
since there are sufficient staff people and these should be augmenteld 
by students to do any necessary policing. If, however, the students 
do not assume responsibility, he said, the policy should be re- 
scinded. 

Chairman Lyons asked for comments and any difference of 
view. The representative of the Faculty Senate Committee on Student 
Affairs stated he considered it a very reasonable statement and 
felt it would be acceptable both to the committee and to the stu- 
dents. 

Dean Field requested Area Coordinator Burke to speak as a 
member of the Student Personnel staff. Mr. Burke said, in accord 
with the provisions of the document, each residence hall has its 
own responsibility to operate its own program. Thus, if students 
are allowed to participate in such a function without parental per- 
mission, it will be violation of one of the agreements that allows 
them to have the privilege. He stated it is the responsibility of 
the House to see that no student participates who has no right to 
do so. 

There was further discussion in which it was stated the 
Dean of Students is notified of violations of regulations by the 
Area Coordinators. There was general agreement that the program 
cannot be successful unless the Area Coordinators assume this son- 
siderable responsibility, and in turn the Dean of Students supports 
and enforces the regulations. The Dean pointed out that flexibility 
is insured by dealing with each House. He stated that if the 
government of the house is not a viable group then they are not 
ready for Open House Policy. Area Coordinator Burke expressed his 
satisfaction with the document as now proposed. 



COMMITTEE 



3089 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Emerson suggested the possibility of students 
checking "yes" or "no" on the guest record to indicate possession 
of a parental permission card. The President of the Student 
Senate said that since this will be Student Government law, as well 
as Trustee regulation, if a student does not abide by this (or any 
other rule) , it is a matter for action by the Judiciary. He 
stated it is the responsibility of the Student Senate to find a 
solution that will be fair to as many people as possible, though, 
of course, it will not appeal to everyone. Any student who parti- 
cipates, without a parental permission card, will be subject to 
judiciary procedure. The Student Senate should be responsible for 
policing. 

President Collins described action already taken on in- 
fraction of regulation where two residences held "open houses" 
illegally. The Student Senate sent representatives to each house 
to discuss the infraction and neither has since held another 
illegal open house. Had the infraction been repeated, the matter 
would have been brought to the General Court. He said a house 
operating contrary to policy hurts all. Dean Field confirmed that 
the Student Senate has always taken action before any administra- 
tive intervention has been needed, which indicates the students 
will accept responsibility. 

There was further general discussion in which Trustee 
Croce stated he applauded placing the Residence Hall Visiting Police- 
on the honor system but felt some sort of tangible record was 
necessary in order to evaluate the program. Dean Field agreed and 
stated detailed data would be gathered in great depth to supply a 
basis for evaluation. 

The meeting then advanced to discussion of the next 
agenda item: YAHOO (campus humor magazine). 

Senate President Collins described the changes in the 
staff of the paper and the new operating procedures incorporated 
in the constitution now submitted for consideration (Document T68- 
075) - all designed to improve the quality of the publication and 
insure high standards of taste and creativity. He expressed the 
interest in a satirical humor magazine on campus and stated 
favorable consideration has been extended by the Communications 
Board and the Student Government Board for placing this publica- 
tion under the Recognized Student Organizations. 

Chairman Lyons questioned whether this publication should 
not be entirely independent, run by those who desire a humor 
magazine, and not subject to administrative supervision, and also 
not supported by student tax (as it would if included in RSO) . 

Mr. Collins said the Student Senate in its deliberations 
endorsed the idea of a satirical magazine. In response to the 
Chairman's question as to whether this could be considered already 
supplied through other channels, i e. Spectrum and occasionally 



YAHOO 
Constitution 



3090 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Collegian , President Collins said it was felt to so hold would 
(1) shun the problem of whether a satirical magazine is wanted and 
also (2) the student body believes in building a tradition of one 
satirical magazine on campus. He then presented Mr. Peter Ward to 
the committee. 

Mr. Ward, who is a senior, described the earnest and in- 
tensive efforts to reorganize YAHOO. He introduced two members of 
the staff stating that they were underclassmen and would thus in- 
sure continuity of new purpose. He felt the difficulties en- 
countered by YAHOO were occasioned by the controversy of two years 
ago, rather than current barriers. Mr. Ward said a student project, 
designed to deal with the, campus community, should be recognized as 
something associated with the University and not separate; there 
should be some influence of student government over these media and 
thus it should not be an independent publication. 

Mr. Ward averred one of the greatest needs of the campus 
is communication: media directly and immediately related to the 
'"city."- He drew a corollary with campus radio station (WMUA) a 
university station with special programs related to the University. 
Mr. Ward said he had worked for a year to assemble the new YAHOO 
organization. He stressed the significance of close association 
with advisors available on campus, stating that if the publication 
became an independent, off -campus, publication, it was unlikely a 
quality magazine would result. The primary concern, he said, is to 
produce a high quality satirical journal. 

Professor Isidor Silver, as a member of the Communications 
Board, was asked to comment. He expressed the view that one of the 
advantages to such a publication is the educational value. He felt 
the financial difficulties would be insurmountable, however, if it 
were to be published off campus. 

There was general discussion, which included exploring 
the role of the advisor as described in the proposed constitution 
(Document T68-075, section VIII). Discussion encompassed manner of 
handling complaints against members and officers (section 1, 
Article IX). Trustee Croce questioned the ambiguity on page 2, with 
regard to voting members and the provision he must attend two meet- 
ings, without specification as to whether these were "special" or 
"regular" meetings. 

In response to Trustee Rowland's inquiry as to publishing 
schedule, Mr. Stevens said that formerly it had been four times a 
year, but this would now be dependent on available funds. Student 
Senate President Collins suggested the probable initial limitation 
to two issues in order to afford opportunity to be assured of satis- 
faction with the quality. 

Discussion was held on the possibility of a new name for 
the publication. Mr. Ward strongly supported retaining the present 
name in order to prove the improved quality of the journal in its 
subsequent operation. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Silver then described the stringent qualifications 
imposed and the Communication Board's diligence in assuring proper 
elections of the present members of the staff. 

Student Senate President Collins said if the organization 
does not live up to expectations, the student government will 
rescind its support. 

President Lederle addressed himself to Professor Silver, 
and stated he was opposed to censorship, but questioned the posi- 
tion of the Communications Board in such a circumstance. He stated 
the University is very vulnerable and even though there is no legal 
damage, there must be some communication in monitoring. 

Professor Silver said he could not speak for the other 
members of the Board, but felt it was a variable situation. He 
said consideration of complaints would be welcome and also the 
opportunity to create dialogue between people who are offended, in 
an effort to resolve the matter in some way. He stated his 
antipathy for censorship, saying the Board in fact is a kind of 
forum that has been designed to serve the purpose of airing com- 
plaints. 

Mr. Ward pointed out that the Senate could decide, for 
example, if the intent had been to offend, through the advisor 
system and the obligation to submit copy. 

President Lederle said there is a built-in consultation 
provision and hopefully it would lead to (nine times out of ten) 
prevention of publishing questionable material. Freedom of speech 
is advisable, but freedom of dirty speech is not and can create 
great damage to this institution, he said. 

Trustee Croce expressed himself in favor of having the 
magazine within RSO (campus organization) . He urged that the meet- 
ings described in Article II, section I, page two be specifically 
designated as "regular" meetings and stressed the great importance 
of the complete journal receiving the advisor's attention. He 
commented on the important role the advisor plays. After these 
considerations, he stated a satirical magazine has a place in a 
large university, as long as the appropriate safeguards are in- 
stituted. 

The committee next considered the matter of signs carried 
by student demonstrators during picketing of Colt Firearms repre- 
sentatives on campus. The picketing was described as orderly, but 
one member carried a sign bearing an objectionable "four letter 
word." Copies of a memorandum prepared by Graduate Dean Moore 
(Document T68-073) were supplied to the members of the committee. 
This memorandum listed the various avenues explored in order to 
establish perspective on the problem. 



3091 



Student 
Posters 



3092 



COMMITTEE 



Executive 
Session 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The administration sought an expression of Trustee opinion 
on the best manner of handling any repetition of such incident. 

Trustee Rowland then asked for the view of the Student 
Senate. Senate President Collins stated that conferences had been 
held with the President, Provost, Dean of Students on this subject 
and one of the reasons the campus had no large scale revolts is due 
to the fact there is nothing to revolt against, the lines of 
communication are open. He felt there should not be a hard and fast 
rule against profanity. He expressed the preference for social 
pressures, stating the average student on campus is a relatively 
well mannered, conservative person, and amenable to no one. 

An informal poll of female students present indicated full 
agreement with Mr. Collins 1 assessment and recommended policy. 
Dean Field advised that picket lines have been worked out in advance 
in every instance with considerable respect for ground rules. 

Trustee Rowland said this indicates the value of student 
leadership and that social pressures are effective. 

Mr. Collins credited administration officials such as 
President Lederle, Provost Tippo, Dean Field and Dean Moore with 
maintaining liaison with the campus and thus eliminating alienation. 

The students then left the meeting. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To go into executive session. 

After due discussion, motion was made and seconded, and 



it was 



VOTED : To come out of executive session. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:25 p.m. 




Secreta 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
April 10, 1968, 2:40 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



3093 



Acting Chairman Healey, President 
Lederle; Trustees Emerson, Haigis, 
Lyons, Pumphret, Troy; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



Chancellor Ryan, Dean Redfern, 
Business Manager Grady, Associate 
Treasurer Brand; Mr. Kittle and 
Miss Coulter. 



In the absence of the Chairman, Trustee Pumphret was 
appointed Chairman pro tern. 

Discussion was held on the proposed room and board rate 
increase, material relevant to this having been supplied to the 
members of the committee in advance of the meeting (Document T68-07(J) 

Treasurer Johnson advised that the proposal that room 
rents be equalized across the campus had been discussed with the 
Dean of Students and had the concurrence of the student personnel 
people. The Treasurer said the commitments made under Management 
and Services Agreements to the Building Authority would be met 
first through the rent income for each residence hall. Conference 
has been held with Counsel Broadhurst on the appropriate phases of 
the plan. 

The Treasurer said the differential is covered in terms 
of the financial aid program for students who might suffer hardship 
by the increase. 



Business Manager Grady was asked to speak to the pro- 
posed increase in board rate. He commented on the dining commons 
labor costs and University policy to adapt to the needs and wishes 
of the students as much as possible with respect to the "required 
board" regulation. However, it was pointed out that no state uni- 
versity in New England has engaged in as large a program of dining 
hall construction as the University of Massachusetts; also, that 
the costs of amortizing this construction must be met. These 
factors result in higher operating costs than in institutions which 
do not follow similar practices. He referred to the unlimited 
"seconds" policy and optional weekend meal ticket offered and other 
influencing factors. 

Vice Chairman Healey joined the meeting and assumed the 
chair. After further broad and intensive discussion, motion was 
made and seconded, and it was 



Room 
Rents 



Board 
Rates 



3094 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the Board Rate at the University 
Dining Commons be increased effective 
for the fall semester, 1968, as follows: 

That, until and subject to further action of 
the Trustees amending the same, the following 
be and hereby is adopted as the schedule of 
charges for meals to be served commencing 
with the first day of the semester to commence 
in September 1968 in student dining facilities, 
other than any owned or leased by University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority, operated by 
the Trustees and that the following be and here- 
by are fixed as the fees, rents, rates and 
other charges for any other use of any such 
facility on and after such date: 

Schedule of Charges : 

For 15 meals per week - $245 per semester (1) 

For 21 meals per week - $340 per semester (1) 

(1) in each case excluding meals during 
extended vacation periods. 

Per day - $2.90 (effective for summer school, 
vacation periods, etc.) 



Per meal 



Breakfast 
Lunch 
Dinner 
Sunday dinner 



$ 



.95 
1.25 
1.50 
2.00 



These rates supersede those of April 21, 1966. 
Group meals conference rates, individual food 
and drink items - such amount as the Treasurer 
of the University shall fix to cover the cost 
of materials and special services plus reason- 
able provision for other costs and expenses. 

Fees, rents, rates and other charges for other uses 
of student dining facilities : 

For rental or other use of all or any part of a 
facility - such amount as the Treasurer of the 
University shall fix to cover the cost of any 
special services plus reasonable provision for 
other costs and expenses. 



COMMITTEE 



"O 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Refund Schedule 

A student who withdraws from the University- 
after paying a semester meal charge shall be 
entitled to a pro-rata refund on such charge, 
less administrative costs in such amount as 
the Treasurer of the University may fix, pro- 
vided, that no such refund shall be charged 
against any meal charge proceeds which are 
payable to University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Authority under any Management and Services 
Agreement relating to any dining facility owned 
or leased by the Authority. 

The Treasurer shall report to the Trustees all 
charges, fees, rents and rates established by 
him under authority of this resolution. No 
such charge, fee, rent or rate so established 
shall be reduced, but may be increased, without 
prior approval of the Committee of the Trustees 
on Buildings and Grounds. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
schedule of charges set forth in the foregoing 
vote be and hereby is recommended to University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority for adoption 
as the schedule of charges and other fees for 
meals served in and other uses of dining facili- 
ties owned or leased by it and that the Secretary 
of the Trustees be and he hereby is directed to 
certify these votes to the Authority as the 
writing provided for in Management and Services 
Agreements now in effect between the Commonwealth 
and the Authority pertaining to such dining 
facilities. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees to dis- 
continue the differential in student room 
charges and to re-establish the policy of one 
rate for student rooms in all residence halls 
on the campus and to continue the practice of 
permitting students to choose their room each 
year on the basis of class seniority. 

And it was 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they adopt in principle the policy of 
spreading the maintenance and operating 
costs over all dormitories through the 
General Services Trust Fund in accordance 
with a flow diagram of accounting procedures 
as presented to this meeting and to request 
legal counsel to prepare a vote for recommenda- 
tion to the Trustees that will comply with the 
terms of the several Management and Services 
Agreements between the Trustees and the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Building Authority. 

And it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the following be and hereby is established 
as the schedule of charges to be in effect 
for periods commencing on or after the be- 
ginning of the academic year in September 
1968 for occupancy of dormitory accommoda- 
tions, other than those in University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority dormitories, 
at the University, namely: 



Period of Time 



Semester 


15 


weeks 


14 


weeks 


13 


weeks 


12 


weeks 


11 


weeks 


10 


weeks 


9 


weeks 


8 


weeks 


7 


weeks 


6 


weeks 


5 


weeks 


4 


weeks 


3 


weeks 


2 


weeks 


1 


week 



Per day 



Charge 

$210.00 

197.00 

184.00 

171.00 

158.00 

145.00 

132.00 

119.00 

105.00 

93.00 

80.00 

66.00 

53.00 

40.00 

27.00 

14.00 

2.00 



provided, however, that if and whenever more 
than the design number of students shall be 
assigned to occupancy of dormitory accommoda- 
tions, other than those in University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority dormitories 
for periods of more than four weeks each, the 
charge per student for such occupancy during 
such period shall be 80% of the applicable 
charge stated above. This vote supersedes 
the vote of April 21, 1966. 



VOTED : 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the following be and hereby is recommended 
to the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority as the schedule of charges to be 
in effect for periods commencing on or 
after the beginning of the academic year in 
September 1968 for student occupancy of 
dormitory accommodations in University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority dormitories, 
name ly : 



Period of Time 



Semester 


15 


weeks 


14 


weeks 


13 


weeks 


12 


weeks 


11 


weeks 


10 


weeks 


9 


weeks 


8 


weeks 


7 


weeks 


6 


weeks 


5 


weeks 


4 


weeks 


3 


weeks 


2 


weeks 


1 


week 



Per day 



Charge 

$210.00 

197.00 

184.00 

171.00 

158.00 

145.00 

132.00 

119.00 

105.00 

93.00 

80.00 

66.00 

53.00 

40.00 

27.00 

14.00 

2.00 



Residence Hall Faculty Apartments $30.00 per month 

provided, however, that if and whenever more 
than the design number of students shall be 
assigned to occupancy of dormitory accommoda- 
tions, for periods of more than four weeks 
each, the charge per student for such 
occupancy during such period shall be 80% of 
the applicable charge stated above. This 
vote supersedes the vote of April 21, 1966. 

The Treasurer reviewed with the committee the Plum Island 
and Gloucester, Coast Guard facilities available to the University 
for marine science use. He submitted for consideration two re- 
vocable licenses from the Coast Guard to the Trustees (handled by 
the firm of Ely, Bartlett, Brown and Proctor, Inc. and approved by 
the Assistant Attorney General as to content. The effect of the 
license is to give the University the right to use the property at 
no expense to the University. Subsequently, when the Coast Guard 
has moved and the property is declared surplus, the University will 
have first priority to secure the facilities. Treasurer Johnson 
stated this has been discussed with the Chancellor of the Board of 
Higher Education. The Board has no objection to these procedures. 



Marine 
Science 



3098 



COMMITTEE 



TV 

Agreement 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After further discussion, motion was made, seconded, and 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they authorize Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson 
to sign for and in the name of the Trustees 
a Revocable License for the use of a parcel 
of land owned by the United States of America 
and under the jurisdiction, custody and con- 
trol of the United States Coast Guard located 
at Plum Island, Newburyport, Massachusetts 
for a period from March 1, 1968 to March 1, 
1969 with provisions for renewal for four 
additional years in accordance with the terms 
of the Revocable License as presented to this 
meeting and on file in the Office of the 
Treasurer. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they authorize Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson 
to sign for and in the name of the Trustees 
a Revocable License for the joint use with 
the United States Coast Guard of the station, 
buildings and dock at Gloucester, Massachusetts, 
for a period from March 1, 1968 to March 1, 
1969 with provisions for renewal for four addi- 
tional years in accordance with the terms of 
the Revocable License as presented to this 
meeting and on file in the Office of the 
Treasurer. 

Secretary McCartney then described the content of a pro- 
posed agreement, which would allow the University to erect equip- 
ment related to the operation of the future ETV channel on Mt. Tom. 
He stated this is currently a costless item, and the potential 
yearly cost has been discussed in general terms with the Legisla- 
ture. Secretary McCartney said that before Channel 57 can be 
assigned to the University, it will be necessary for the Legislature 
to fund the Television Center it established by enacting S267 in the 
last session. Sometime, after July 1, it is expected that Federal 
matching funds would be available. 

After discussion and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve an agreement to lease certain 
space and facilities on Mt. Tom presently 
owned by the WHYN Stations Corporation as 
detailed in Document T68-076. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson circulated a listing of transfers made 
during the last year (Document T68-077) . He reviewed the basis 
for the transfers, documented in the memorandum supplied. 
Chancellor Ryan briefly commented on the transfers related to the 
Boston campus. 

It was moved, seconded and 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
VOTED : To approve the budget transfers for the 
fiscal year 1968 as detailed in Document 
T68-077, which document is herewith 
attached to and made a part of these minutes. 

Dean Redfern advised that in accord with established pro- 
cedure, copies of the transfers are delivered to Messrs. Rigney 
and Tynan at the State House and questions solicited. At Chairman 
Healey's suggestion, endorsed by the full committee, future pro- 
cedure will include personal explanation of the items listed, as 
an aid to full understanding by the legislative leadership and the 
Executive Department of the need and nature of the transfers. 

Brief discussion was held on the progress of the Build- 
ings and Grounds Committee deliberations with reference to a site 
for the permanent Boston campus. A progress report will be made 
at the next meeting of the committee, April 15. 

The Trustees retired to executive session at 4:15 p.m. 
for the purpose of discussing certain matters related to personnel. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:45 p.m. 




Rober 
Secretary, 




McCartney 
Sard of Trustee 



3099 



Budget 
Transfers 



310 



COMMITTEE 



UM/ Bos ton 
Site 



1970 
Dormitories 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 
April 15, 1968, 10:00 a.m., Whitmore Administration Building, Amhers 

PRESENT: Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Emerson, Gordon, 
Maginnis, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Trustees Pumphret and Troy; Provost 
Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Acting Dean 
Gagnoh; Planning Officer UM/B, O'Brien, 
Miss Coulter; Dr. Raymond Wyman, Chair- 
man, Master Planning Committee; Planning 
Officer UM/A, Littlefield; Dean of Stu- 
dents Field; also Messrs. Kohn and Post 
from the office of Architects John Carl 
Warnecke. 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 10:15 a.m. He re- 
ported on the recent developments in the search for a site for the 
Boston campus. He stated that progress is being made. Four meet- 
ings were held with various civic leaders and interested area groups 
and it is expected the results of action initiated in these meetings 
will be available within two weeks. Chancellor Ryan and UM/B 
Planning Officer reported briefly on meetings attended by them, 
relative to site selection, these included Fenway Park area and 
Columbia Point. A UM/B faculty senate vote in favor of Park Square- 
Stuart Street was read. The meeting then proceeded to discussion 
of the 1970 residence hall location. 

Treasurer Johnson advised that the feasibility of loca- 
tions other than that originally proposed for the 1970 dormitories 
had been explored. He asked Mr. Kohn and Mr. Post of the John Carl 
Warnecke Associates office to describe the results of the studies 
made by them. 

By means of projected slides, two table models and two 
site plans (posted), Mr. Kohn illustrated alternate solutions. He 
briefly reviewed the history of the studies, beginning with the 
original plan for 1400 students, to which the residents of the 
northeast quad objected on the basis the density was too great. 
This led to consideration of other site areas 6n campus and in- 
cluded the wooded area east of the tennis courts. 

It is now proposed to provide for 900 students in the 
quad and 1400 students in the wooded area east of the tennis courts. 
Illustrations were shown of these proposals. The proposed plan 
would include three buildings for 1970 to house 1400 students in 
the wooded area. A year later, the project calls for units to house 
900 students in the "quad." In subsequent years, additional 



1 



COMMITTEE 



III 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

construction could be developed in the wooded area. Mr. Kohn 
stated the 1400 students would use the present North Dining 
Commons. When the student residents reached 2800, another dining 
commons would be provided in the area of the new buildings in the 
wooded area. 

The feasibility study proposed six buildings, seven to 
eight stories high, composed of modules housing 8 students (two 
double rooms, four single rooms, living room and bathroom). He 
also presented a low rise, four house plan (housing 770 students, 
in five student units: 2 doubles and one single, living room and 
bathroom); to be located in the northeast quadrangle. Mr. Kohn 
stated the buildings would be brick and of modern detail. 

Reference was made to the fact the cost of connecting the 
utilities to existing points of service would be included with the 
cost of the residence hall construction. 

Chairman Haigis commended the plan and stated the ori- 
ginal concept had been entirely abandoned in favor of the new pro- 
posals. He informed the committee the University Master Planning 
Committee had voted approval of the site for 1400 students, with 
the addition of another 1400 at a later time, with the low rise 
dormitories . 

There was discussion of the overall master plan for the 
campus (Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates). Assurance was given 
that the proposed construction would be compatible with this plan. 
It was further stated the proposed design is compatible with the 
concept of University College. Dean Field stated it was an 
entirely logical arrangement and could provide a perfectly 
reasonable solution for any such future program envisioned. It 
was noted that the University College concept remains entirely de- 
pendent upon legislative appropriation. 



After further discussion and on motion made and seconded, 



it was 



3101 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of the proposal to locate residence halls for 
1400 students at the location east of the tennis 
courts (as shown on a diagram) for the fall of 
1970; and residence halls for approximately 800 
students in the northeast quadrangle to be ready 
for the fall of 1971. 

Treasurer Johnson then informed the committee of the 
action of the Executive Committee in recommending approval of two 
licenses from the Coast Guard for the use of facilities at the Plum 
Island and Gloucester locations, for the use of the University 
marine sciences program. He stated these documents had been 
approved as to content by our legal counsel and by the Assistant 
Attorney General. The effect of the license is to give the 



Master 
Plan 



3. LOS 



COMMITTEE 



Life 

Science 

Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



University the right to use the property without cost. Subse- 
quently, the University will have first priority to the facilities 
when the Coast Guard has moved and the property is declared surplus. 

The Treasurer advised that Designer Vincent Kling had 
been appointed by the Architects Selection Board and Commissioner 
DeFalco to design the Life Science Building on the Amherst campus. 
He distributed copies of a brochure depicting some of the products 
of Mr. Kling 1 s design. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:30 a.m. 




Robert 
Secretary, 




McCartney 
Sard of Trus 




1. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 
May 3, 1968, 10:00 a.m., Hancock Room, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Emerson, Gordon, Maginnis, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Act- 
ing Dean Gagnon, Dean Soutter, Planning 
Officer UM/Boston O'Brien; Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 10:15 a.m. He 
stated the primary purpose of the meeting was to discuss the 
progress of the search for a permanent site for the UM/Boston 
campus . 

Secretary McCartney advised the meeting of a telephone 
message just received from Vice Chairman Healey indicating that a 
communication from Mr. Kelso of the Greater Boston Chamber of 
Commerce stated the result of their investigations revealed that 
the original consideration of a plan for expansion east in the Park 
Square area was not feasible, but the proposal to move west along 
Arlington and contiguous area warranted a considerably more opti- 
mistic outlook. It was pointed out, however, that expansion west 
involved the possibility of limiting enrollment to 10,000 students. 

With reference to the Fenway Park location, Chancellor 
Ryan advised that Speaker Quinn had informed him on Monday that no 
further progress had been made, but a break through was expected 
by Friday (today). However, nothing as yet has been released. 

The North Station and South Cove locations were discussed 
Planning Officer O'Brien stated the possibilities in the North 
Station were no more encouraging than when first investigated: a 
fine location, but difficult to develop. He advised that Trustee 
Healey, upon his arrival, would report on the South Cove location, 
including the availability of the Hotel Statler. 

In response to request, Mr. O'Brien clarified the 
restrictions on the Park Square area expansion. These included 
the fact that it is in a renewal area, plans for the section east 
of Arlington Street are well integrated and established and not 
amenable to University acquisition. Plans for the section west of 
Park Square, however, are "soft." This area could lend itself to 
consideration for University purposes. Mr. O'Brien said conference 
with the BRA indicated that specific plans for the area are not yet 
worked out in detail, but, in his opinion, it is evident the amount 
of land available is well below the fourteen (14) acres discussed 
in connection with the Air Rights site. 



3 LOS 



UM/Boston 

Campus 

Site 



3104 



COMMITTEE 



Medical 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle asked for an expression of opinion on 
UM at Boston faculty reaction to the concept of a "core" location, 
if it meant acquiring bits and pieces of buildings on separate 
streets, as compared to dynamic new structures as part of a com- 
pletely new campus. Acting Dean Gagnon felt the faculty opinion 
would be divided because of the difficulty already experienced in 
old buildings, and conditions and the use of space. He stated, how- 
ever, many of the faculty doubtless would prefer to remain in the 
core, particularly the humanities, despite the disadvantage of size 
and structure. The Chancellor and the Dean submitted that reduced 
space need per student might be preferable to more space in a 
different location. 

Chairman Haigis informed the committee of a conversation 
held with the Governor during the past week in which the committee 
deliberations over site selection were reviewed. Brief reference 
was made to the possible availability of the Hotel Statler, predi- 
cated on construction of a new structure for the hotel use and the 
concommitant tax revenue to the city. 

The Dean of the Medical School reported briefly on the 
current situation pertaining to the Worcester building program. He 
advised that the various government agencies have urged that the 
hospital applications for funds be submitted before the middle of 
June so as to permit a site visit before the end of June, in order 
to accommodate their administrative schedules. 

Dean Soutter is extending every effort to assemble requi- 
site data for Trustee approval to be submitted at an early meeting, 
in order to comply with this deadline. 

Dean Soutter reported the architects have been able to re- 
duce the costs on the Shaw Building renovations so that this total 
project will now be under one million dollars. A prolonged use is 
planned for this building and a relatively simple design has been 
requested. A preliminary sketch was displayed. 

The Dean also briefed the committee on the current status 
of the Medical School grant application which will be reviewed 
during the last ten days of May by officials in Washington. Our 
consultants have dispatched a letter of justification and explana- 
tion in support of those areas which were questioned. In addition, 
Dean Soutter has maintained a continuing communication with Senators 
Kennedy, Brooke and Congressman Donahue, as well as Governor's 
special assistant in Washington, John Jackson. The Dean informed 
the committee of his impending visit to Washington in support of 
these matters and his intention at that time to again seek the ad- 
vice and counsel of Congressional representatives. After general 
discussion, it was the consensus that Speaker Quinn and Senator 
Donahue should also be asked to write to these Congressmen. 

Dean Soutter reported satisfactory progress on approval 
with the library and research factors of the proposal. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



With reference to the Shaw Building, Dean Soutter ad- 
vised that a sum of money has been placed in escrow and the 
Attorney General's office is pursuing the controversial matter of 
title. 

The Dean then informed the committee on the current 
status of property adjacent to the Worcester campus owned by a re- 
ligious group, on which they had planned to build a new church. 
Construction of this edifice at a new location is now underway and 
acquisition of this adjacent land for University use is dependent 
upon reaching agreement on the purchase price. 

Discussion was then held on the progress of the UM/Boston 
building renovation program. Planning Officer O'Brien described 
the planned and needed renovations and the cost factors. 

After discussion, the matter was left that Treasurer 
Johnson would attempt to resolve the situation with Mr. O'Brien 
and Drummey, Rosane and Anderson, architects. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:15 a.m. 




Rober 
Secretary, 



3105 



3106 



COMMITTEE 



Deanship 

Home 

Economics 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL 

POLICY 

May 3, 1968, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Haigis, Lambson, Lyons, 
Maginnis, Plimpton, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo; Chancellor Ryan; 
Dean Soutter; Acting Dean Gagnon; 
Miss Coulter; Professor John 
MacCombie, UM/Boston. 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 11:15 a.m. He in- 
vited Provost Tippo to describe the qualifications of a proposed 
candidate for the Dean of Home Economics. 

The Provost distributed a four-page summary of the candi- 
date's professional record, publications, offices held in pro- 
fessional associations, awards and honors gained. After discussion, 
the candidate was invited to join the meeting. 

The candidate stated she would lead the Home Economics 
faculty in a self study project to consider what the future role of 
that school should be. The need for change in the concept of the 
field was emphasized and the fact that Home Economics must serve the 
needs of the people and society in a contemporary context. The 
candidate explained there is very little "how to do it" in modern 
programs. Study is devoted to corporate matters. She noted that 
many of the production activities that formerly were undertaken in 
the home are now supplied by the manufacturing industry. Thus, 
Home Economics must concern itself with business and government and 
their impact on the consumer and family; also with urban problems. 
The candidate stated that each program should be tailored to the 
needs of the state in which it is offered. It should not be modeled 
after an existing program in a totally different area. The candidate 
then left the meeting. 

The Provost stated it was hoped to appoint the candidate 
for a three year term. He added that the Home Economics faculty 
was enthusiastic. He urged favorable Trustee action on the appoint- 
ment. 

After further discussion, it was unanimously agreed to 
add this appointment to the Personnel Actions to be submitted to 
the Trustees for consideration and to recommend approval. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The meeting then moved to discussion of the Resolution on 
Admission of Disadvantaged Students. Acting Dean Gagnon distri- 
buted to the meeting a memorandum which described the program at 
the University in Boston. He stated the program in Boston in- 
cluded 98 negro students, out of an enrollment of 2570, almost 47o 
of the total enrollment. The Dean described the recruitment pro- 
gram which is calculated to attract promising students of all races 
from economically depressed neighborhoods in Boston and surround- 
ing cities. He stressed the acute need, within this program, for 
financial aid and special tutorial help for the disadvantaged stu- 
dents. 

There was general discussion of the scope of the program. 
President Lederle stated: (1) these are not unqualified students; 
(2) the qualifications have to be determined by different criteria. 
Additional factors must be considered. The President noted that, 
although the program itself is not restricted to negroes, a dedi- 
cated group of negro faculty at the University have worked 
energetically and with considerable self sacrifice to encourage 
applications for admission from promising negro students. 

The President assured the committee that the University 
Admissions Office pursues the policy of encouraging admission of a 
limited number of disadvantaged students. In addition, special 
tutoring arrangements employed in other areas may be extended to 
include this program. Negro members of the faculty have conferred 
with the Governor in an effort to secure $250,000 to aid this 
overall effort. 

Provost Tippo described the keen interest of the Dean of 
the School of Education and his faculty members in the program for 
disadvantaged students. It was agreed to invite Dean Dwight Allen 
to attend the July meeting of the Trustees to present his ideas 
for the handling of this problem. The Provost stated that a report 
on this special group is in preparation and will be available at 
the end of the year. 

After extended discussion, the committee concluded that 
the vote passed at the previous meeting, approving in principle the 
program recommended for students from disadvantaged areas, was 
sufficiently inclusive and did not require further action by the 
Board of Trustees. 

Acting Dean Gagnon then submitted a proposal for a Junior 
Year Abroad, developed by Professor John MacCombie of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Boston faculty, who joined the meeting and 
spoke for the proposal. After discussion, it was agreed to defer 
formal consideration of this matter until the next meeting of the 
committee to afford sufficient opportunity for study. 



The meeting was adjourn 




12:15 p.m. 



Robe 
Secretary, 




McCartney 
»ard of Trustees 




310? 



Disadvantaged 
Students 



UM/Boston 
Junior Year 
Abroad 



3108 



COMMITTEE 



New Courses 
UM/ Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL 

POLICY 

May 21, 1968, 11:00 a.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst, Mass, 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Haigis, Maginnis, (Thompson); 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Act- 
ing Dean Gagnon, Dean Moore, Professor 
Evans, Assistant to the Provost Venman; 
Miss Coulter. Dean Hunsberger, Pro- 
fessors: Bischoff, Mellen, Wagner. 

Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 11:00 a.m. He 
introduced the discussion of agenda item - "New or Revised Courses 
and Major Requirements for the University of Massachusetts/Boston," 
and invited Acting Dean Gagnon to present comments. 

The Dean referred to the listing supplied to the committee 
in advance of the meeting, showing Course Proposals for the Boston 
campus (1968-69) - Document T68-082 - and full supporting documentation 
as attached to and made a part of these minutes - Document T68-082a. 
The Dean said this is a course package to complete the offerings of 
most of the larger departments for the senior year. He drew 
attention to the fact that the first class of seniors of an in- 
definite number will be initiated in September and the proposed 
courses generally fill out the major program of the larger depart- 
ments. 

Dean Gagnon stated 110 new courses were added and 30 
courses were dropped, resulting in a final total of 80 new courses. 
Of this total, there were 52 new courses proposed in the Humanities 
(24 dropped) ; nine courses proposed in Mathematics (2 dropped) ; 24 
proposed new courses in Social Sciences (4 dropped) ; and 25 new 
courses proposed in the Natural Sciences . The Dean drew attention 
to the fact that analysis showed the heaviest influences were felt 
in the English department, where 13 courses were dropped, in the 
course of reorganization of this program. He pointed out this 
brought the course structure closer to the administration's original 
recommendation for this department. An analysis of the courses 
dropped showed four Art courses, thirteen English courses, one 
French course, two Latin Classic courses, two Mathematics courses, 
three Music courses, one in Philosophy, three in Psychology and one 
in Sociology. 

After discussion, Dean Gagnon, stated most of the new 
courses were for the senior year or for the major in the related 
department (either junior or senior) . 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



In response to Chairman Troy's request for figures on 
the distribution of majors among the divisions. Dean Gagnon approxi 
mated 207, in Natural Sciences, 107o in Mathematics, 307, in the 
Humanities and 407, in the Social Sciences. This is comparable to 
the distribution in Amherst, except in the division of Natural 
Science where enrollment is lighter in Boston and Social Sciences 
is heavier. The Dean said this is in part attributable to the fact 
History is part of the Social Sciences structure in Boston and not 
in the Humanities, as it is in Amherst. 

The Chairman initiated discussion on the 15-1 student- 
faculty ratio and its practical application to the present programs 
In response, the Chancellor stated there were very few courses with 
just a handful of students and noted that the ratio in Social 
Sciences is 65-1 and in the Humanities 48-1. A full exposition of 
these figures is made in the Master Plan. 

The importance of "bread and butter" courses, dealing 
with statistics, computer science and allied fields was stressed. 
Chancellor Ryan stated the Economics Department offers courses in 
computer introduction to data processing. The Chairman of the 
Mathematics Department is anxious to begin a program in computer 
work and the possibility of securing a small computer through sur- 
plus property to advance this program is being explored. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the Course Proposals, 1968-69, 
Boston campus as shown on Document T68-082. 

Chairman Troy then introduced for committee consideration 
the "UM/Boston Proposal for a Junior Year in France." 

Chancellor Ryan reviewed this proposal for the committee 
He stated: (A) Professor MacCombie in the French Department has 
organized a good academic program (B) this program has been con- 
sidered and recommended by all the usual channels, including the 
UM/Boston Faculty Senate (C) the program is well organized (D) as 
an evidence of moving out in the desired direction and appeal to 
both student and faculty bodies, it merits support. 

There was general discussion, during which the committee 
indicated the need for further time to explore all facets of the 
matter in depth, including the relation to the Atlantic Studies con- 
cept. Consideration was given also to the fundamental idea of the 
usefulness and serious purpose served by a Junior Year spent in this 
fashion and whether in fact it is a declining custom. The influence 
of the current chaotic situation in France, student revolts, over- 
crowded classrooms at the Sorbonne, were considered. Dean Gagnon 
cited the Sweet Briar and Smith programs, as examples of programs 
which have been rigorously organized and have attracted serious 



3109 



UM/Boston 
Junior Year 
in France 



3110 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

students. He stated his conviction that the UM/ Boston program is 
well integrated and thoroughly planned and should be allowed oppor- 
tunity to advance. The value of a capable and dedicated Director in 
the program was stressed and the need for continuity of direction. 
Dean Gagnon expressed confidence that Professor MacCombie supplied 
these qualities. He presented the consideration that under the 
Spartan conditions of the UM/Boston at Park Square, this proposal 
offered an opportunity for expanded student experience not otherwise 
possible. 

Discussion was held on the budget projected for this pro- 
posal in which Treasurer Johnson and Dr. Venman participated. 

President Ledefle read excerpts from an analysis of the 
University's International Programs, which raised questions of - 

1. whether it is advisable to have a Junior Year 
Abroad 

2. whether there are existing programs - or whether 
the proposal is unique 

3. whether continuity of leadership is anticipated 

4. University coordination problem, i.e. faculty 
member leading the program must have some Uni- 
versity support 

The President said the result of the analysis is a 
suggestion that a University committee be appointed to investigate 
and review all aspects, prior to submission of any proposal to the 
Board for their consideration. President Lederle stated he was not 
opposed to the proposal, but felt it required more thorough investi- 
gation and study. He encouraged a hard headed look at its unique- 
ness, as well as lead time so that the opportunity could be extended 
possibly to interested students on the Amherst campus. He expressed 
the hope that the interest of the 17 students, who form the group 
proposing to spend the Junior Year Abroad next year, would be sus- 
tained for another year to permit adequate consideration by the 
Board and others. 

General discussion followed and included description of the 
academic program, mechanics of the proposal, as well as the practica . 
considerations of living arrangements and travel. Dean Gagnon 
anticipated that a majority of the students interested in this pro- 
gram would be teacher candidates. 

Provost Tippo, upon invitation of the President, en- 
couraged approval of the proposed program, pointing to the small 
budget entailed and to the beneficial effect on the morale of both 
students and faculty at Boston. He drew attention to their many 
discouraging problems including the lack of permanent site. 

The Chairman summarized that the financial details are 
not insupportable; the UM/Boston students are entitled to any 
feasible consideration in view of the lack of amenities in their 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

campus; the program is tightly arranged and directed by a capable 
member of the faculty. 

Motion was then made, and seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
in principle of the proposed UM/Boston Junior 
Year in France (Document T68-083) subject to 
presidential approval of budget. 

Chancellor Ryan then introduced Professor R. Evans to the 
committee who presented a Proposal for a Professional Theatre Pro- 
gram at UM/Boston (Document T68-084) . Although the program has no 
curricular involvement, it suggests an institutional sponsorship 
with resultant academic implications which require committee con- 
sideration. The proposal has been examined and is recommended by 
the appropriate academic affairs and senate groups of UM/Boston. 

A brief summary of the proposal statedfhat UM/Boston has 
little prospect for competing with its neighbor institutions in 
athletics or fine arts, but now has an opportunity to complement 
its sister institutions in the field of performing arts. This 
opportunity is afforded by the availability of the Wilbur Theatre 
from January 1 through August 30 annually. It is proposed that a 
professional resident company at UM/Boston produce an American 
repertory exclusively. The resident company would offer itself for 
cultural exchange abroad through the State Department. The company 
would aim at providing opportunity for the student population in 
and around the city to see American classics and new American drama 
It is also envisioned that it would become a Massachusetts State 
Theatre at some future date with all the implications. The im- 
portance of early decision was stressed in view of the need to 
staff and program the operation for January 1969, and the resultant 
need for a decision to lease the building. 

Professor Evans stated there are professional companies 
in residence at such universities as Michigan, Princeton and 
Brandeis . 

It is anticipated that the income will balance the lease 
cost. Substantiating data was supplied to the committee, both as 
to proposed organization and program. The availability of the 
building as an auditorium for purposes including convocations, 
meetings, concerts was described and considered. Trustee Haigis 
proposed consideration of future purchase of the building for 
general University use. 

It was agreed that the proposal should be explored 
further, and that Chancellor Ryan should seek legislative and State 
House reactions to the plan. 

President Lederle briefly described a proposal to in- 
crease tuition scholarships for foreign students (Document T68-087) 



1 



Professional 
Theatre Pro- 
gram at UM/ 
Boston 



3112 



Tuition 
Scholarships 
for Foreign 
Students 



COMMITTEE 



Latin 
Courses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

He advised the University now grants 15 tuition scholarships. He 
compared this with five (1949) when there were 30 foreign students, 
and ten (1957) when there were 48 foreign students. The number was 
increased to the present number in 1959 when there were 60 foreign 
students. The faculty committee has recommended an increase in the 
number of tuition scholarships recognizing the fact the foreign stu 
dent population has increased to 341 (fall 1967) . The President 
pointed out that there are few undergraduates in the foreign student 
mix, while the graduate enrollment has increased. He attributed 
this to the fact that financial aid for graduate students is more 
readily available. However, he expressed the view that the time was 
right for an increase, and recommended an increase from 15 to 20. 

Chairman Troy informed the committee that Trustee Rowland 
had (in absentia) inquired about cost incurred in this increase. 
The President advised this is a waiver of tuition and not a scholar- 
ship and thus no additional appropriation is required. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees an 
increase of tuition scholarships for 
foreign students from 15 to 20 and that 
it request the committee responsible for 
reviewing tuition scholarship candidates 
to give special emphasis to granting 
tuition scholarships to undergraduate 
foreign students. 

Chancellor Ryan expressed appreciation to Chairman Troy 
and the committee for the opportunity afforded for thorough 
discussion at this very productive meeting. 

The meeting then recessed for luncheon (12:55 p.m.). 

The meeting reconvened at 1:15 p.m. 

Professor G. Lawall presented a proposal for three Latin 
courses. As a result of a survey conducted with fifty major high 
schools in Massachusetts, he reported, without exception, Latin is 
being taught in all. In addition, the Senior Supervisor of Foreign 
Languages, Mr. James Power, had informed him that Latin is taught in 
practically all high schools in Massachusetts. 

Chairman Troy reported that Trustee Plimpton had indicated 
(in absentia) his support of the current proposal. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of three Latin courses: Latin 326 (Latin Di- 
dactic Epic) , Latin 327 (Latin History and 
Biography) and Latin 328 (Latin Drama) as shown 
on attached Document T68-086. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Troy then introduced to the discussion, a list- 
ing of "Course Proposals" submitted by the Provost's Office - 
Document T68-085. 

Chairman Troy advised the committee and the members of 
the faculty present at the meeting that the Board of Trustees fre- 
quently expresses concern over course proliferation. He asked for 
specific information on number of courses dropped, number revised 
and whether the faculty screening committees were rigorous enough. 

Provost Tippo said the courses had been screened within 
the University, they had been approved and recommended by depart- 
mental, college, Graduate School and Faculty Senate committees. 

Provost Tippo reported that 52 new courses are being 
proposed at this time. Seventy-two courses were proposed last year 
These numbers of new courses should be considered against a back- 
ground of the following facts: We have over 15,000 students at 
Amherst with a yearly increase of 1,500 students. Seventy new 
courses means 5 new courses per 1,000 students -- not a large in- 
crease. Further, we have some 75 departments and programs with 55 
masters and 40 Ph.D. programs. If each department were to propose 
one new course -- not an unreasonable assumption in a growing in- 
stitution -- we would have a total of some 70 new courses per year. 
We should also bear in mind that we have over 1500 undergraduate 
majors in English alone with nearly 100 faculty members in this one 
department. We could, of course, offer 10 to 15 sections of 
Chaucer, of Milton, etc., or we can offer a diversity of courses 
with offerings in the modern novel, American drama, the Lake poets, 
etc. The students and faculty prefer the diversity of offerings 
and in any case it is no more expensive to have the diversity of 
courses than to cover the multiple sections of fewer offerings. 
And we could enlarge the argument by turning to such departments 
as History with its 700 to 800 undergraduate majors and 40-50 
faculty members. A special situation is presented by the language 
departments where several thousands of students are enrolled. Here 
again we could restrict the students to a fare of French, German 
and Spanish, but since hundreds of sections are required for this 
number of students, why not enlarge the language offerings to in- 
clude Russian, Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese, Latin, Greek, Italian 
etc.? It is no more costly and it does have the virtue of meeting 
the diverse needs of students and of society as a whole. 



Another factor to bear in mind when considering new 
courses is the fact that we add 100 new faculty positions at Amhers 
each year -- actually some 150 to 160 new people are appointed each 
year since there are retirements, deaths, resignations, leaves, 
etc. Many of these new faculty members wish to offer at least one 
course in their specialty. And it makes good educational sense to 
permit a scholar working on Emily Dickinson to offer a course on 
this important poet. Indeed, we deliberately bring in some of 
these new faculty members for the purpose of enriching and strengthen 
ing our course ^offerings. 



3113 



Course 
Proposals 
UM/ Amherst 



3114 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

A further factor which helps to explain our annual in- 
crease in courses is the youthfulness of our graduate program. Its 
present form with a full-time dean dates back only to 1962 when 
there were some 20 masters programs and fewer than a dozen Ph.D. 
curricula. There has quite naturally been a need to fill out and 
to round out this skeleton program. 

The recent explosion in knowledge and the concommitant 
development of many new areas of study have also led to the 
necessity of planning new courses. One has only to think of the 
post-war development of such areas as computer science, bio-engineer 
ing, biophysics, molecular biology, programmed learning, systems 
analysis, data retreival, area studies, etc. 

In many ways it can be argued that we should be en- 
couraging our faculty to develop new courses so that we may experi- 
ment with new fields and new combinations of disciplines. We should 
be constantly experimenting with new courses as well as new methods 
of teaching. You may well say at this point fine, but why not drop 
some of the old courses. The answer is that many should be discon- 
tinued and they will eventually disappear from the roster of courses 
But the academic profession is essentially a conservative one and 
faculty members are reluctant to drop the old before the new courses 
have demonstrated their utility and soundness. Therefore, for a 
period, we continue both the old and the new. I would venture to 
predict that in the coming five to six years, especially with the 
retirement of an increasing number of professors, we shall see the 
discontinuance of a sizable number of courses -- indeed many are not 
offered now although there is a reluctance to abolish them 
officially and permanently. 

Finally, I would like to suggest that the real administra 
tive and cost control instrument in the instruction area is the 15 
to 1 ratio (i.e., 15 students to 1 faculty). It is this ratio which 
checks and holds the University and its several schools and depart- 
ments within bounds, and not the number of courses. Given this 
effective control by the 15 to 1 ratio, I would urge that the Board 
of Trustees and its Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy 
cease to review individual courses but instead leave the approval of 
new courses to the faculties of the several colleges and schools. 
The Board and the Educational Policy Committee could then devote 
more time to review of new degree programs and curricula, to periodi 
evaluation of the effectiveness of departments, schools, and colleges 
and to academic planning for the future. I may add that I know of 
no university, public or private, where the Board of Trustees deals 
with individual courses and where the faculties do not have the 
responsibility for approval of new courses. 

Dean Hunsberger supplied to the committee, copies of 
Document T68-085, a comparison of College of Arts and Sciences 
years 1962-63 and 1967-68. He drew attention to the fact that over 
a five-year period, there has been a 257o increase in the number of 
undergraduate courses; 1207, increase in the number of graduate coursbs, 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The total increase in courses averages out to 607 o . He related 
this to the number of faculty, which was increased by 1147o, and 
averaged out to 2.25 courses per faculty member (a reduction from 
the previous 3.00; and less than comparison revealed with the 
College of Letters and Science at the University of Wisconsin, 
where the courses per faculty member were 3.30). He reported that 
our College of Arts and Sciences with 603 faculty members gives 
1355 undergraduate and graduate courses, while the College of 
Letters and Science at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, with 
1000 faculty members offers 3303 undergraduate and graduate courses 

Copies of the College of Arts and Sciences Handbook were 
supplied including copies of the Annual Report of the College of 
Arts and Sciences. Courses dropped are reported every year in the 
College of Arts and Sciences annual report. Last year a total of 
20 were discontinued. The Dean stated 807» of the courses listed 
are taught, though some are designed for alternate years. 

Dean Moore, the Dean of the Graduate School, described 
the practice at some other institutions where the Board reviewed a 
report once a year of the total changes in courses, etc. and the 
burden of course decision was left with the college and appropriate 
academic committees. 

He said at the graduate level a report is being prepared 
using ten institutions for comparisons in order to determine the 
ratio of courses to graduate faculty. 

Professor William Mellen, Chairman of the Academic Affair 
Committee, was introduced to the meeting. He stated he has served 
on this committee for three years and has found, and the committee 
is in general agreement, that the schools and colleges do such a 
good job of screening their proposals that the function of the 
committee in examining these course proposals is really no longer 
required. 

Provost Tippo asked for an explanation of why more 
courses were not dropped. Dean Moore responded that once a course 
is in a catalogue, it is not dropped until it has not been taught 
for five years. 

Provost Tippo stated there is a generally held theory 
that when a course is added, the budget cost is also increased. 
Dean Hunsberger stated the only way the budget can be increased is 
to add faculty; that the courses are not responsible for increased 
support budget, equipment, etc. 

Professor Wagner stated there is a fairly continual 
evolution going on so that in the strict sense of courses being 
dropped, over a period of 10 years a considerable number were 
dropped. However, during that 10 years, they have been revised 
over and over so that the present version is a new course. Some arc 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

formalized in terms of request for new course, some are to replace 
semester course by year course. He stated there are other aspects, 
for example, size. He cited several courses which because of their 
size may be broken down into two courses; this is one way of 
cutting down on section size. In addition, it takes a certain 
amount of variety of courses to provide the work that is necessary 
for undergraduate work, masters and Ph.D. programs. 

Dean Moore said the real control is the number of faculty. 
A faculty member can only teach so many courses. 

Chairman Troy discussed faculty distribution and the equit 
of the distribution between undergraduate and graduate courses. It 
was agreed the distribution was satisfactory. 

The Chairman invited Professor D. Bischoff to describe the 
proposed new courses in the School of Physical Education, with 
particular reference to the (240) History and Philosophy of Dance 
and (243) Dance Production and (245) Dance Composition and Notation. 

Professor Bischoff said the program was developed to meet 
the need of women and is a legitimate extension of the program. He 
stated the theatrical aspects of the dance are not offered elsewhere 
at the University and there is a great demand within Physical Educa- 
tion and outside for people who have talent in this area. He stated 
there are several qualified people on the staff able to teach. 

Discussion was held on (510) Mechanical Analysis of Human 
Motion. Professor Bischoff stated this refers to analysis of force 
and efficiency as it relates to human movement. 

Exercise Physiology Instrumentation Theory (733) was 
discussed and described as the need to develop new kinds of tools 
and instruments to measure physiological changes during periods of 
exercise. 

After Chairman Troy had gone over the entire listing of 
course proposals, school by school and course by course, and the 
appropriate department head responded to question, he stated his 
intention to suggest at some future time, to the Board of Trustees, 
that course approvals be left entirely to the appropriate faculty 
committees and that suitable reports on numbers of adds and drops 
be made once a year to the Board of Trustees. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the following new courses (Document T68-085) 
be approved. 



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The meeting was adjourned 



15 p.m. 




Robe 
Secretary 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 
May 21, 1968, 2:00 p.m., Southwest Dining Commons #7, Amherst 



PRESENT: 



Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Maginnis and 
Thompson; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Act- 
ing Dean Gagnon and Planning Officer 
O'Brien of UM at Boston; Mr. George 
Norton, Associate Director of the 
Physical Plant, UM at Amherst. 

Chairman Haigis presented a progress report on the search 
for a permanent site for the UM at Boston campus. He indicated 
that there is some reason for hope at this time that the business 
community is coming around to accepting expansion from the present 
site in a westerly direction. This may impose a limitation on the 
number of students originally planned for a core city campus, how- 
ever. The opposition of certain individuals was noted. It was 
also noted that a block, west from the 100 Arlington Street loca- 
tion, has been suggested by certain business interests, and that 
the proposed expansion in Park Square represents, perhaps, the last 
remaining realistic possibility for core city location. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that it might be possible to re- 
duce the presently agreed upon gross square foot per student 
formula, even though it is realistic. This could be achieved on 
the theory that no other core city university has utilized this 
much space during its early years. 

Chancellor Ryan reported that a total of $750,000 is now 
available to make a start on Phase III Renovations, including the 
revamping of teaching, laboratory and research areas as well as 
classrooms and other miscellaneous space. The additional sum of 
$1,560,000 has been recommended by the Governor in his capital out- 
lay message for this project. 

The Chancellor stated that the following are priority 
considerations : 

1. He needs approval of plans to utilize the 
$750,000 available. 

2. He urges that Drummey, Rosane and Anderson 
be given the green light to proceed with de- 
signs involving the 1.560 million dollars 
expected to be available in fiscal year 1969. 



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Boston 
Site 



UM/ Boston 
Renovations 



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Naming of 
Buildings, 
Roads, Malls, 
Playing Fields 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



3. There is a problem with the fourth floor 
of the Sawyer Building in terms of its 
suitability for office space due to lack 
of auditory privacy from partial partitions 
for faculty and students. It is necessary 
to lease additional faculty office space. 

There followed extensive discussion in which note was 
taken of specific proposals for renovation and alteration on the 
first, second, third, fourth, twelfth and thirteenth floors of 
building #1 (100 Arlington Street) . Special attention was given to 
the question of whether the Chancellor's Office, together with space 
for other top administrative officials of UM at Boston, should be 
retained in the permanent building at 100 Arlington Street. 
President Lederle stated that he favored preserving the gracious 
atmosphere of the present twelfth floor suite devoted to executive 
offices in the 100 Arlington Street buildings. 

At the conclusion of the discussion, it was moved, 
seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they accept the UM at Boston Phase III 
Renovations Schedule and the proposed space 
acquisition by lease, and space allocation 
at UM/Boston for the 1968-69 academic year 
as detailed in Document T68-079 with the 
exception that the Chancellor's Office and 
associated executive offices shall remain 
in building #1 at 100 Arlington Street on 
file in the Office of the Secretary. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
renovations in buildings under lease to the 
University at UM at Boston be carried out 
on the basis of the present owners contract- 
ing for the work and recovering the expenses 
through increased lease charges. 

Treasurer Johnson displayed a large map of the Amherst 
campus on which proposed names for low-rise buildings, completing 
the Southwest complex, adjacent roadways and playing fields, the 
mall to the east of Whitmore Administration Building, five dining 
halls, Machmer addition and other roads were indicated in red 
letters. 

After due consideration of the proposals, and a suggestion 
that the name of one thoroughfare be changed from boulevard to 
avenue, it was moved, seconded and unanimously 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the names indicated in red on 
Document T68-081, a large map of the 
Amherst campus which will be forwarded 
to all members of the Board, be adopted 
for the respective location as designated. 

A permanent copy of this map will be kept on file in the 
Office of the Treasurer. 

Petitions from the Director of the Associate Alumni to 
name a building and a swimming pool for living persons were re- 
ceived and placed on file for future consideration. 

Items 5 and 6 on the agenda, Life Sciences Building site 
and Acceptance of Physical Plant Building were tabled until the 
next meeting. 

Under Other Business, the Treasurer reported notification 
from Ohio that a small part of the land given to the University by 
Murray Lincoln is now required for a state highway, part as out- 
right taking and part for an easement. The State of Ohio is offer 
ing $9,100 as damages. The proposal calls for settling at $12,344 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, to negotiate with the State of 
Ohio, Department of Highways, and to execute 
appropriate documents to relinquish 2.3333 
acres in takings and .508 acres for an ease- 
ment, with retention of oil rights, on land 
given to the University by Murray D. Lincoln 
and indicated on a map on file in the Office 
of the Treasurer. 

The Treasurer having displayed for the Trustees the 
final plans for the Parking Garage, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they accept the final plans for the Park- 
ing Garage as detailed in blueprints pro- 
vided by the architectural firm of Marcel 
Breuer and Associates as prepared for the 
University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority. 

The Treasurer presented a request from the Amherst Se- 
lectmen and area residents on the necessity of closing Old Town 
Road to conform with details of the campus master plan and, it 
was moved, seconded and 



3119 



Map of 

Amherst 

Campus 



Murray D. 

Lincoln 

Land 



Parking 

Garage 

Plans 



Old Town 
Road 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Old Town Road on the north side of the 
campus be closed in accordance with a plan 
on file with the Treasurer. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:25 p.m. 




Secretary 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT AND 
UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

May 24, 1968, 12 Noon, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT : Chairman Emerson, President Lederle; 

Trustees Crowley, Healey, Maginnis, 

Gordon, Pumphret , Troy, Secretary 
McCartney 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chancellor Ryan, Dean Redfern, Joseph 
Cass, Assistant Director Labor Rela- 
tions; Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Emerson convened the meeting at 1:05 p.m. and 
invited President Lederle to comment. 

The President reviewed for the committee, the general 
public relations posture of the University. He noted that within 
recent months representatives of the major educational segment of 
the Commonwealth had held conferences at the Amherst campus. These 
included the Community College Presidents, the Board of Education, 
State College Presidents and others. 

The President advised that the Speakers' Bureau will be 
implemented and that shortly a new film will be available for 
showing in high schools and service clubs of the Commonwealth. He 
said the University Newsletter has been favorably received and 
will be issued at regular intervals. 



President Lederle 
Conference held at Amherst w 
leaders in attendance had re 
mentary letters. He advised 
attended by interested legis 
moment. After further backg 
duced Mr. Joseph Cass of the 
pressed appreciation to him 



stated that an Engineering-Science 
ith top government and industrial 
suited in many post meeting compli- 

that a Computer Center Conference, 
lators, was being held that very 
round information, the President intro- 

Labor Center to the meeting; he ex- 
for his assistance to Dean Redfern. 



Dean Redfern then reported that the Board of Higher Edu- 
cation had approved establishment of a Dental School at the Medi- 
cal School in Worcester. 

In addition, the Dean advised that the Bill to establish 
a Law School at the Amherst Campus is now in Ways and Means 
Committee of the Legislature and this also has received the im- 
primatur of the BHE. Preliminary planning can now be initiated. 

Brief discussion was held on the Operating Budget in 
which Chancellor Ryan joined. The Chancellor said the House Ways 
and Means Committee increased the original appropriation of 



312 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

$100,000 to $200,000 in order to provide needed equipment for the 
UM/Boston program. 

Future plans were discussed and included the need for a 
Trespass Bill. President Lederle advised that the BHE had filed a 
bill to provide control of trespass on college campuses so as to pro 
vide a sounder legal basis for dealing with interlopers; the bill 
was given 'next annual session' . If is planned to refile this 
vital bill. 

The Dean reported on Continuing Education, stating a 
plethora of bills in this area (evening courses, etc.) make it im- 
perative that a budget request be included for funds to insure 
acceleration of this program. He noted that Title I money is avail- 
able from the Federal government. 

Educational TV has a #1 priority on the FCC application 
for license, the Dean advised. It is important that every effort be 
made to get this program funded. Secretary McCartney said the enact 
ment of S.267 in the last session of the Legislature provided for 
the establishment of an ETV Center and it is imperative now that 
capital appropriations for the establishment of the center be se- 
cured in the 1969 capital budget, in order to allow the University 
to stay in the picture at the Federal level for matching funds. 

The subject of Faculty Fringe Benefits has been referred 
to a Task Force. President Lederle said the benefits originally 
were keyed to retirement. He noted that the State plan is a good 
one, but is non-vesting. Further reports will be forthcoming. 

The President informed the committee that plans are under- 
way to coordinate the student legislative day with the University's 
fall program for official Legislative Day. He said also the seminar 
for Freshman Legislators would be formalized and probably become an 
established program at the campus. 

Dean Redfern advised the committee of two laudatory scrolls 
received by Chancellor Ryan from the House and Senate. 

Trustee Gordon called for an outside look at the Univer- 
sity's legislative relations. He said he had talked with George W. 
Bonham, President of Science and University Affairs, a consulting 
firm specializing in higher education, and that Mr. Bonham had, in 
response to his solicitation outlined on August 9, 1967, a proposal 
for a study of our institution. 

Trustee Gordon moved, seconded, and it was 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the President communicate with Mr. Bonham 
and if possible arrange an early meeting of 
the Government and University Relations 
Committee, at which Mr. Bonham or an 
associate could describe the proposal in 
detail and indicate how this firm could 
help on our problems. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:15 p.m. 




Rob, 
Secreta 



J. McCartney 
Board of Trusl 




3124 



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Student 
Senate 
Budget Act 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
May 31, 1968, 10:00 a.m., Whitmore Administration Bldg., Amherst 



PRESENT : Chairman Lyons, President Lederle; Trustees 
Emerson, Gordon. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Treasurer Johnson, 
Dean Field, Associate Dean of Students Noffsinger, 
Acting Coordinator of Student Activities Scanlon; 
Miss Olken, Messrs. Silverman and Hartwell (Stu- 
dent Representatives). Miss Coulter. 



The meeting was convened at 10:30 a.m. Copies of the Student 
Senate Budget Act having been supplied to the committee in advance 
of the meeting, discussion opened with a brief summary by the Dean 
of Students. 

Dean Field said the budget had been thoroughly reviewed with 
the staff and its acceptance recommended. He drew attention to 
two or three major issues within the budget and discussion ensued. 

It was noted that one of the major new appropriations was the 
Martin Luther King Social Action Fund ($41,000). This amounted to 
$3,238 per capita. In addition, the Campus Humor Magazine and 
Afro-Americans, ($2,842 and $1,073 respectively) resulted in an 
additional .224c and .085c respectively, per capita. The Martin 
Luther King Fund will be disbursed according to RSO established 
policy. All under-privileged groups in the Commonwealth will be 
considered for this program without regard to race, color or creed 
The organization will work with the student Afro-American organiza- 
tion to avoid duplication of effort. 

The Provost questioned procedure in the event of student chal- 
lenge of any assessment within the budget. Senate President 
Silverman and Vice President Hartwell responded. They described 
the routine procedures provided in the Student Government Constitu- 
tion, including the possibility of a referendum and opportunity 
for students to vote. It would require a 2/3 majority vote to 
defeat a disputed measure. 



Discussion was held on the legal st 
the Student Senate and collection of a s 
sity, based on the Budget Act. Treasure 
letter containing a preliminary opinion 
Broadhurst. Counsel indicated the possi 
the student tax, and although certain as 
upheld, when one moves into the broader 
to be challenged and may then be subject 



atus of the assessment by 
tudent tax by the Univer- 
r Johnson circulated a 
prepared by Attorney Austin 
bility of question about 
pects would probably be 
social areas, it is likely 
to contrary decision. The 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer stated that the student tax levied through the Student 
Senate is acceptable as long as it is voluntary, but he questioned 
its enforcement in the event of a student's refusal to pay. 

President Lederle advised that the New York State Board of 
Regents had reportedly decided to support student taxes as levied, 
reversing their previous stand. He suggested further investigation 
of the entire subject, affording additional opportunity for counsel 
to extend their research. 

It was noted that no Trustee action is required on the student 
budget. The administration is involved only to the extent that the 
students have no machinery for collecting the tax, and traditionally 
this function has been incorporated within the usual University 
billing process. 

The Treasurer noted the fact that part of the action antici- 
pated in the MLK Fund expenditure would take place off the campus, 
representing a major departure, in that the student tax has pre- 
viously supported only "on campus" activities. The student repre- 
sentatives cited precedents for off-campus expenditures and acti- 
vities, including the Belchertown and Northampton Volunteer pro- 
grams . 

Mr. Scanlon, Acting Coordinator of Student Activities, ex- 
pressed confidence that further research and a subsequent opinion 
from legal counsel would hold the tax procedure entirely tenable. 
In the event of any reaction, the matter would be dealt with 
through usual student government channels. 

Provost Tippo pointed out that the student budget is not 
usually a matter for Trustee consideration. However, it was felt 
advisable to alert the committee to the possibility of future 
repercussions, due to the nature and size of the MLK Fund appro- 
priation. The Dean of Students said the appropriation is an evi- 
dence of the students' good faith and desire to help in this great 
problem. It is a translation of student concern into something 
worthwhile. 

President Lederle concluded that he will approve the Student 
Senate Budget. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:00 a.m. 



O X v i 




Rober 
Secretar 




McCartney 
oard of Trust 



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Medical 
School 
Preliminary 
Plans 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
May 31, 1968, 11:00 a.m., Southwest Dining Commons #7, Amherst 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT : 



Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Croce, Crowley, Emerson, 
Frechette, Gordon, Maginnis, Thompson, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Dean 
Soutter, Acting Dean Gagnon, Planning 
Officer O'Brien; Mr. Frank D. Gediman, 
Project Engineer, BBC; UM/Hospital Ad- 
ministrator King; UM/Consultant 
Hamilton; UM/Medical School Associate 
Dean Stockwell; Messrs. R. Scott Ouinlan, 
Architect, Campbell, Aldrich & Nulty; 
D. H. Ramseth, Architect, Ellerbe 
Associates; Donald Ritchie, Architect, 
Ritchie Associates, Inc.; Peter Moyes, 
Architect, Ritchie Associates; and 
Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 11:00 a.m. The 
first item was consideration of revised preliminary plans for the 
Medical School Hospital in Worcester. 

The Dean of the Medical School introduced the architects, 
consultants and members of his staff present to the committee. 
Associate Dean Stockwell then reviewed the planned uses of the 
building floor by floor as shown on a series of wall charts. He 
indicated where changes had been made to reduce the size of the 
structure and incorporate recommendations brought about by visit of 
the federal site committee several months ago. The provisions for 
expansion were shown as unfinished areas. A reduction in cost of 
$1 million was effected by removal of 20,000 square feet from the 
original plan. Eliminated were provision for a laundry and two 
elevators within the Medical School building. One bay was removed 
from every floor. 

Colored slides were projected of the outside of the pro- 
posed building. The committee was oriented through descriptions 
supplied by Messrs. Moyes and Ritchie of Ritchie Associates. 
Mr. Ritchie stated the plans meet all of the criteria and provide ndt 
only for immediate needs, but also for future growth as the hospital 
increases in capacity. 

Dean Soutter responded to questions. He stated that all 
patients will receive identical care. The only "extra" a private 
patient will receive will be more privacy. Expansion from 400 beds 
to 600 beds will be possible through the vertical addition of four 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



floors. Additional expansion to 1200 beds is possible by adding 
another wing to the building. The Dean stated it is difficult to 
equate space and cost since we are originating a new campus. All 
of the basic services must be originated there. He noted with 
reference to the cost factor that comparisons with new buildings 
elsewhere are variable. Construction expenses in other sections 
of the country vary widely - as in New York and Arizona for example 

Dean Soutter stated some of the hospital facilities are 
larger than needed for 400 beds because they had to be planned to 
allow for expansion. It would be nearly impossible to provide such 
facilities at the time of a later need. 

Mr. James Hamilton (consultant) stated that, in addition 
to the cost of the building, consideration must be given to the 
operating cost. He drew attention to the fact that the hospital is 
economically designed to supply horizontal and vertical transport. 
Mr. Stockwell reported that, to his knowledge, at least six univer- 
sities had constructed buildings which proved later to be in- 
adequate to the need. 



After further discussion, on motion made and seconded. 



it was 



312 



& 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of preliminary plans for the 
University Hospital at the Medical 
School in Worcester. 

Dean Soutter then described for the committee the 
property at Belmont and Lake Streets in Worcester purchased for use 
by the medical students. He detailed the repairs and alterations 
needed to convert this combination store-office-warehouse building 
into laboratories, a library and needed ancillary utility areas. 

The Dean stated the alterations should be made so that 
this facility may be used by the Commonwealth for another 20 years 
for basic courses in sciences, the humanities, and other practical 
instruction in the para medical fields. 

Mr. Ouinlan of Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty then showed 
colored slides of the property and indicated the proposed changes. 
He outlined the plans, including a change in the main entrance to 
allow access to the parking area. He stated that through the gas 
fired air system it will be possible to add air conditioning at a 
later date should the need arise. He indicated the library area 
and the access from the laboratory area and also the dining area, 
noting that meals would be catered. The second floor will house 
the administration. He stated that plans have been made to 
accommodate the initial Medical School program requirements within 
the existing layout. Thus, the cost, including demolition, has 
been held within the budget total, and should amount to less than 
one million dollars. 



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UM/ Bos ton 
Site 

Progress 
Report 



Civil War 
Memorabilia 
UM/ Boston 
Library 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After discussion and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of plans for renovation of the 
building at Belmont and Lake Streets in 
Worcester for use by the UM Medical 
School. 

Chairman Haigis presented a progress report on the search 
for a UM at Boston permanent site. He stated that a planned meeting 
for Monday with the BRA and the Mayor had been unexpectedly can- 
celled due to the illness of the Mayor's representative. It has 
been rescheduled for next week. Chairman Haigis advised that the 
BRA will meet to explore the possibilities inherent in the availa- 
bility of Statler Hilton Hotel. However, the University committee 
has had no official negotiations in this sphere. 

The Chairman then advised of an offer by the Massachusetts 
Commandery of the Loyal Legion of an extensive collection of Civil 
War memorabilia, including the largest existing collection of photo- 
graphs by Civil War photographer Matthew Brady, for the UM/Boston 
Library, now housed in the Armory. He stated that no acquisition 
cost is entailed. The collection had been housed in the Armory. 
Now that the University has acquired this building for use as a 
library, it can appropriately remain there within the University 
care. 

In response to question, Chancellor Ryan responded that 

there would be no maintenance problem (and if there 
were it would be worth it) 

the nature of the transaction is a "permanent loan." 

the degree of protective care required is "the same 
as that given all University property" 

the need for a caveat clause in letter of acceptance 
is precluded by terms of the letter of offer (see 
attached), which set out the full agreement. 

After thorough discussion, a motion was made and seconded, 
and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they accept the Massachusetts 
Commandery of the Loyal Legion's offer 
of a collection of Civil War memorabilia, 
as detailed in Document T68-090 attached 
to these minutes. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Haigis then advised the committee of a letter 
received from the University 4-H group proposing to name the area 
in front of two relocated buildings (Farley and Bowditch Club 
Houses) as the Horace M. Jones Memorial, in honor of this former 
state 4-H leader who gave years of distinguished service to the 
University. 



After discussion, motion was made and seconded, and it 



was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the area directly in front of the 
Farley and Bowditch 4-H Club Houses be 
designated the Horace M. Jones Memorial 
Garden in accordance with a plan on 
file with the Treasurer. 

Chancellor Ryan referred to the priority considerations 
outlined in the minutes of May 21, 1968. He stated it is 
necessary now to obtain additional leased space (Item 3) and that 
Planning Officer O'Brien has secured estimates of cost of the items 
presented. 

It was agreed in the interest of clarification to reword 
the minutes of Item 3 and the concommitant vote to reflect the 
leasing requirement as immediate and necessary and present the 
corrected vote to the Board of Trustees. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:00 noon. 



312Q 



Horace M. 
Jones 
Memorial 
Garden 





Robertfytf. McCartney 
Secretary //Board of Trustees 




3130 



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George 
Bonham 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

JOINT MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE AND COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT 

AND UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

June 17, 1968, 12 Noon, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT : Vice Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Emerson, Haigis, Lyons, 
Pumphret, Troy; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 

BY 

INVITATION : Trustee Gordon 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Dean Redfern; Mr. G. W. Bonham, President, 

Science and University Affairs; Miss Coulter. 

Chairman Emerson of the Committee on Government and Uni- 
versity Relations convened the meeting at 1:00 p.m. 

Mr. George W. Bonham, President of Science and University 
Affairs, was introduced to the meeting. He briefly described the 
background and experience of his company and its qualifications to 
undertake a study of the University's government and legislative 
relations. He stated the organization is approximately two and a 
half years old. It works only in the field of higher education in 
the areas of public affairs and communications. It does no fund 
raising. He advised that his organization never supplies answers, 
but can offer some views on what an outsider considers the problems 
to be. Some assistance could then be given by supplying a compari- 
son of the University's activities with those of institutions in 
other states. Possibly some suggestions for improvement could be 
made. Mr. Bonham stated his organization had worked with the State 
University of New York and the City University of New York, among 
others. 

Trustee Pumphret pointed out that any review of relations 
should not be limited to the Legislature, but should encompass also 
the Executive Department of the Commonwealth. Review should also be 
given to "putting the business of higher education across to the 
public." The total governmental situation (including Washington) 
should be included in these considerations. 

Mr. Bonham expressed the opinion that the quality of the 
PR effort at the University, and access to the President had been 
very good. He indicated, for example, that he had consulted with 
the Press in the Boston area and that their estimate of the Uni- 
versity's information services in Amherst stood "very high." He 
then sketched an initial proposal of what the proposed short-term 
study would entail. 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Conferences would be held with all University administra- 
tors having relations with officials of the Commonwealth and the 
Legislature. Interviews would also be held with people in and out 
of the General Court; with the education committee; also persons 
concerned with manpower, commerce and civil rights. Interviews 
would be held with all areas of state government and with people 
concerned with education. Mr. Bonham stated he had never encountered 
resistance on the part of members of a Legislature or others to a 
study of this nature. He does not anticipate any problem, should 
such a study be authorized in Massachusetts. 

A review of the University's effort to inform the legis- 
lative and taxpayer constituencies would be made and compared with 
the best legislative relations programs conducted by other public 
universities in the country. Following this, recommendations would 
be made as to the best procedure to generate and maintain support 
for the University's future financial requirements. 

Discussion followed. Evaluation of the University's 
acceptance by the private sector, the need to inform the socio- 
economic leaders of the community to the University, were considered 
Mr. Bonham said the University suffers from under-recognition, as 
do many other state universities. The answer may or may not lie in 
additional national publicity, which sometimes creates greater 
local acceptance. 

In response to question, Mr. Bonham stated he could think 
of no other state which could be considered sufficiently similar to 
Massachusetts and its problems so that the experiences of that 
state could be equated at this time. From many points of view, 
Massachusetts presents unique problems. The results of the pro- 
posed study, however, should provide a goal line. Included would 
be : 

1 . assessment of facts 

2. comparison with experiences in other states 

3. set of recommendations 

In terms of time, budgets, what it would take to do the 
job (dollars and personnel) , M . Bonham stated that his schedule 
would allow time between July 15 and the end of August. The budget 
should not be great. Finally, a panel of three or four persons 
working with Mr. Bonham would aid in the program. 

In response to a request for a definitive proposal, Mr. 
Bonham suggested a meeting with President Lederle at which time full 
discussion could be held and the final form of a proposal firmed up. 
He agreed there would be no fee involved for this meeting. 

The sense of the meeting was that a tentative proposal 
would be submitted to the committee within the week, and it would be 
available for submission to the meeting of the Board on June 28. 



3131 



3132 



COMMITTEE 



Subsidiary 
Accounts - 
Transfers 
Between 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was agreed that President Lederle, Dean Redfern and 
Mr. Bonham* would meet and confer on the outline of the proposal 
following this meeting. 

Dean Redfern briefly apprised the meeting of current 
legislative matters pertinent to the University. He stated the 
capital budget had passed the House, with deductions of 3%. He 
noted that planning money had been cut in four areas. Efforts 
have been made unsuccessfully to have these funds restored. A 
meeting with the Ways and Means Committee is now scheduled to see 
what restoration is possible. 

The deficiency budget has reached the House; action is 
pending. With reference to the Law School, the Dean said, legal 
authority to proceed is at hand, but the project lacks supporting 
funds . 

Acting Chairman Healey of the Executive Committee then 
asked Treasurer Johnson to present and explain a listing of pro- 
posed transfers between subsidiary accounts. 

Treasurer Johnson stated that since the deficiency bill 
did not provide funds for the items listed, it has become necessary 
to make transfers. Supplemental appropriations requested for 
summer school teachers' salaries, payable in June, 1968, were not 
provided. Thus the only way to meet the summer school payroll is 
to transfer the funds from those accounts reserved for terminal pay 
for academic year teachers who are leaving the University, but whose 
annual salaries were spread over the full 12 months ending 
August 31, 1968. Normal practice would be to pay them their July 
and August salaries in June, on termination. Now it will be 
necessary to defer payments until July, 1968. 

In addition, Treasurer Johnson stated the supplemental 
appropriations requested to pay the telephone bills and year-end 
postage (such as mailing 11,000 student grades) had not been 
recommended or appropriated at this time. Bills must be paid before 
June 30. Emergency action is required, and funds committed in -08, 
-15 and -16 accounts will be unencumbered and commitments shifted in 
-08 to dormitory accounts where electricity and water was consumed. 
The expenditures in -15 and -16 will be deferred until next year or 
the orders cancelled. While this procedure is entirely legal, the 
Treasurer pointed out that it is not a desirable practice and is 
now being recommended reluctantly in order to solve an emergency 
situation. After consideration, there being no objection, motion 
was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of transfers between subsidiary accounts as 
listed below: 



-'Secretary McCartney was also in attendance 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Account 1350-01 Amherst 
From: 01-salaries, permanent positions 
02-salaries, temporary positions 

To: 03-salaries, non-employees 

From: 08-heat, light, water, etc. 
15-equipment 
16-rentals 



To: 



14-administrative expense 



$113,000 

37,000 

$150,000 

$150,000 

$ 35,000 

25,000 

4,000 

$ 64,000 

$ 64,000 



3133 



President Lederle briefly commented on persons under con- 
sideration for a commencement speaker for 1969. At the suggestion 
of Vice Chairman Healey, the matter was put over for further 
informal discussion until the meeting of June 28. 

Next, there was discussion of the procedure by which a 
new Chancellor for the UM at Boston will be screened and selected. 
It was agreed that the Executive Committee will be responsible for 
the establishment of this procedure. 

President Lederle informed the meeting that the ad hoc 
Faculty Committee on Selection of a Chancellor has held six sessions 
and accumulated a large list of names. This list has subsequently 
been reduced somewhat. It is subject to change. The President 
stated that the Trustees, through the Executive Committee, should 
be kept completely informed of the proceedings of the faculty 
screening committee. Chairman Healey agreed. It was also agreed 
that the Executive Committee and the full Board would have an 
opportunity to consider and meet the final candidates when the 
established processes had been followed. The President stated he 
would participate personally in every interview, and keep the 
Board fully informed. 

A listing of persons considered desirable (although not 
established as active candidates for the Chancellorship) was 
supplied to the members of the Executive Committee. Two draft pro- 
posals on criteria for a Chancellor, one prepared by the committee, 
and the second by a student committee, were also supplied - 
Documents T68-093 and T68-094. 

Chairman Healey recommended the following procedure for 
evaluating and screening of persons under consideration for the 
Chancellorship of UM at Boston: 

1. Listing of possibilities (by President's Faculty 

Committee and others) 

2. Interviews by President's Committee 

3. Final list of five names to be submitted to 

Executive Committee 

4. Personal interview with finalists by Executive 

Committee (and other Trustees who wish to join) 

5. Additional suggestions by members of Executive 

Committee (this seems desirable) 



Chancellor, 
UM/ Bos ton 
Criteria 



3134 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Lederle advised that he has encouraged members 
of the selection committee to contact people for suggestions. 
Also, there would be no objection to members of the Board doing 
likewise . 

Discussion was held on whether criteria for the Chancelbr 
ship should be established prior to assembling a list, or whether 
in fact a list should be compiled and criteria then applied in the 
process of reduction of the list. Chairman Healey stated that the 
first consideration is to develop a list of five promising candi- 
dates for the Executive Committee. The criteria can then be 
applied. He said the Executive Committee should have the reserve 
poser to add another name or two to the list. Trustees should be 
able to approach persons they believe desirable for the Chancellor- 
ship, but they should not commit the President's committee as to a 
decision. 

It was agreed that, although the full Board is not in- 
volved in the interviewing, individual members of the Board should 
consider themselves invited to join the committee at the pertinent 
meeting when selection will be made. 

The President commented briefly on the current list 
supplied to the Trustees. He stated the students at UM/Boston 
will have an opportunity to talk with anyone brought on for inter- 
view. 

Chairman Healey stated the full Board would be brought up 
to date on these discussions at the meeting of June 28, 1968. v 

There was no report on the search for a permanent site 
for the UM/Boston campus. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:50 p.m. 




Robert J 
Secretary, Bo 



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COMMITTEE 



I 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
June 19, 1968, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; Trustees 

Haigis, Lyons and Rowland, Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Acting Dean 
Gagnon, Deans: Allen, Hunsberger, Moore 
and Spielman; Vice Dean Maki; Associate 
Dean Wagner; Assistant to the Provost 
Venman; Professors: Feng, Foster, Lee, 
McCleary, Mellen and Skrinde. 



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Troy at 
11:15 a.m. 

In order to discuss the first order of business, a 
petition from Professor Richard C. McCleary of the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston, the Chairman set forth the order of pro- 
cedure for discussion on this case, turned over the chair to 
Trustee Rowland, and continued at the meeting as a member of the 
committee . 

The issue concerned the term of appointment of Professor 
McCleary, together with an appeal on his part to the Committee that 
he be granted tenure. 

The Committee had before it and gave full consideration 
to the various transcripts and reports of the several committees 
of the faculty at UM/Boston which had previsously considered this 
matter. 

Long discussion ensued in which statements were made by 
Professor McCleary, fey Chancellor Ryan and Acting Dean Gagnon, and 
by President Lederle. There was a thorough exchange of views among 
the Trustees. 

At the conclusion of this extended debate, during which 
all of the main points relating to the petition of Professor 
McCleary were brought out in detail, Trustee Troy moved that the 
Committee recommend to the Board of Trustees that tenure be granted 
to Professor McCleary. 

There was no second to the motion and no further action 
was taken. 

Provost Tippo noted that the practice in many universities 
in the nation as to leave decisions affecting development and 
authorization of new courses solely ± n the hands of the faculty and 



313" 



Petition 
from Pro- 
fessor 
Richard C. 
McCleary 



3 136 



COMMITTEE 



New Courses 
UM/Amherst, 
handled by 
faculty and 
administration 



Proposal to 
Modify Certain 
Core 

Curriculum 
Requirements 



Ph.D. in 
Anthropology 



Lectureships. 
School of 
Education 
UM/Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

administration, while the Board of Trustees considers the matter of 
establishing new programs and academic projects of a major order of 
magnitude. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
VOTED : That henceforth the review of single new 
courses be left to the faculty and ad- 
ministration, with the understanding that 
an annual report will be made each year to 
the Trustees in which the number of new 
courses added and the number withdrawn will 
be stated; and, further, that all new degree 
programs and new curricula will be taken to 
the Trustees for approval in conformance with 
current practice. 

Dean Moyer Hunsberger of the College of Arts and Sciences 
presented the rationale for a proposal to modify certain core 
curriculum requirements; specifically, options for Speech 101 and 
English 125/126 for College of Arts and Sciences students. 

After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 
it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the proposal to modify core 
curriculum requirements for College of Arts 
and Sciences and other University students 
(option for Speech 101 and English 125/126) 
as detailed in T68-095, which document is made 
a part of these minutes. 

A proposal to establish a Ph.D. in Anthropology at UM/ 
Amherst was explained in detail by Professor Everett S. Lee, Head 
of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the Ph.D. degree be authorized and established 
in the field of Anthropology. (Document T68-098) 

Dean Dwight Allen of the School of Education explained 
for the committee a proposal to establish two lectureships in the 
School of Education at UM/Amherst. 

Dean Allen reported that there is a special government 
training act which allows government employees to take a leave of 
absence with pay to further their professional training. In essence 
the government subsidizes the training program. The two proposed 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Lectureships would be 1-year appointments in education for persons 
in the middle ranges of government service who would combine 
advanced training with some service to the University. They would 
teach one course each semester and take substantial graduate work 
which might or might not be a part of a formal academic program. 
Each lectureship would carry with it a $2,000 award, and an award 
citation. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

two named lectureships be established in the 
School of Education, each carrying with it a 
$2,000 award and an award citation; the first to 
be named The Horace Mann Lectureship in Public 
Education Policy; and the second, to be named 
The John Quincy Adams Lectureship in Inter- 
national Education Development. 

Dean Allen next explained a proposal to establish a 
Center for the Study of Educational Innovations at the UM in Amherst 
The Dean explained that the School presently has a grant of 
$100,000 to study new curriculum revisions in education, and this 
may lead to further federal subsidies amounting to $1 million per 
year for a five-year period. Establishment of the Center for Study 
of Educational Innovations would permit the School of Education to 
pursue grant support systematically. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they establish at the UM in Amherst a 
Center for Study of Educational Innovations 
in the School of Education. 

In conclusion, Dean Allen reported to the committee his 
strong feelings that the University should have a Ph.D. program in 
Education. This prospect, he stated, will be studied in detail 
during the coming year along with a general review and evaluation 
of the undergraduate curriculum. The proposal has the concurrence 
of Dean Moore of the Graduate School who observed that it is a 
common practice in the best Schools of Education to have the Ph.D. 
degree available along with the Ed.D. degree (93 major universities 
in the United States presently offer the Ph.D. degree in Education) . 

Dean Spielman presented the rationale for establishing an 
Interdepartmental Program in International Agricultural Studies at 
the UM/ Amherst. This would involve undergraduates, would add a fifth 
year to the curriculum, and would involve one year spent abroad. 

Dean Spielman enlarged upon his hopes to get Peace Corps 
support for sending students and faculty abroad. In turn, the 
Peace Corps would hope to get academic credit incentive as an 



3i :\ 



Center for 
the Study of 
Educational 
Innovations 

UM/ Amherst 



Ph.D. in 
Education 



Interdepart- 
mental Program 
in International 
Agricultural 
Studies 
UM/ Amherst 



3138 



COMMITTEE 



Report on 
Environmental 
Engineering 
option in 
Civil Engineer- 
ing Deparment, 
UM/ Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



additional benefit and attraction for volunteers involved in 
certain work abroad. The Peace Corps volunteer term is 27 months; 
the Corps is particularly interested in the availability of graduate 
credit. There will be a particular emphasis on programs in Africa 
because of the University's experience there. 

It was then moved, seconded and unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

an Interdepartmental Program in International 
Agricultural Studies be authorized and 
established at the University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst. (Document T68-099) 

Professor Tsuan Hua Feng of the Department of Civil 
Engineering next reported on the Environmental Engineering option in 
the Civil Engineering Department, UM at Amherst. He noted that we 
emphasized the Ph.D. and M.S. degrees and also research in this 
area. The reason for the option is that we now have a requirement 
taking two and one-half years to qualify for admission to the Ph.D. 
degree in Civil Engineering. However, there is no need for so long 
a time to be spent in the Environmental Engineering option. Thus, 
the department will be able to reduce the number of prerequisites. 
No voted was requested. (Document T68-100) 

President Lederle commented briefly on the desirability 
of establishing a University System-Wide Committee on Graduate Work 
UM at Boston will be providing graduate programs in the foreseeable 
future, and there is a need to have a pan-University group repre- 
sentative of faculty and administrators from all segments of the 
system to focus upon such problems as when or when not to establish 
certain curricula, advanced degrees, etc. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p.m. 




Robe 
Secretar 




J. McCartney 
Board of Trustea 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
June 19, 1968, 12:30 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Room 407, Boston 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Pumphret, Trustees Crowley, 
Frechette, Treasurer Johnson. 



Associate Treasurer Brand; Mr. E. H. 
Ladd of Standish, Ayer & Wood, Inc. 
and Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting at 1:00 p.m. and 
invited Mr. Ladd of Standish, Ayer & Wood, Inc. to comment and pre- 
sent recommendations on the Endowment and Operating Fund of the 
University. 

Mr. Ladd briefly reviewed the general market conditions 
of the day and the perspective as to the future. He expressed 
optimism for modified growth over the next four quarters, at a 
declining rate, due to the federal tax bill (which it is assumed 
the House will pass) and the inventory accumulation due to the steel 
situation, among other factors. Mr. Ladd stated the expansion in 
GNP is attributable in some measure to price advances rather than 
real income. Inflation is a crucial problem. Three major problems 
are (1) shortage of skilled labor, which impedes expansion of pro- 
duction (2) shortage of capital (3) confusing international 
financial structure, due to continued pressure on the pound, the 
dollar and gold. The wage cost increase, with only minor pro- 
ductivity increase, creates an enormous industry cost; he predicted 
that in the next four quarters corporate profits will reach a 
plateau and be down somewhat after taxes. 

Mr. Ladd felt common stocks will produce a much better 
ultimate return than bonds. High quality moderate growth common 
stock is within the realm of reason so far as price is concerned, 
but very high growth stock and speculative stocks are something 
else again. Any index comparing high growth to traditional would 
indicate that the growth stocks have moved up very sharply compared 
to others. The prevailing trend is toward growth stocks. 

Mr. Ladd expressed satisfaction with the current Endowment 
Fund situation, which shows approximately 60% in common stocks. A 
comparison of the "Portfolio Policy of College Endowment Funds" 
revealed that the University is in line with other colleges and 
universities listed and is generally in line with the traditional 
thinking. 

Consideration of the Bond program followed. Mr. Ladd 
reported that the portfolio is well spaced. He encouraged con- 
tinuance of the short term position and a good commitment in long 
term bonds, but felt relatively few intermediates were advisable. 
Mr. Ladd stated that many Endowment Funds were setting up separate 

funds to engage in speculative activity, in order to increase 



3139 



Endowment 
and 

Operating 
Fund 



3140 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

capital. He questioned whether the committee policy would be to 
move in the direction of high growth stocks when the time appeared 
appropriate. He expressed some reservations about such a policy, 
pointing out the risks, but stated he had no strong feeling pro or 
con. This would be an appropriate time to make such a move, if one 
were contemplated. 

Chairman Pumphret agreed that consideration should be ex- 
tended, after full discussion, at some future meeting. 

Discussion on growth stocks followed. Mr. Ladd described 
six or seven industries of interest, where prospects for above 
average growth seem assured. The Proposed Common Stock Program 
(copies supplied to committee) and the recommendations incorporated 
therein were explained. 

In response to question, Mr. Ladd stated consideration of 
additional Certificates of Deposit is not possible at the present 
time, due to unavailability of cash. He noted that the savings 
banks deposits are in "notice accounts" and not flexible. 
Treasurer Johnson advised the cash position will be improved in 
late August or September, at which time action may be initiated. 

Associate Treasurer Brand distributed copies of "Operat- 
ing Fund Balance as of May 31, 1968." Discussion followed. 

Mr. Brand stated renewal of the CD with the Commerce Bank 
& Trust Co. is on a three month basis, at 5% and should be renewed 
at not less than 6% or invested elsewhere at 6\% for a longer period 
He requested policy direction on whether certificates of deposit 
should be used as a major source of investment, or whether other 
federal agencies or banks should be utilized. Mr. Ladd stated this 
would be dependent upon yield relationship at the time of invest- 
ment and recommended deferring decision until the funds became 
available. 

Trustee Crowley questioned the large balance carried in 
the operating fund ($5 million) . Treasurer Johnson advised that 
these are balances available in several hundred different trust 
funds, grants, contracts and so forth but includes no state funds. 
The total fluctuates from $3 million up to $6% million at the peak 
period in the fall. 

There was discussion of sums of money to be deposited in 
banks. The Treasurer stated he would like to have some direction 
on banks in which to deposit small sums. It was agreed to postpone 
discussion on this matter until Trustee Healey could be reached to 
secure the benefit of his banking experience. 

The members of the committee expressed approbation of the 
presentation made by the Treasurer and Mr. Ladd. It was the con- 
sensus that the meetings should be held more often and should in- 
clude consideration of the budget. 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Endowment Fund Holdings were considered and discussed 
Special reference was made to the "Bartlett" preferred stock listing. 
The Treasurer explained this unique situation and stated it is not 
an acquisition attributable to Standish, Ayer & Wood, Inc. This is 
a closely held family company and has been the subject of personal 
follow up by the Treasurer's Office. At an advantageous time, 
appropriate action will be taken. 



After further discussion and on motion made and seconded, 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Treasurer of the University, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, be authorized to execute the changes 
in the University's investment portfolio as 
recommended by Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc. 

Associate Treasurer Brand advised that 400 Rights had 
been received from the Baltimore Gas & Electric Company. Mr. Ladd 
suggested that they be sold since they represent eight (8) shares 
of preferred stock. The value of a Right is about 12c. 

With reference to the $25,000 U.S. Treasuries 3 3/4 
maturing August 15, 1968, it was agreed to defer recommendations as 
to disposition of these funds until they mature. Mr. Ladd will 
submit recommendations in a letter to the Trustees. 

Copies of a memorandum incorporating the comments of the 
Treasurer on the State Audit Report were supplied to the committee 
(Document T68-096) . Chairman Pumphret stated the entire report of 
the Auditor should be considered. He said the University comes out 
extremely well after review by the Auditor and the administration 
is to be commended. He felt the report should be thoroughly 
absorbed and discussed however. It was decided that it should be 
the subject of a special meeting. The Chairman then recommended 
that the Treasurer's comments should be read at the individual's 
convenience. 

Treasurer Johnson submitted a recommendation that the 
Ilene Sharon Saval Trust Fund, in the amount of $1,736, be 
established as an endowment fund (See Document T68-097) . After 
discussion and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
ILENE SHARON SAVAL SCHOLARSHIP (TRUST) FUND in 
the amount of $1,736.00 be established as an en- 
dowment fund for the purpose of awarding annually 
one or more scholarships in the amount of $100 
to an entering student or students at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, said students to be 



3141 



Johnson, 

Kenneth W. 

authorized 

execute 

changes in 

investment 

portfolio 



to 



Auditor' s 
Report 



Ilene 

Sharon 

Saval 

Scholarship 

Fund 



3142 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



from the city of Revere, Massachusetts (or 
elsewhere in the state if no qualified stu- 
dent from Revere can be found) ; awards shall 
be made to students considered worthy and 
needy as determined by the University Com- 
mittee on Scholarships and Financial Aid. 
Any excess income remaining after annual 
awards have been made shall be added to 
the principal. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:00 p.m. 



' 




Robe^ 
Secretary 




t/ J. McCartney 
Board of Trust 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 

June 28, 1968, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Gordon and Thompson; 
Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Dean 
Soutter; Acting Dean Gagnon, UM/B; 
Planning Officer O'Brien, UM/B; 
Mr. James Kelso, Executive Vice Presi- 
dent, Boston Chamber of Commerce; 
Mr. Charles Hilgenhurst, BRA 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 11:10 a.m. 
Mr. Hilgenhurst of the Boston Redevelopment Authority was invited 
to display a map of areas adjacent to the North Station in Boston. 

Extensive discussion followed concerning the site feasi- 
bility for a permanent campus for UM at Boston, on approximately 
20 acres adjacent to the present North Station site. Acquisition 
of additional parcels of land at a future time might raise the 
ultimate site to approximately 32 acres. Considered were: trans- 
portation, access, availability and aesthetics. Messrs. Kelso and 
Hilgenhurst both urged the committee to recommend that this site 
be explored in depth. 

There followed a brief review of the Park Square area as 
a potential site. Mr. Hilgenhurst pointed out that only 7 to 10 
acres would be available, and that it was the opinion of the BRA 
that the University's program would have to be seriously curtailed 
if this site were selected. Concerning the possible utilization of 
the Statler Hotel, Mr. Kelso observed that the City of Boston is vejry 
short of hotel space; also, prime office space. 

In response to a query concerning the problem of low fly- 
ing aircraft at Columbia Point, Mr. Hilgenhurst stated that future 
aircraft design will probably take care of this problem. It was 
noted that present plans call for establishing a community of 50 
to 70,000 persons on the Columbia Point acreage; also, that less 
than 100 acres is now available on that site. 

It was brought out that, if the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee expresses interest in the North Station site, the BRA 
would be able to provide a preliminary opinion on its feasibility 
within a month. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 
unanimously 



3143 



North Station 

Site 

UM/ Boston 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees thatythey 
VOTED: request the BRA in cooperation with 

Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates to study 

the feasibility of the North Station area 

as a permanent site for the UM at Boston 

campus . 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:20 p.m. 





J. McCart 

Board of Trustees 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
August 5, 1968, 1:30 p.m., Chancellor's Office, U of M, Boston 

PRESENT : Vice Chairman Healey, President 

Lederle; Trustees Emerson, Haigis, 
Pumphret and Troy 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Trustees Gordon, Knowles, McNamara 
and Plimpton 

The meeting was called to order by Vice Chairman Healey. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose 

of interviewing candidates for the Chancellor- 
ship of UM at Boston as recommended by the 
Faculty Consultative Committee on Selection 
of the Chancellor. 

Four candidates were interviewed. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To come out of executive session for the 
purpose of adjournment. 

The Executive Committee will present its findings to an 
executive session of the Board of Trustees at an early date. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:30 p.m. 





Roberjfewf. McCartney 
Secretary, (Board of Trustees 




314{ 



K 



Chancellor 
UM/Boston 



3146 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston 



Renovations 
Phase IV 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
August 1, 1968, 11:00 a.m., Parlor D, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Emerson, Gordon, 
Maginnis; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Dean McGuirk, Dr. Gage, 
Acting Dean Gagnon, Planning Officer 
Littlefield, UM at Amherst; Planning 
Officer O'Brien, UM at Boston; Mr. Kay 
Alexander of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay 
Associates; Messrs. Jan Wampler and 
Leo Schwartz of the Boston Renewal 
Agency; Messrs. Goody and Russell of 
Goody and Clancy, Inc. 



Chairman Haigis introduced Planning Officer O'Brien who 
reviewed the work to be done at the Arlington Street building at 
UM/Boston under various phases and contracts on fiscal 1968 funds. 
Treasurer Johnson observed that the work was expected to be com- 
pleted two days prior to the return of students for the fall, 1968 
term. Bidders and prices follow: 



R. A. Caputo Company 
James Construction Company 
James S. Kelliher, Inc. 
J. A. Singarella Company 
S. Volpe & Company, Inc. 



$498,669.00 
$511,360.00 
$632,338.00 
$499,990.00 
$577,000.00 



Mr. O'Brien explained that, from now on, contracts under 
Phase IV would be drawing upon the $1,510,000.00 appropriation for 
fiscal 1969. Projects include repairing of roof leaks, painting, 
increased capacity in power lines, major building renovations, etc. 
This will account for approximately $600,000. One hundred and forty 
thousand is being allowed for equipment. It was reported that one 
additional science laboratory might be required at the 100 
Arlington Street location. Major renovations at this location are 
coming to an end. An exception is the placing of a mezzanine in the 
lobby which will be utilized for a science library. 



After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

they approve the plans for renovations under 
contracts associated with Phase IV for 
renovations at the 100 Arlington Street build- 
ing of UM at Boston, and to authorize the 
Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, to award the 
contract for this work to the lowest qualified 
and eligible bidder. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they confirm the award of the contract on 
Phase III to the low bidder, R. A. Caputo 
Company of Belmont, Massachusetts in the 
amount of $498,669.00. 

Planning Officer O'Brien further reported that the acqui- 
sition of additional rental space adjacent to the present Park 
Square location of UM/Boston is running into difficulty. Adequate 
space is simply not available at this time. Future rentals may ex- 
ceed the $4.00 to $4.50 per square foot figure as at present. He 
predicted that the University will need to obtain small parcels of 
space at a greater distance and at higher cost. 

It was further reported that it will not be possible to 
make renovations for administrative space in the Armory, even if 
dollars become available, due to a recent informal ruling of the 
Attorney General's office. 



The committee next considered Agenda Item 8: 
Amherst Fire Station. 



Site for 



Treasurer Johnson reported on a meeting involving Chair- 
man Haigis, President Lederle, Town officials and himself. It is 
evident that the Town of Amherst wishes to divide the community in- 
to fire districts. A possibility has come up that a new fire 
station might be located on East Pleasant Street opposite Eastman 
Lane at one corner of the Tillson Farm. This would require alloca- 
tion of up to four acres of space presently owned by the University 
The Town is asking us to expand the present cadre of 20 student 
volunteers to 40 together with the construction of dormitory facili 
ties for them at the fire station location. 

Estimated cost of the three-bay fire station is approxi- 
mately $250,000. The possibility exists that this might become the 
town's main fire station and also combine with our security office 
at this location. 

The Treasurer cautioned that the University's fire con- 
sultant, Mr. Rex Wilson, has not yet advised us whether or not, in 
his opinion, the Town and the University should have their own 
separate fire districts. 

Discussion followed on road circulation patterns through- 
out the campus and accessibility to fire apparatus; also, the de- 
sirability of closing off North Pleasant Street so that the new 
Life Science Building could be built on the west face of the presen 
Morrill Science Center. 

After further discussion and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was unanimously 



3I4~ 



*y 



Phase III 



Amherst 

Fire 

Station 



3148 



COMMITTEE 



Review of 
Boston Site 
Progress 



North 

Station 

area 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they express favorable interest in moving 
forward together with the Town of Amherst 
to investigate the possibility of locating 
a fire station and dormitory facility at 
the corner of the Tillson Farm on East 
Pleasant Street opposite Eastman Lane, to- 
gether with a review of traffic circulation 
patterns throughout the campus with particular 
emphasis on closing North Pleasant Street 
(Route 116) to vehicular traffic between 
Ellis Drive and the West Experiment Station. 

A confidential slide presentation of tentative plans for 
development of a World's Fair at the Columbia Point location was 
presented by Messrs. Jan Wampler and Leo Schwartz of the BRA. 

It was reported by Planning Officer O'Brien that, as a 
result of a massive housing program being signed by President 
Johnson today in Washington, as much as 50 million dollars may be- 
come available through HUD for qualified developers to proceed with 
housing in a number of areas including Columbia Point. Thus, it 
seems fairly certain, that a housing project would be adjacent to 
the campus if the Trustees should select Columbia Point as a perma- 
nent site for UM/Boston. It was stressed that the intent of the 
Federal legislation is to develop the infra-structure of a com- 
pletely new town. 

Comments were made both pro and con as to whether the 
adjacent housing facilities would prove to be an advantage or dis- 
advantage to a new campus. Concern was expressed also regarding the 
availability of rapid transit. 

Mr. Kay Alexander of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates pre- 
sented an interim report on the North Station area. Representatives 
of his firm and Dean Belluschi have met with BRA officials. They 
conclude that this area has an exciting design potential. Only 15 
or 20 acres, instead of 30 acres as BRA had earlier stated, would no^7 
be available for the University under present BRA plans. Existing 
land uses in the area would be retained by BRA plan contrary to the 
report at the last meeting. 

Key issues include the following: 

a. Disposition of the Boston Garden and develop- 
ment of a new indoor stadium facility on the 
site. 

b. A new hotel. 

c. Ownership by the Massachusetts General Hospital 
of seven acres in the center of the site on 
which foundation work has started for a new 
building. 



II 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

d. Problems created by the existing and proposed 
highway system including a bridge to span this 
acreage from Leverett Circle to a point near 
the Mystic River Bridge. Dean Belluschi was 
particularly negative on this aspect. 

e. Availability of excellent rapid transit 
facilities. 

During the slide presentation by Mr. Alexander which 
followed, these key points were made: 

a. The North Station site is approximately a 
ten-minute walk from the State House and 
environs. 

b. There is excellent access to the site by 
highway and rapid transit. 

c. The area has an assessed valuation of 3.5 
million dollars and a market value of an 
estimated 25 million. 

d. Insofar as present and proposed uses are 
concerned, the BRA, MDC and MBTA plans are 
fairly well finalized. The Massachusetts 
General Hospital, for example, has gone into 
the final design stage on their facility and 
piles are already being driven. 

It is expected that the BRA will present their feasibility 
report to the Trustees on August 12. 

Further discussion elicited the fact that the railroad 
tracks will probably remain in place behind the existing North 
Station for at least ten years (four to six tracks may be retained 
for the indefinite future) . ■ 

Trustee Gordon proposed that the chief BRA administrator 
now be brought into discussions with the President and Trustees, 
and that further study and negotiations move ahead. 

It was agreed that some study and review should be given 
to acreage in Cambridge directly across the river from the North 
Station site. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To request the present ad hoc UM/Boston site 

committee, including Trustees Gordon, Crowley, 
Healey and Chairman Haigis if possible, to con- 
fer with Messrs. Champion (BRA) and Kelso 
(Chamber of Commerce) so that the Board of 



3149 



3150 



COMMITTEE 



Feasibility 

Studies - 
Health 

Services 



Convocation 
and Athletic 
Center - 
Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustees may be advised at the earliest possible 
date concerning the real prospects for acquisi- 
tion of the North Station and/or other site 
possibilities for UM at Boston. 

Dr. Robert Gage, Director of the University Health Ser- 
vices, assisted by Messrs. Goody and Russell of the firm of Goody 
and Clancy, Inc. reported on a feasibility study (Massachusetts 
State Project U68-3) of additions to the Health Services Building 
at the campus in Amherst. This year's capital outlay appropriation 
provided $100,000 for plans for this project. 

Dr. Gage pointed out that the requirement is to provide 
for 28,000 to 30,000 students in the years ahead. The present 
facility was constructed to provide for 10,000 students on an anti- 
cipated basis of two to two and one-half visits per student per 
year (24,000 per year). The actual number of visits is already at 
64,000 per year. A more realistic figure of anticipated out-patient 
visits would be five to six visits per year per student (180,000 
per year) . It is not possible to vacate the present quarters so 
planning is moving forward toward an addition to the Health Services 
Building. 

Mr. Russell observed that the site requirement presents 
difficulties, and that a prime consideration is the need for ground 
level out-patient access. This lead to a proposal for expansion to 
the west. The building proposed would have a capability of adding 
one floor later on. The project would be divided into several 
stages . 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they proceed with stages one and two of 
Massachusetts State Project U68-3, Additions 
to the Health Services Building, University 
of Massachusetts, Amherst. 

Dean McGuirk presented a proposal for a Convocation and 
Athletic Center at UM/ Amherst which might be financed under the 
University Building Authority at sometime in the future. 

The original concept calls for a 12,000 seat basketball 
arena, a 6,000 seat recreation ice and hockey arena and a general 
purpose field house and supplementary facilities. It was stressed 
that this project needs exploration with students participating and 
that at an early stage should be discussed with the Building 
Authority. 

The initial proposal presented by Dean McGuirk as out- 
lined in Document T69-003 was received with interest and favorable 
comment by the committee. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
VOTED : express to Dean McGuirk the interest 

of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
of the Board of Trustees that the possi- 
bilities in the proposal for a Convocation 
and Athletic Center be further explored. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the Town of Amherst 
wishes to dead-end Farview Way at the campus edge. The town would 
sever the road and a "turn-around" and a driveway across University 
property to provide access to the Howard Laboratories would be con- 
structed. 



After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that they approve the design of a nortli 
entrance road to the campus in Amherst 
in accordance with a plan on file in the 
Treasurer's Office. 

The Treasurer reported that it is now desirable to move 
forward to acquire the last piece of land called for under the 
original master plan. This is the Ostrowski property consisting 
of approximately 22 acres. Last year, on the basis of appraisals, 
the Board of Trustees voted taking it at $40,000, but this 
authorization was not implemented due to an insufficiency of funds, 

In the intervening months , the value of the property has 
risen. The average of two appraisals (Brody: $36,750; Teahan: 
$47,250) comes out to $42,125. In view of the availability of an 
extra $100,000 in the budget for land takings, the Treasurer re- 
quested authority for another taking order to be drawn at the 
average figure cited above. 

It was next moved, seconded and 

VOTED : In accordance with Chapter 476, Acts of 1968, 
Item 8069-66, and other Acts authorizing the 
Trustees of the University to acquire land, or 
land with buildings thereon, by purchase or by 
eminent domain under Chapter 79 of the General 
Laws, for the further development of the Uni- 
versity; independent appraisals of the value 
of the land and buildings, if any, having been 
made by qualified disinterested appraisers and 
filed with Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer; 
that the Trustees of the University purchase 
or take by eminent domain in fee, the property 
of Peter A. and Mary M. Ostrowski (supposed 
owners), consisting of 22.2 acres, more or 



3151 



North 
Entrance 
Road - 
UM/ Amherst 



Land 
Acquisition 

UM/ Amherst 



Ostrowski 
Property 



3152 



COMMITTEE 



Power 
Plant 

Expansion - 
UM/ Amherst 



Fiscal 1969 
Capital Outlay- 
Appropriations 
Bill Report 

Other 
Business 



Traffic 
Regulations 

Modification 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

less, located in Hadley and Amherst, Massa- 
chusetts, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of 
Land in Hadley and Amherst, Massachusetts 
to be acquired by the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts for the use of the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts," dated June 20, 
1967, and prepared by Gordon E. Ainsworth and 
Associates; said parcel being that described 
in Book 1052, Page 279 of the Hampshire 
County Registry of Deeds; and that the award 
for said property be Forty two thousand one 
hundred twenty-five dollars. ($42,125.00) 

The Treasurer reported that it will be necessary now to 
expand the Power Plant. A report by Jackson & Moreland, consulting 
engineers, recommended converting the entire plant from coal to oil 
with a gas back-up. Originally, we did not go along with the 
recommendation and advised that the plant addition should be de- 
signed with coal as the energy source. Now, problems have arisen 
which will require that part of the coal will have to be moved and 
enlarged to serve the enlarged power plant. This has generated a 
whole new engineering study by the consultants authorized by BBC. 
This report should be available shortly. 

The Treasurer next distributed copy of the Capital Outlay 
Appropriations for Fiscal 1969, noting that planning funds for the 
Arts and Sciences Classroom- Laboratory-Auditorium Building had been 
included. See Document T69-005. 

The Treasurer reported that certain modifications in the 
University Motor Vehicle Regulations are now required due to the 
fact that Alumni Stadium lies in the Town of Hadley; also, the Uni- 
versity has property in South Deerfield and Belchertown. Appro- 
priate University officials should be authorized to request the 
assistance of local police in those jurisdictions, when deemed 
necessary. 

Additionally, vehicles - apparently in running condition - 
have been found in University parking areas without license plates 
attached. The police should be authorized to have such vehicles re- 
moved without delay. 

From time to time, in the high-rise area, vehicles have 
been parked so as to obstruct the access of fire apparatus to some 
buildings. To keep such fire lanes clear, tow authorization is 
needed. 

In accordance with Chapter 75, Section 32A, of the General 
Laws of the Commonwealth, authorizing the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts to make rules and regulations for the control, 
movement and parking of vehicles on the campus of the University and 
on other land of the University, and to provide reasonable penalties 
for the violation of said rules and regulations, on motion duly made 

and seconded, it was unanimously 



II 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



3153 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the traffic rules and regulations approved 
by the Trustees be further amended as 
follows: (Dashes through words and figures 
indicate deletions; underlined words and 
figures indicate additions.) 

ARTICLE II. AUTHORITY AND DUTIES OF POLICE 
Section 2 

Amend as follows: 

Section 2, Assistance - The President, 
Treasurer, Provost, Dean of Students, 
and/or the Chief of the University 
Police may request the assistance of 
the police of other 

towns wherein University lands are 
situate , and/or the State Police^ 
whenever in their judgment such 
assistance is necessary. 

ARTICLE IV. ILLEGAL PARKING, Section 4 

Add the following sentences: 

Any vehicle found without a valid 
license plate attached will be con - 
sidered an abandoned vehicle and re - 
moved from University property. The 
owner will be responsible for costs 
involved in removing and the storage 
of such vehicles. The University 
assumes no responsibility for the care 
or protection of, or damage to, any 
such motor vehicle or its contents . 

ARTICLE V. TOW-AWAY ZONE REGULATIONS, Section 6 

Add the following new sub-section (d) : 

(d) In any fire zone or fire lane . 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:40 p.m. 





Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trusses 




3154 



COMMITTEE 



Appointment 
of Head of De- 
partment of 
Geriatrics & 
Associate Dean 
for Academic 
Affairs, 
Medical 
School 



Clinical 
Associates 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL 

POLICY 

August 12, 1968, 11:00 a.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Maginnis and Plimpton; 
Secretary McCartney. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Provost Tippo, Dean Soutter. 



Chairman Troy introduced Dean Soutter of the Medical 
School who spoke on the appointment of Dr. Richard Saunders as 
Associate Professor with tenure and Head of the Department of 
Geriatrics and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the Medical 
School. The Dean noted that Dr. Saunders has had previous ex- 
perience as Associate Dean and Assistant Professor of Medicine at 
Cornell University between 1960 and 1965 . He comes highly 
recommended. He is presently Associate Director of the National 
Board of Medical Examiners. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they appoint Richard H. Saunders, M.D. to 
the position of Associate Professor, U.M. 
of Medicine with tenure; Head of the Depart- 
ment, U.M. of Geriatrics and Associate Dean 
for Academic Affairs, Medical School, U.M. 

The Provost explained the requirement of certain depart- 
ments (e.g. Psychology) to have an appropriate title or rank to 
describe certain ancillary personnel who provide services without 
compensation. He noted that, in the past, we have had to give this 
class of person the "Adjunct Professor" title. 



After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded. 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the establishment of the rank 
of Clinical Associate, without compensation. 

In view of the resignation of Dean Edward C. Moore of the 
Graduate School and the pro tem assumption of his duties by the 
present Associate Dean while a national search for a replacement 
continues, the Provost recommended that Dr. Arthur Gentile be given 
the title of Acting Dean of the Graduate School, effective 
September 1, 1968. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve a change in title for Dr. 
Arthur Gentile from Professor, U.M. with 
tenure and Associate Dean, Graduate School 
to Professor, U.M. of Botany with tenure 
and Acting Dean, Graduate School with no 
increase in salary, effective September 1, 
1968. 

Chairman Troy requested President Lederle to leave the 
meeting. The Chairman reported to the committee that the Depart- 
ment of Government has been concerned that the President did not 
have tenure in an appropriate academic department. This practice 
is the usual custom in public universities. 



After brief discussion and upon motion made and seconded, 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

they appoint John W. Lederle to the position 
of Professor, U.M., Government, with tenure, 
in addition to his appointment as President 
of the University, effective September 1, 1968, 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:25 a.m. 





Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary/ Board of Trust* 




3L5; 



K 



Gentile, Dr. 
Arthur - 
Appointment of 
Acting Dean, 
Graduate 
School 



President 
Lederle - 
Tenure in 
Department of 
Government 



3156 



COMMITTEE 



Chancellor 
UM/ Bos ton 



Broderick, 
Francis Lyons, 
Chancellor 

UM/ Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
August 12, 1968, 11:45 a.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Vice Chairman Healey, President 
Lederle; Trustees Emerson, Healey, 
Pumphret and Troy, Secretary 
McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, 



Vice Chairman Healey stated that the purpose of the meet- 
ing was to consider the qualifications of leading candidates for 
the position of Chancellor of the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston, as recommended by the ad hoc Faculty and Student Committees 
on the Selection of the Chancellor, UM at Boston. 

It was thereupon moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the 
purpose of discussing the qualifica- 
tions of the candidates. 

After appropriate discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To come out of executive session for 
the purpose of continuing with the 
agenda. 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the appointment of Francis Lyons 
Broderick as Chancellor of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Boston at an 
annual salary of $29,700, effective 
October 1, 1968. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 






Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

August 28, 1968, 11:00 a.m., UM/Boston and Statler Hotel 

Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Boyden, President Lederle; 
Trustees Emerson, Haigis, Lyons, 
Pumphret, Troy; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Ryan, Dean 
Redfern, Dean Soutter, Acting Dean 
Gagnon, Business Manager Grady, Miss 
Coulter; Professor Zunic, Attorney 
John Mackin, Dean McGuirk, Dr. George 
Richason, Chairman, Athletic Council 
and Mr. R. O'Connell, Assistant 
Athletic Director. 



The meeting was convened at 11:00 a.m. Trustee Troy 
assumed the chair, pro tempore. 

The first order of business was a petition from Professor 
Matthew Zunic, a member of the University Faculty at Amherst. 

Professor Zunic, accompanied by his legal representative. 
Attorney John Mackin, delineated the particular matter of dis- 
satisfaction with his current professorial status, expecially with 
respect to annual income and merit increases. He introduced his 
counsel, expressed appreciation for again being accorded opportu- 
nity to present his case, and stated that the final judgment would 
be up to the Board of Trustees. He then distributed copies of his 
exposition and proceeded to describe the content. Professor Zunic 
requested that the Attorney General be asked to clarify certain 
rulings (see attached) and stated his personal efforts to secure a 
ruling had resulted in the reply that this request should be 
initiated by the Administration or Trustees. 

President Lederle inquired whether the petitioner and 
his counsel were familiar with the "best evidence rule." Counselor 
Mackin stated that he was. 

Trustee Pumphret inquired whether Professor Zunic had 
observed the normal procedures provided by the Faculty Senate in 
grievance cases before appearing before the Board of Trustees. 
He stated the Board should not be in the role of by-passing the 
academic procedures in Amherst. Mr. Zunic advised he had been 
heard by the Faculty Tenure and Grievance Committee, though not by 
the full Faculty Senate. He expressed dissatisfaction with the re- 
sult of his hearing and stated that no formal written summary of 
the Committee's conclusions had been sent to him by the Committee. 



315? 



Professor 
Zunic 



3158 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Pumphret advised Mr. Zunic to exhaust his rights 
through channels provided at Amherst before requesting a hearing be- 
fore the Board of Trustees. He stated that Mr. Zunic had certain 
rights, and no one on the Board intended to take them away; but the 
procedure should be orderly, through prescribed channels. 

Attorney Mackin was then recognized. He noted he had only 
recently become associated with the case, but cited Acts of 1962, 
chapter 648, sections 32A and 34 (which provide that nothing con- 
tained therein shall be construed to deny to any employee employed 
prior to the effective date of the Act any of his vested contractual 
rights as a state employee) . Attorney Mackin stated his client was 
addressing himself to the salary classification. Trustee Pumphret 
acknowledged that if the petitioner were addressing himself to this 
area, he would be within the proper procedure in presenting the 
matter to the Board. 

Acting Chairman Troy emphasized the necessity of con- 
centrating on the current situation. He noted that the central, 
immediate problem relates to the current status of the petitioner. 

Professor Zunic stated his main complaint is financial. 

There was discussion, during which it was noted that 
Mr. Zunic had been evaluated impartially along with others on the 
staff by the Personnel Committee of his own department members in 
Physical Education. Trustee Pumphret observed that during the 
course of his employment it appeared he has, in fact, received 
increments which amount to 66%. 

Mr. Zunic stated he now seeks to have the University get 
a ruling from the Attorney General's office under certain statutes 
which he regards as applicable to his case. 

Mr. Zunic stated that, had he remained at his former in- 
crement level (Grade 20) where he was at the maximum in his salary 
grade, rather than move to his present position, he would be at a 
relatively superior level to that he now occupies. (See item 4 on 
attached memorandum) . He then took issue with the type of evalua- 
tion form used in his department review for increment consideration 
purposes. 

Attorney Mackin again alluded to the fact that his intro- 
duction to the case was only recent, but stated he had been advised 
that Professor Zunic has one of the largest classes in the depart- 
ment, yet receives the least pay of anyone. Professor Zunic added 
that no one has ever told him he has done a poor job. 

During the ensuing discussion, the President stated there 
is a merit evaluation of each man in terms of his contribution to 
his department. Trustee Lyons added that Mr. Zunic appears to in- 
sist on his own evaluation of his contribution to the department. 
He pointed out that, while Professor Zunic states he had no warning, 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that no one told him he was doing a poor job, the fact that his 
salary was not raised on some occasions is a precise indication by 
the department as to how he was evaluated. 

Counsel Mackin introduced a letter alleged to have been 
written to Professor Zunic by his department head, Professor 
Vanderzwagg, in which his performance was praised. The Attorney 
felt Dr. Vanderzwagg should be heard and re-evaluation made on the 
basis of this fresh viewpoint. 

Chairman Troy cautioned there are many levels of work in 
a department. A man, for example, may be immensely valuable as a 
teacher of freshman composition on one level, but not deemed 
capable of assuming advanced courses in Shakespeare or Chaucer 
which might well qualify for a higher salary. 

Professor Zunic expressed the opinion that over- 
emphasis was placed on publishing. He stated also he would not do 
research as he does not believe he could make a new contribution 
in his particular field. Trustee Lyons asked Mr. Zunic if, in 
fact, it is not an accepted premise in the academic world that re- 
search is valuable. Mr. Zunic clarified his position, stating he 
had meant he would not do "scholarly research, just physical re- 
search," since he is not a lab man. 

Trustee Lyons stated it is expected that teachers will 
spend their time off (for example during the summer) to renew and 
refresh themselves in their field. He expressed the opinion that 
Professor Zunic 's statement had described some of his own limita- 
tions . 

After another request by the Chairman to confine and focus 
the discussion in deference to time available for this hearing, 
Professor Zunic stated there were actually five questions which he 
wished to have answered (see attached list). The committee re- 
viewed the points listed and again reminded Mr. Zunic that only 
matters of current concern would be considered. Thus, item 1, 
having been previously ruled upon, would not be included in the 
current consideration; Professor Zunic is no longer basketball 
coach and will not be. 

Item 2. referred to $300 claimed due for his 
first month's work 

Item 3. referred to the fact that he was work- 
ing on a 12-month basis. He claims he 
was appointed for the academic year 

Item 4. referred to the point that if he had re- 
mained at his former level of Grade 20, 
on the state's single salary scale, com- 
pared to the present rating, he would be 
receiving $13,625 per year. (Mr. Zunic 's 
salary is now $13,200). 



3159 



31.60 



COMMITTEE 



Nepotism 
UM/ Bos ton 



Associate 
Provost 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Item 5. referred to step raise maximums. He 
feels that, since he was at maximum 
of old scale, he would expect when 
scale changed to be at least at the 
average salary for a full professor. 

President Lederle pointed out that Mr. Zunic had no vested 
right to any particular salary level when the system changed over, 
except that of not having his salary reduced. 

Trustee Crowley drew attention to the fact that this is 
the third Trustee hearing Professor Zunic has been accorded. He 
noted also that, in spite of this, Mr. Zunic is quoted in the press 
as claiming not to have had a hearing. Mr. Zunic attributed this 
to the fact that he had never received formal correspondence in re- 
ply. This completed the presentation of his case. He expressed the 
hope for a reply to items 2, 3, 4 and 5 of the listing. 

Attorney Mackin then stated he had never before seen this 
interpretation of tenure and that it may have to be decided in 
Court. Messrs. Zunic and Mackin then left the meeting. 

After discussion, it was the consensus that Attorney 
Austin Broadhurst be requested to carry a letter to the Attorney 
General requesting interpretation of item 4 re grading. Treasurer 
Johnson advised that rulings on the preceding matters from the 
Attorney General are already at hand. However, he stressed the ad- 
visability of having Attorney Broadhurst investigate further. 

The meeting was recessed at 12:50 p.m. to the Hancock 
Room of the Statler Hilton for luncheon. 

The meeting was reconvened at 1:20 p.m. 

President Lederle briefly reviewed the University policy 
on nepotism. He described two cases currently under consideration 
at UM/Boston and requested Chancellor Ryan to explain the circum- 
stances to the committee. 

The Chancellor stated the persons involved are aware of 
the established Board policy on nepotism. In view of this, it is 
his opinion they should be advised this fall that part-time appoint- 
ment of the wives involved will be terminated next year. Attorney 
Broadhurst has stated it is clear that the University can adopt such 
a policy and can also enforce it. 

Provost Tippo then submitted the curriculum vitae of a 
candidate for Associate Provost and Professor of English with tenure 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy has been 
advised and the Personnel Committee of the Department of English 
has voted unanimously to offer him the title of Professor of 
English with tenure. After discussion, motion was made, seconded, 
and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
the appointment of Jeremiah M. Allen 
to the position of Associate Provost 
and Professor of English with tenure, 
effective October 1, 1968, or as soon 
thereafter as he is able to assume the 
position. 

President Lederle then submitted for discussion certain 
basic recommendations about the first Commencement of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Boston in 1969. A memorandum on this 
matter was circulated to the committee in advance of the meeting 
(Document T69-007) . The President then asked Chancellor Ryan to 
discuss details of the plan. 

An estimated budget of $12 - $15,000 was proposed. It 
was noted that no honorary degrees would be offered by the Boston 
campus in 1969. 

The matter was left that a conference would be held with 
Chancellor Broderick when he assumes his duties and recommendations 
made to insure that certain state officials who were helpful in 
establishing the campus would be included in the program. 

Treasurer Johnson distributed a list recommending budget 
transfers between subsidiary accounts (Document T69-008) . Due to 
the highly restrictive budgets for fiscal 1969, it has been found 
necessary to transfer funds to maintain minimal level operations 
in certain academic areas. The present acute situation would have 
necessitated, among other restrictions, closing the library during 
certain hours, etc. Replacement sums will be requested in the 
deficiency budget request. 

Considerable discussion was then held on the serious 
situation brought about by three successive restrictive budgets. 
The Provost reported that communications from Deans and Department 
Heads stressed the critical nature of their needs. It was noted 
that an additional 1500 students must be educated on the Amherst 
campus this year. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of transfers as shown on Docu- 
ment T69-008 attached. 



3161 



Allen, 
Jeremiah M. 



UM/ Boston 
C ommen c erne n t 
1969 



Budget 
Transfers 



3162 



COMMITTEE 

.Master Plan 
Preliminary 
Draft 



General 
Budget 
Policy 
Issues 1970 



Disadvantaged 
Students 
UM/ Bos ton 



Junior Year 
in France 
UM/ Bos ton 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle then introduced discussion of the 
"Preliminary Draft: Master Plan." 

Provost Tippo drew attention to the letter accompanying 
the draft which stated the plan is still flexible and subject to 
change. The great need for continued support of all constituent 
publics, particularly the Executive Department and Legislature was 
stressed. The Provost said that, in addition to the Master Plan, 
it is necessary for the Commonwealth to establish an overall plan 
for higher education in the 1970' s, which will take into account 
the goals and objectives of all segments of the system, and also 
identify the resources of the Commonwealth to accomplish what needs 
to be done. 

Provost Tippo stated it is expected within the next few 
weeks, after further conferences with faculty and student groups, 
that the "Preliminary Draft: Master Plan," will be complete and 
ready to submit to the Board of Trustees. 

President Lederle then presented the General Budget Policy 
Issues for 1970 (Document T69-009) . Attention was drawn to the 
enrollment increase (indicated on the 1970 Budget Guideline) of 
1500 students at Amherst, for a total of 17,335, and 100 at Boston 
for a total of 3,500. 

The "Funds for Adjustments to Base Budget" were discussed. 
It was stated this request is necessary because of inadequate 
operating appropriations in recent year. Increases in non-pro- 
fessional positions and subsidiary accounts (other than 01 and 02) 
have not kept pace with enrollment and faculty increases, inflation 
and technological advances. Continued inadequate support of the 
academic personnel will cause some programs to deteriorate rapidly 
and seriously. 

The President next previewed the Boston budget. 

At the President's request, Chancellor Ryan discussed the 
provision for Disadvantaged Students. The Boston campus has had a 
continuing program of this nature, though not separately budgeted. 
He noted that the record of these students is as good as that of 
other students. The students themselves are about 757o negro and of 
a range of age, not necessarily all young, unmarried students. The 
Chancellor felt this distribution to be satisfactory. He expected 
to continue on a similar basis. 

President Lederle discussed the "Junior Year in France" 
program. He said that similar foreign programs have been under- 
taken at Amherst but always within the University's regular appro- 
priation assisted by private funds. Since the Boston budget of 
$4 million is adequate to absorb some of these costs, this program 
will be carried out of Boston's general operating funds rather than 
as a special appropriation item. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The President advised that he felt "Repertory Theatre 
program" should be deleted, pending further study. This is not an 
academic theatre and it is felt that the University at Boston has 
enough problems without taking on one more. Chairman Troy noted 
that the Chancellor had been encouraged to determine the legislative 
feeling on such a program, and it is now before the Faculty and 
Educational Policy Committee for a decision. The Chancellor ob- 
served that he had brought up this matter with the Majority Leader 
of the House and members of the Senate including the Chairman of 
the Ways and Means Committee, all of whom wished to be relieved of 
the necessity of discussing it. However, they indicated they 
would support it. They would not, however, wish to support a 
budget request specifically for the Repertory Theatre. The 
Chancellor noted that this would not be an academic program; the 
members of the Repertory Company would, in fact, be employees of 
the University. The Chancellor felt the academic rewards would be 
great, even though the project is not an academic program. He 
called it a best example of an urban extension program. 

President Lederle stated that Boston already has fine 
cultural resources. He questioned whether with all its other problem 
this is the time and the place the University wishes to make its 
contribution. 

After full discussion, the matter was left that further 
examination and exploration of the sponsorship of a Repertory 
Theatre at Boston would be made. The endorsement and recommenda- 
tions of the Arts Council and drama authorities such as Eliot 
Norton would be sought. 

The President then advanced to discussion of "Funds for 
New Programs at Amherst." He requested Secretary McCartney to 
describe the Educational Television request. 

The Secretary stated that both operating and capital 
funds must be received before July 1, 1969 to take advantage of 
available federal matching funds. The Secretary noted that early 
prospects for activating Channel 57 stay alive because the Con- 
gress has appropriated $4,375,000 of federal money, expected to be 
distributed about November, providing the appropriation bill is 
signed by President Johnson. He added, however, that a firm re- 
quest must be placed for state funds now so that the base appro- 
priation will be on hand when federal monies are distributed. The 
capital request will be presented in the capital budget. 

"The Center for Study of Innovations in Education" was 
described by the Provost as a mechanism to prepare proposals for 
grants. The amount reflected in the budget is expected to provide 
a small office, with a director, secretary and essential equipment 
to generate additional grant money. 



3163 



Repertory 

Theatre 

UM/Boston 



Educational 
Television 



The Center 
for Study of 
Innovations in 
Education 



3164 



Law School 



COMMITTEE 



Transfer 
Student Union 
to Building 
Authority 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The funds for the Law School were discussed. It was 
noted that the plans had policy clearance from the Board of Higher 
Education. The amount represented in the budget will provide funds 
to establish the program. 

The balance of the budget reflects the normal growth 
commensurate with enrollment increase. Business Manager Grady dis- 
played chart forms which graphically recapitulated the total Uni- 
versity Operating Budget Request for 1970. 

The great urgency of communicating to the Governor's 
office and to the Legislature the pressing need for more adequate 
operating funds was discussed. The effects of the recurring cuts 
in the budget were thoroughly explored. Soon the inevitable results 
will be (1) elimination of all new programs and/or (2) the need to 
cut enrollment. The matter was left that a serious, concentrated 
effort would be made to acquaint the Governor with the depth of the 
problem. 

Treasurer Johnson advised that Attorney Broadhurst is in 
the process of preparing papers to be discussed with the Attorney 
General's office with reference to the transfer of the Student Union 
to the Building Authority. It is expected they will be submitted 
for Trustee consideration soon. 

Discussion of honorary degree candidates was postponed 
until a future meeting due to the lateness of the hour. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:25 p.m. 




Rober 
Secretary, 





McCartney 
iSoard of Trust? 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 

September 9, 1968, 11:00 a.m., Office of Campbell, Aldrich & Nulty, 

Boston 



3165 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Croce, Crowley, Gordon, 
Maginnis, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



Dean Soutter, Dean Gagnon, Planning Officer 
O'Brien, Miss Coulter, Messrs. Aldrich, 
Moyes, Quinlan and other staff members of 
Campbell, Aldrich & Nulty; Messrs. Alexander 
and Chapman from the Office of Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay Associates; Messrs. Clark, Stockwell, 
King, Grieg and Miss Sawyer from the UM/Medical 
School; Messrs. Gediman and Portrest of the BBC, 
present at the morning meeting only. 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 11:00 a.m. in the 
Office of Campbell, Aldrich & Nulty, Boylston Street, Boston. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Dean Soutter of the 
Medical School advised the committee that a federal funding grant of 
more than $13.8 million for the education and library portion of the 
University Medical School in Worcester had been received. Dean 
Soutter requested Mr. Aldrich of Campbell, Aldrich & Nulty to pre- 
sent the architectural design for external appearance of the build- 
ing. 

With the use of a scale model, a range of photographs and 
sketches, Mr. Aldrich presented the new design, describing it as a 
very simple one. He drew attention to the radically different 
treatment of the exterior; also the relation of the walls and windows 

Mr. Aldrich recommended instead of limestone, that granite 
cladding be used for the exterior; the color and texture to be 
selected later. He stated that a warm toned granite, with bronze 
anodized aluminum window detail would be extremely effective. 
Although the cost is determined by the color and texture of the 
granite selected, Mr. Aldrich stated that very thin granite cladding 
will not increase the cost over what was anticipated with the first 
design. He explained that the new, simpler design eliminates, for 
example, the complications (and expense) of stone cutting. In 
response to Trustee Maginnis 1 question as to whether in fact the 
design in its simplicity lacked interest and character, Mr. Aldrich 
stated this was a contributing consideration in recommending the 
addition of granite cladding to provide in combination with the 
bronzed effect of the window casings the beauty of special color and 
texture to the building. 



Medical 
School 
Federal 
Grant 



Medical 

School 

Plan 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Aldrich then described the layout of interior areas 
noting that the library, originally off the main building, is now 
between the two wings. Three floors of reading and book stacks are 
provided and one floor for reference and periodical literature, as 
well as space for general administration of the library. 

Mr. Scott Quinlan described the new features in the 
design. He stated that the plan, while basically the same as that 
reviewed in March, now incorporates three minor changes. These in- 
clude (1) student entrance shifted to the west side, to give better 
circulation of the area - lockers, etc. (2) administration moved 
closer to link hospital (3) consolidation of circulation space in 
the library. These three areas were developed since the Washington 
submittal. 

It was pointed out with reference to fenestration that 
the movement had been away from a highly articulated design, with 
regrouping and pulling the building in tighter. Boldness is 
depicted in the precise, simple manner of the design. Mr. Quinlan 
stated that about a quarter of a million dollars was saved over the 
earlier estimate. He estimated that the use of granite cladding 
would cost approximately $180,000. 

After discussion, during which it was noted that these are 
not changes, but only a more detailed development of the plans pre- 
viously submitted, Dean Soutter stated they will be sent to 
Washington for the purpose of review and to keep everyone informed. 

In response to question, Dean Soutter expressed himself 
as satisified with the proportion of glass used in the building. 
He noted that it is tinted glass, which will help both with cooling 
and heating. 

Mr. Quinlan advised that the hospital will have the same 
outside effect; the same material. It is expected that the con- 
tract will go to bid late next summer and the completed building 
should be ready by the fall of 1972. 

Mr. Aldrich alluded briefly to consideration of a parking 
garage. The need to coordinate planning and the pressures of time 
in such a project were stressed. Treasurer Johnson advised, that 
although some preliminary studies have been made, the matter is not 
yet resolved. 

Dean Belluschi has not yet had an opportunity to view the 
presentation as made to the committee. It is expected he will do 
so within the week. Accordingly, after further comment and dis- 
cussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees subject to 
review and approval by the Trustees architectural 
advisor Dean Pietro Belluschi, acceptance of the 
exterior design of the Medical School building as 
presented. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting was then recessed at 11:45 a.m. and moved to 
the Statler Hotel, where it was reconvened at 12:50 p.m. 

The Treasurer reported on his recent trip to Columbus, 
Ohio, with reference to the Murrary D. Lincoln Trust. He described 
the legal instruments which require signature, in order to effectu- 
ate the course of action authorized by the Trustees at their meet- 
ing of May 31, 1968. Treasurer Johnson noted that oil rights and 
gas rights on the land affected are retained by the University. 
The sum of $11,200 will be paid by the State of Ohio for damages. 

After discussion and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson be and hereby 
is authorized to execute a contract of Sale 
and Purchase and all other instruments as 
may be necessary to effectuate the fulfill- 
ment of the terms and conditions therein, 
between the Board of Trustees, University 
of Massachusetts and the State of Ohio, per- 
taining to land and rights of the said Board 
of Trustees in said lands situated iri. Ohio, 
County of Franklin, and designated by the 
Ohio Department of Highways as Parcels Nos . 
113-WL and 113-U, Section 20.40 N; that the 
consideration to be paid by the State of 
Ohio be in the amount of $11,200 for the 
execution of said contract of Sale and Purchase 
and for the fulfillment of the terms and 
conditions therein, all as recited in a copy 
of said contract on file with the Office of 
the Treasurer. 

Chairman Haigis read to the meeting a letter received 
from the Nantucket Garden Club of Nantucket, Massachusetts, in- 
corporating a recommendation on naming of the University's property 
on Nantucket, During the course of the general discussion which 
ensued, Treasurer Johnson stated new directional road signs are on 
order for the University, at all locations, including Nantucket, 
Worcester, Waltham, Amherst, which will properly identify the areas 
as the UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS in addition to the regional and 
local indicia. The Treasurer will advise the interested parties at 
an appropriate time of action taken with respect to naming the 
property. 

Messrs. Alexander and Chapman of Sasaki, Dawson and DeMay 
Associates were then invited to make their presentation to the com- 
mittee on the North Station Area and Columbia Point as possible 
sites for the University at Boston. 



316? 



Murray D. 

Lincoln 

Land 



Nantucket 



UM/ Bos ton 
Site 



3168 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Alexander briefly reviewed the situation. He stated 
that, subsequent to the BRA proposal presented to the previous 
meeting, question was raised whether the area as delineated was 
available. As a result, informal meetings were held with various 
groups and a comparison of the Columbia Point and North Station 
sites was prepared. Messrs. Chapman and Alexander, using wall 
charts, described the areas under consideration. They related con- 
versations held with officials and interested parties. Included 
among the persons with whom they had spoken were MBTA officials, 
members of the M.I.T. staff, area businessmen, also officials of 
the Department of Public Works and the Massachusetts General 
Hospital. 

The problem of tans it was given special emphasis and in- 
vestigation. The results are shown in detail on the attached 
survey. Mr. Alexander pointed out that while both sites had auto 
access off-peak, during peak periods each was very congested. 

Site factors and alternatives weie graphically illustrated 
by the representations of Sasaki, Dawson and DeMay Associates. 
Some reservations were expressed about the actual, ultimate location 
of the proposed bridge and highway in the North Station area, since 
there is a division of opinion between the BRA and the MBTA 
authorities. Unfavorable location of the bridge would drastically 
affect the feasibility of this location by reducting the available 
acreage as currently proposed by the BRA. 

In summary, Mr. Alexander stated: 



THE NORTH STATION 



appears difficult, both in probable 
acreage and general availability. 



COLUMBIA POINT - the need for hard facts is evident. What 
are the present plans for development of 
this area? Is the site going to be used 
up for a housing project - or a world's 
fair? What solution can be offered for 
the transit problem? What highwaycon- 
nections will be provided? Precisely 
what shoreline area is proposed? What 
area is buildable? Is the city sewage 
disposal plant to remain? What utility 
services are available? Is city-owned 
land available? 

Planning Officer O'Brien urged that a further, concentrated 
effort be made to ascertain, in depth, future development plans re- 
lated to Columbia Point. This should include actual acreage avail- 
able to the University; utility connections; transit, both present 
and planned, and similar material vitally relevant to further con- 
sideration of this site. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The matter was left that, on the basis of reports 
tendered by UM/Boston Planning Officer O'Brien and Mr. Alexander 
of the office of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay and Associates, Columbia 
Point should be probed more deeply with particular reference to 
the points in need of firm answer as listed above. 

Dean Soutter circulated to members of the committee copies 
of a letter from David Tilson, Chief of the Health Research 
Facilities Branch, Division of Research Facilities and Resources of 
the Department of Health, Education and Welfare. (Document T69-012) 
In order to allow the University to proceed with construction, in 
advance of actual receipt of the funds requested, the letter stated 
that the University's architectural and engineering drawings must 
be processed through the department's Office of Architecture and 
Engineering. 

Motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Dean 
Soutter be authorized to proceed with the design 
and construction of the Medical School in 
accordance with the procedures outlined in a 
letter dated August 28, 1968 from the Chief, 
Health Research Facilities Branch, Division of 
Research Facilities and Resources. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:15 p.m. 



3169 



Medical 
School 





Robert^ J. McCartney 
SecretaryVyBoard of Trustee 




3170 



COMMITTEE 



Commencement 
Speakers 



Honorary 

Degree 

Candidates 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

September 12, 1968, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Boyden, President Lederle; 
Trustees Emerson, Haigis, Healey, 
Lyons, Troy; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Provost Tippo, Dean Redfern, Miss 
Coulter. 

The meeting of the Executive Committee was convened by 
Vice Chairman Healey at 11:00 a.m. in Room 434 of the Statler Hilton 
Hotel in Boston. 

Discussion was held on the University policy regarding 
staff members elected to public office. Copies of a memorandum in- 
corporating citation of the applicable statute, and excerpts from 
the minutes indicating previously established Trustee policy were at 
hand. Trustee Healey noted that the statute governs with respect 
to elective state office and the matter was left that President 
Lederle would assemble further data including policy and procedures 
of comparable institutions for subsequent review and consideration. 

President Lederle indicated the need for early considera- 
tion of a Commencement speaker for 1969 (Boston and Amherst) , due 
to the extremely demanding schedule the calibre of man the Univer- 
sity hopes to secure. Discussion was held, possibilities explored 
and a plan of action agreed upon. The President will communicate 
at once with the prospective speakers and will advise the committee 
at an early meeting of the results of his invitation. 

Chairman Healey then initiated discussion of the listing 
of proposed Honorary Degree candidates assembled in accord with 
usual formula, which had been furnished to the members of the 
committee in advance of the meeting. After deliberation, the matter 
was left that the committee would meet again in approximately two 
weeks to give further consideration to the revised list. 

President Lederle stated that approximately seven 
honorary degrees is a feasible number to consider awarding in terms 
of the Commencement program. There was discussion on deleting the 
actual award of diplomas during the ceremony, in order to limit its 
duration. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12 noon. 




R 
Secreta 



rt J. McCartne 
Board of Ti 




ees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
October 14, 1968, 1:30 p.m., Sheraton Plaza Hotel, Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Governor Volpe, Chairman Haigis, 
President Lederle; Trustees Crowley, 
Emerson, Gordon, Maginnis. Also, 
Trustees Boyden, Healey, Frechette, 
Kiernan, Knowles, Lamb son, McNamara, 
Lyons, Plimpton, Rowland, Troy; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



Speaker of the House of Representatives 
Robert H. Quinn, Senator George V. 
Kenneally, Mayor's representative 
Mr. Ziegler, Senate President's repre- 
sentative Driscoll; Chancellor Broderick, 
Acting Dean Gagnon, Messrs. Alexander, 
Chapman and Sasaki of Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay Associates; UM/B Planning Officer 
O'Brien, Miss Coulter. 



Board Chairman Boyden opened the meeting and extended 
greetings to the distinguished guests. He noted the importance and 
significance of the occasion, and asked Vice Chairman Healey to 
address the meeting. 

The Vice Chairman stated that the meeting had been called 
on the assumption that the Trustees were prepared to vote formally 
on a specific site for the University of Massachusetts at Boston 
with all indications in favor of Columbia Point. The Governor and 
legislative leaders had been invited to attend in order to apprise 
them of the full situation, including costs, land requirements, etc 
Trustee Healey said this is a monumental decision from the stand- 
point of the entire educational system of the state. He expressed 
appreciation to the Governor, Speaker Ouinn and representatives of 
the Legislative leadership of the state for their attendance at the 
meeting. 

Chairman Haigis of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
asked the representatives of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates to 
present the material prepared on the Columbia Point site, as well 
as a brief summary of the other sites considered. He noted that 
the North Station site difficulties had been outlined at the pre- 
vious meeting and the committee now proposed to examine the general 
assessment of the Columbia Point location. 

Mr. Hideo Sasaki then reviewed the highlights and pre- 
sented the results of the studies made by his associates. He in- 
formed the group that during the past two years a great deal of 
work had been done in collaboration with the Trustees and Community 



3171 



UM/ Bos ton 
Site 



3172 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

leaders, in order to arrive at a site selection. More than 50 sites 
were studied and evaluated. Mr. Sasaki indicated these sites on an 
area map. The physical and locational aspects of each site were 
compared. The Trustees had met with community leaders and urban ex- 
perts while the staff of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay compiled surveys. 
As a result of assessment according to site criteria previously 
agreed upon, five sites were considered superior to others. Later 
Fenway Park and North Station were added at the suggestion of House 
Speaker Quinn and Mayor White respectively. It was concluded that 
while sites in the outer areas of Metropolitan Boston are more 
plentiful, they tend to be less accessible to the major concentra- 
tion of urban residents. The University's objectives (as an urban 
institution) depend upon optimal access to the largest number of 
people and urban resources, thus the prime sites were those near the 
center of regional population. 

Again in collaboration with urban authorities and others, 
three prime sites were selected for detailed evaluation: Air Rights 
Watertown Arsenal and Columbia Point. The Arsenal site was finally 
rejected when investigation revealed that the cost of providing 
highway access and adequate transit would be prohibitive. The Air 
Rights (Turnpike) site was withdrawn from consideration because the 
City felt that the impact of a 15,000 student University on this 
site would create a serious traffic problem. In addition, it was 
felt the potential of the area for the City would be better realized 
with commercial development. As an alternative core location, the 
City suggested the land north of North Station. Evaluation of this 
area was the subject of discussion at the preceding meeting of the 
committee. The Fenway Park site suggestion was introduced when a 
new stadium appeared to be a strong possibility, but subsequent de- 
cline in stadium prospects, as well as deficiencies in access to 
the site have removed this area from consideration. Accordingly, 
site reconnaissance and evaluation of design potential of Columbia 
Point was then made and is submitted for primary consideration as a 
permanent location for the Boston campus of the University. 

Mr. Sasaki, assisted by Mr. Alexander, then described the 
unique possibilities of Columbia Point. He stressed that it has 
environmental qualities of a suburban site with large open land 
area, with flexibility for long-range growth without impinging on 
neighbors. He noted that it is closer to the urban core than any 
other open site and thus has potential for high regional accessi- 
bility. The available land area (150 acres in entire peninsula) is 
a compelling asset in the consideration. According to site criteria 
the minimum to accommodate the University at the 15,000 student 
level should be close to 100 acres. A major advantage is the factor 
of availability. No dislocation or demolition would be involved; 
preparation and construction would be contingent only on archi- 
tectural and engineering planning and funding. 

Mr. Sasaki touched on the reported plans for 1,000 units 
of middle income housing at Columbia Point. He stated the pro- 
vision of such a residential complex would be compatible with 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

University objectives and community needs, provided it were suit- 
ably located in an area which would not impinge upon the site en- 
visioned for University development. With reference to the rumored 
World's Fair plan for the harbor area, he felt this to be too in- 
definite to be considered. He noted, however, that University 
planning would have to proceed autonomously in order to fulfill the 
priority demands of enrollment growth. He described the need to 
coordinate with the City, the MDC, the DFW and Boston College High 
School to assure that the development of the area could proceed in 
a complementary manner. 

Among other factors, Mr. Sasaki noted the noise related 
to the Logan airport approach. He stated it would be no greater, 
however, than the ground noises (expressway and traffic sounds) of 
the prime downtown sites, as the source would be farther away. He 
stated the buildings could be interrelated to provide acoustical 
protection, as well as protection from the elements. 

Mr. Sasaki stated the Columbia and Savin Hill stations 
of the Harvard-Ashmont line are only eight minutes from downtown 
Boston. However, a fast, high capacity link to transit is vital 
as these stations are almost a mile from the contemplated site. 
He described the possibility of a light-weight, automated shuttle 
system, which would be effected for substantially less cost than a 
heavy rail MBTA extension, with a capacity adequate to serve 4 to 
5,000 arrivals. This "sky-bus" system would shorten the link to 
the site to about two or three minutes. He noted the distance is 
identical from Harvard Square to Boston center, and from Columbia 
Point to Boston center (10-12 minutes running time). 

Mr. Sasaki described the Columbia Point area as consist- 
ing of open, undeveloped land, on fill composed of cinder, trash 
and rubble disposal. The site would embrace 50 acres, formerly 
the Mile Road Dump; 45 acres now occupied by the sewage pumping 
station and a to-be-negotiated part of the Boston College High 
School land on which a connecting road from Morrissey Boulevard 
would be planned. This area would provide sufficient size and 
flexibility for the development of a major campus complex. In addi 
tion, he said, long-range expansion could be accomplished through 
landfill in tidal shallows around the site. The development cost, 
based on preliminary analysis, was estimated at approximately $290- 
$300 million and would include buildings, parking, transit link and 
site improvement suitable for a 15,000 student complex. 

There was discussion during which Mr. Sasaki responded 
and described the inherent possibilities of the high-capacity 
shuttle system. 

Trustee Healey informed the committee of conversations 
held with the Chairmen of the MBTA and the MDC, who indicated will- 
ingness to cooperate with the University Trustees in order to work 
out whatever problems might arise. In addition, the Boston College 
High School authorities have stated they would like to have the 



3173 



3174 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

University as neighbors and would sell some of their land, if re- 
quired, for University use so long as access use is kept back from 
their residence halls. 

Trustee Plimpton expressed concern that transporting 
15,000 students to and from this area would be troublesome. Mr. K. 
E. Alexander described the practicality of the proposed "sky-bus" 
arrangement to eliminate this hazard. 

In response to Trustee Maginnis' query as to whether the 
proposed World's Fair use of the area would present a problem, Speake : 
Quinn suggested the University plan would be a plus factor for the 
Fair. 

Trustee Troy questioned whether a problem might arise be- 
cause of the fact that 55 acres of the proposed site were privately 
owned, and 45 city owned. 

Trustee Healey responded that, assuming the Legislature 
appropriated the money, there should be no problem. 



There was discussion of the overhead noise factor. Trusted 
Healey stated that Boston College High advised they found it livable 
and expected to remain in the location. Speaker Quinn observed that 
as a graduate of this school, he could speak from personal knowledge 
and that the problem was minimal. He noted he would be happy to 
support any location the committee recommended. He stated he had 
favored a core city site, but thought this impossible and the next 
best thing would be Columbia Point. He stated he believed the 
Legislature would give every support possible to assure education 
for the young people in a permanent spot. He noted that this 
particular recommendation seems to meet with minimal objection, and 
pointed out that (1) there is no housing to be displaced, (2) no 
industry to be displaced and (3) no taxes to be withdrawn. He ex- 
pressed the opinion that it was a far more attractive site than the 
North Station proposal. The Speaker pointed out that, in 1630, all 
of the Back Bay area was marshland, 607„ under water. He suggested 
the present day protestors should think of this. Consideration 
should not be the graduating class of 1969 or 1979, but 1999. This 
area may well be in the center of things then. 

The Speaker stated that the Trustees have the decision to 
make. He recalled that it was almost four years ago that Senator 
Kenneally, Speaker Quinn and Senator Donahue introduced legislation 
authorizing UM at Boston. Alluding to the fact that student and 
faculty demonstrators had petitioned for 30 days' delay in the de- 
cision, he stated, "we could give you 30 days to think it over, or 
30 years, but you cannot find perfection." 

Speaker Quinn expressed his full support of any site se- 
lection decision made by the Board of Trustees. He then left the 
meeting. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Senator Kenneally endorsed the Speaker's statement, but 
stressed the urgency and need for immediate on-the-spot decision, 
delineating the undesirable results inherent in further delay. 
The Senator then left the meeting. 

Chancellor Broderick left the meeting. 

Chairman Haigis then opened the meeting for discussions 
and questions. There were none. He then asked Trustee Healey to 
comment. 

Vice Chairman Healey drew attention to the fact that the 
legislators had in effect indicated rejection of a request 
currently circulated to the committee by telegram and letters for 
a thirty day delay in final selection of Columbia Point as the site 
for the permanent UM/B campus. He briefly described the request of 
the new Chancellor for a thirty day extension to afford him oppor- 
tunity to review the file; also, the request of the faculty and 
some of the student body who opposed the selection of Columbia 
Point as the site and wished to have added opportunity to explore 
other possibilities. 

In the ensuing discussion, it was noted that the 
Committee on Buildings and Grounds had given unremitting considera- 
tion over a period of several years to the selection of a permanent 
site for the Boston campus. In addition, an ad hoc committee 
formed over a year ago, worked with the Boston group as an exten- 
sion of this effort. 

After further general discussion, motion was made by 
Trustee Crowley and seconded, and it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they eliminate the North Station area from 
further consideration as a site for the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston. 

Trustee Crowley then submitted a motion to select 
Columbia Point as the permanent site for the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Boston. Motion was seconded by Trustee Emerson. 

Discussion followed during which it was noted that stu- 
dents and faculty at the Boston campus claimed there had been a 
breakdown in communications with the Boston faculty and student 
groups, due primarily to two factors: (1) departure of Chancellor 
Ryan and (2) absence of faculty on summer vacation. It was pre- 
sumed that, due to the combination of these factors, the Boston 
faculty were unaware of the imminence of the site decision and, 
therefore, should be extended consideration. Other opinion held tha 
the Boston faculty and student body should have had ample communi- 
cation as the Chancellor and Acting Dean of Faculty had attended 
all meetings. 



3175 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Rowland was recognized and reminded the committee 
that the Board had taken a vote at a previous meeting to consider no 
more new sites. She expressed concern over the effect of further 
delay. 

Trustee Crowley agreed to accept an amendment to his 
motion which would recommend Columbia Point in principle but carry 
a final decision over to the November 22 meeting of the Board. 

Trustee Lyons supported Mrs. Rowland's statement. He 
said the Board's public position is well known. There is no alterna 
tive. The situation would' not be improved by the kind of courtesy 
extension being considered. 

After thorough discussion, Vice Chairman Healey proposed 
a vote reflecting the consensus that the Board is focusing only on 
Columbia Point, and that this appears to be the final site selection 
but that good-faith, open-minded consideration would be extended to 
any proposal of the faculty or students at UM/Boston which would be 
practicable. 

Dr. Boyden, the Chairman of the Board, concurred, stating 
this is a sound proposal. 

After further discussion and in accord with the consensus 
of opinion, motion was made and seconded, and it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the only site under active consideration by 
the Committee on Buildings and Grounds is 
the Columbia Point site, and to further 
recommend that the final decision on this 
site be made at the November 22, 1968 meet- 
ing of the Board of Trustees; also, that 
this action is taken at the request of 
Chancellor Broderick of the UM/Boston pend- 
ing further study by the Board and the 
Chancellor. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:00 p.m. 




Secretary^/ Board of Trus 



I 



;OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

October 26, 1968, 9:30 a.m., Hampden Dining Commons, U of M 

Amherst, Mass. 

PRESENT : Chairman Boyden, President Lederle; 
Trustees Haigis , Pumphret, Troy; 
Treasurer Johnson and Secretary 
McCartney. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Trustees Crowley, Maginnis, Plimpton; 
Provost Tippo, Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Boyden convened the meeting at 9:40 a.m. 

Trustee Troy, at the invitation of the Chairman, 
directed the attention of the committee to the listing of "Proposed 
Honorary Degree Candidates for 1969" as supplied to them in advance 
of the meeting. He noted that this list was the result of previous 
discussions held at an earlier meeting on the original complete 
list of 46 names submitted from all sources. He stated that 
further deliberations were required to reduce the listing of po- 
tential candidates to the number considered practical for awarding 
of degrees. 

General and thorough discussion ensued, as a result of 
which the final list of nominees was agreed upon and on motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the final list of nominees 
for honorary degrees at Commencement, 
1969, (Document T69-016) which document 
is marked CONFIDENTIAL and placed on 
file in the Office of the Secretary. 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:10 a.m. 




Robert J . /Mo'Ca'rtney 
Secretary, Boa(rg of Trustees 



317? 



Honorary 
Degrees , 
1969 



3178 



COMMITTEE 



UM/ Boston 
Site 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 

November 15, 1968, 2:30 p.m., Chancellor's Conference Room, 

UM/ Boston 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Emerson, Gordon, 
Maginnis, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 

Also, the following members of the Board: 
Vice Chairman Healey, Trustees Croce, 
Frechette, Greenblatt, Pumphret, Rowland, 
Troy. 



Chancellor Broderick, Dean Soutter, Dean 
Redfern, Assistant Dean Gugin, Professor 
James J. Ryan, UM/B Planning Officer O'Brien; 
Messrs. Alexander and Chapman of Sasaki, 
Dawson, DeMay Associates; Messrs. Evans 
Clinchy and Earl Flansburgh of the Ford 
Foundation and Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting and asked Chancellor 
Broderick to review for the committee the proposal of the UM/ Boston 
faculty and student body of an alternate plan for location of the 
permanent Boston campus. 

Chancellor Broderick briefly summarized events leading to 
postponement of the announcement by the Trustees of selection of a 
permanent site for UM at Boston at the meeting of October 14. 

Since that date, studies and investigation have led to a 
proposal for a core city location which seeks to meet the needs of 
the University in an interesting and creative way. A new element 
brought into the site search is a proposed gift of land in the 
south end, amounting to approximately six acres. The Chancellor 
stated he was not free to divulge the identity of the donor at this 
time, but with this as the core, it appeared feasible to explore 
the south end to find space to build the University in Boston. 
Under a new concept, his group is seeking "not a site, but space." 
Chancellor Broderick explained this is an entirely different 
approach in that a contiguous body of acres is not sought, but mere- 
ly space that will permit the University to serve its educational 
purpose as an urban university in the core city. 



search: 



The Chancellor stated that three factors guided the 

(1) Urgency of core location 

(2) Desire to add to the city of Boston 

(3) Need to create physical setting that would 
allow the University to adapt to need for 
innovation in educating. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chancellor next employed maps of the area to demon- 
strate the several locations under consideration. He pointed out 
present occupation and other salient factors. He stated that with 
the gift of space as a starting point, he had spoken with the BRA 
exploring the possibility of using space in the area covering 
approximately 40 acres (one million and a half square feet) . 
Boundaries included Washington Street, over Dover, down to Albany/ 
Maiden, which would provide 21 acres. A mixed-use would be planned 
This could include the University, other institutions, private 
housing, possibly some industry. The Chancellor stated the plan 
envisions separate units; a non-contiguous campus. The program 
proposes moving in and around the existing residential buildings, 
thus insuring that no one is displaced. 

Air rights over the Massachusetts Turnpike are proposed 
as part of the plan, from Arlington Washington Street. This would 
provide 4% acres of space which would lend itself to multiple use. 

A third area in the proposal includes part of Park Square 
where the University is now located; and a contiguous block 
(Arlington Street, Isabella Street and Columbus Avenue) This also 
would involve mixed-use. 

The proposal carries the University to the suggested 
size of 15,000 students by 1980. This would be the terminal point 
for growth in these three areas proposed: (Park Square, south end, 
turnpike air rights). Any further growth of the University would 
need to occur at locations as yet unspecified. The Chancellor 
referred to the possibility of expansion beyond this area by means 
of threading through the city along a fairly well defined axis. 
He noted that there is no certainty that the area identified for 
mixed use purposes in the south end would be adequate for the 
numbers of students now proposed; also, that further study should 
be made, however, for the possibility of moving beyond these three 
areas in the future. 

The Chancellor stated that with 3500 students now on 
less than two acres (Park Square) subsequent growth is planned in 
units of 2200 to reach a total of approximately 15,400 by 1980. 

In response to question as to whether it is possible to 
negotiate for any of this space, the Chancellor stated he is not 
certain, but is hopeful. He advised that a meeting with the Mayor 
and the BRA on November 19 should clarify some of these issues. 
In the meantime, the possibilities inherent in the plan have been 
explored with spokesmen for the south end community, as well as 
with members of the Legislature. 

Discussion ensued. This encompassed the physical plan 
proposed, which Dr. Broderick said will allow change to occur as 
needs are perceived. He pointed out that smaller administrative 
units can experiment with programs without affecting the entire 
university. He noted that the smaller units could afford greater 

academic intimacy and permit greater emphasis on dealing with 



3179 



318 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

students as individuals. Pedestrian time consumed in covering 
distances between the separated units in the proposal was described 
as comparable to that involved on the Amherst campus. 

Chancellor Broderlck advised that discussion had been 
held with Speaker Quinn relative to this new proposal. The Speaker 
has agreed to support the University position if this should 
become the final decision. 

Trustees Crowley and Pumphret referred to the undesirable 
milieu of the south end area proposed for the campus. They were 
advised that with the passage of time (10 to 15 years, by which 
time the campus would be completed) conditions should have improved 
The Chancellor stated that, although this section is part of a 
planned urban renewal area, the BRA has indicated that the specific 
section outlined is not yet committed to irrevocable plan and 
fruitful discussions were possible. It is not expected that would 
be community resistance to the University plan. A conference is 
scheduled for Monday with the Turnpike authorities to explore the 
possibilities for that part of the proposal. 

General discussion followed. Question was raised whether 
in fact the University should be split up throughout the city; also, 
whether the concept outlined by the Chancellor is not rather the 
role of the community college instead of the University. Comparison 
was drawn between Columbia Point which would afford the advantages 
of a unified campus with opportunity for expansion, (plus the pre- 
sent Park Square location which will continue in use) and the pro- 
posal for a non-contiguous campus. Mr. K. E. Alexander of Sasaki, 
Dawson, DeMay Associates was invited to define the advantages and 
disadvantages of these sites. He said there are three new elements 
in the current discussion of an in-city site: 

(1) The five to six acres available as a gift. 

(2) Presence of a new BRA Redevelopment 

director - bringing a fresh viewpoint. 

(3) Idea of cluster of sites - not single 

contiguous site. 

Mr. Alexander discussed transit accessibility at each 
location. He described various areas throughout Boston and 
ascribed ratings. He stated that Columbia Point could not be ser- 
viced adequately by bus. However, multiple non-contiguous sites in 
the core city would be populated possibly by one-third of the total 
number of students at one time in one area, perhaps could be ser- 
viced feasibly by this type of transport. 

Trustee Maginnis commented that the UM/Boston student- 
faculty proposal represents a whole new concept and must be con- 
sidered by the Trustees in terms of how to service and administer 
such a divided campus. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor James Ryan, speaking on behalf of the UM/ Bos tor 
faculty, stated that on the basic question of establishing a non- 
contiguous campus, those who would work there should be listened 
to most. For the Trustees to decide they like the single unit 
campus, for example, "would not be fair." Ryan stated that break 
ing up a student body of 15,000 into smaller academic units lends 
itself well to the "ideas of the future." It would provide oppor 
tunity for students to identify. The campus would be within walk 
ing distance; there is no "atomization. " The idea provides 
immediacy with museums and galleries. Professor Ryan said the 
majority of the faculty (though not all, notably the scientists) 
are strongly in support of staying in the core City of Boston on 
the multiple space plan. The idea of a single unit campus is 
nostalgic, and is one the faculty does not share. 

Trustee Gordon questioned whether the faculty would 
rather work in converted old warehouses (available in the afore- 
mentioned location) than in new buildings such as would be pro- 
vided at Columbia Point. Professor Ryan replied that the situation 
is different now; this is an operating University, complete with 
faculty. 



Trustee Emerson ques 
combining business establishme 
had been studied. Chancellor 
considered. Speaker Quinn has 
which will permit this. Dr. B 
will be erected, designed for 
those old buildings which are 
case of the Gas Company buildi 



tioned whether the ramifications of 
nts with the University structures 
Broderick assured that this had been 
stated he will work on an amendment 
roderick stated that new buildings 
the purposes of the University. Only 
in satisfactory condition (as in the 
ng) will be retained. 



Trustee Healey stated that discussion had not yet been 
held with the Mayor on the current proposal. He noted that 3% 
million square feet would be needed to accommodate the numbers of 
students anticipated. 

Chancellor Broderick explained the intent as: 

(a) not a community college type organization 

(b) a University - wherein all the departments 

would be represented within each academic 
unit and yet each group would gravitate 
toward a specialty. A University, serv- 
ing the entire community, and not simply 
a neighborhood 

Dr. Greenblatt likened the plan to that in use at the 
Harvard Medical School. 

The area proposed in the new concept is under urban 
renewal plan, but is not firmly committed as yet and could be 
changed to allow new major use. The procedure would be to receive 
the approval of the BRA board, then the approval of the Office of 



3181 



3182 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Mayor, the City Council, the State and Federal Government. It 
was estimated that it would take at least a year to effectuate a 
change in the renewal plan. 

Trustee Rowland commented that the year 1980, which repre 
sented the terminal point for the University's growth in the pro- 
jections provided by Chancellor Broderick, is only eleven years 
away. She questioned what provision the new concept makes for 
growth beyond 1980, and urged the Trustees to weigh consideration 
of this factor carefully in the overall deliberations. 

In response to Trustee Maginnis' observation that the 
Columbia Point plan is pretty well in shape, but this latest pro- 
posal is not, Chancellor Broderick advised that after the November 
18 (Monday) conference with the Mayor, it should be easier to come 
to a decision. 

Responding to Trustee Troy's query as to what would 
result in the event the Mayor agreed to only part of the land pro- 
psoed, the Chancellor said it would be necessary to turn to other 
sites, in order to provide space for a 15,000 student campus. Dr. 
Broderick said that as demand for further educational facilities 
continues, UM at Boston would continue to thread expansion along 
transportation lines (similar to the University of London). 

Trustee Healey stressed the importance of the time element 
Many elements are unresolved, such as: who would be displaced; 
exactly what space is available. He expressed the need to visually 
evaluate the actual area as well as to determine if the Board is 
willing to accept the non-contiguous concept. Mr. Healey noted that 
the absence of non-intervening interests tends to tie the campus to- 
gether. 

Chancellor Broderick observed that the city campus repre' 
sents a different situation than the campus in Amherst. It was said 
that if the UM/Boston faculty and students feel very strongly about 
involvement and engagement in the city, the Trustees should consider 
this. The key problem is whether the city government, BRA, etc. 
will cooperate. Trustee Healey pointed out that this cooperation 
from various business interests and public agencies along with 
acreage limitation were among the chief reasons for abandoning con- 
sideration of the inner core sites originally. 

The Chancellor advised that some of the land which is 
encompassed within the proposal is not now on the city tax rolls. 
The forthcoming meeting with Boston city officials should reveal 
additional pertinent information vital to the considerations before 
the committee. 

The University has a growth situation and no one has a 
right to limit the institution, President Lederle stated. If UM at 
Boston takes what land appears to be available (current proposal) , 
he questioned whether subsequently the University would encounter 

real opposition to further expansion and growth "by mushrooming out 
and thus presenting/constant problem to the city." 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Questions were p 
time factor to accomplish 
stating that the key facto 
and not, in fact, the site 
the main factors at each o 
were compared. He stated 
contiguous campus, due to 
necessity dense. Construe 
be planned for the south e 
over the turnpike. Mixed 



osed concerning the plan's cost and the 
it. Mr. K. E. Alexander responded by 
r is the educational concept and idea, 

problem. He demonstrated on area maps 
f the locations. The varying problems 
that the cost would be greater at a non- 
the fact it would be small and of 
tion between eight and ten stories would 
nd; and between nine and thirteen stories 
use is proposed. 



3183 



Vice Chairman Healey pointed out that due to the tight 
schedule, (one week before the official announcement of a site 
selection is to be made by the Board), it is doubtful that many 
of the questions raised can be answered satisfactorily. The Board 
will not have time to consider in depth whether the alternative 
concept of a non-contiguous core city campus is truly viable. He 
suggested that as much work as possible be done in the next few 
days to determine feasibility of the plan. Results should be pre- 
sented at a later meeting of the committee to which the full 
membership of the Board would be invited. After discussion, it 
was the consensus that a meeting of the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds be called for Wednesday, November 20, to afford opportunity 
for such a presentation. 

The non-board members then left the meeting. 

Dean Soutter briefly described the very tight schedule 
within which the Medical School construction must proceed in order 
to insure completion in time to accommodate students as planned in 
September, 1972. The Dean reported that the architects for both 
the Medical Science Building and the hospital are behind schedule 
on design. The consultant employed by the Commonwealth to 
establish critical path control and completion deadlines in seek- 
ing to extend the completion target dates on the Medical Science 
Building beyond that set by earlier agreement of September 1, 1972. 

After thorough discussion and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To reaffirm to the Director of Building Con- 
struction, the architects, and the con- 
sultants the critical importance of having 
the Medical Science Building completed and 
ready for use not later than September 1, 1972. 

Chairman Haigis reviewed the commitment to place the 
NASA project on the farm land, known as the Rewa farm in South 
Deerfield, on portions of the hillside pasture part of the 
property. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 



Medical 
School 



Medical 
Science 
Building 



3 



NASA 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To confirm the 1967 decision for the College 
of Agriculture to share the hillside pasture 
portion of about 187 acres of the Rewa farm 
in South Deerfield to permit the NASA pro- 
ject in the School of Engineering to locate 
thereon research equipment and facilities 
at various locations totaling approximately 
ten acres. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:00 p.m. 




Robert J 
Secretary, Bo 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 
November 20, 1968, 6:00 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass, 



PRESENT: 



Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Emerson, Gordon, 
Maginnis, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 

Also, Trustees Greenblatt, Healey, 
Lambs on, McNamara, Pumphret, Rowland, 
Troy. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chancellor Broderick, Dean Redfern, 
Professor James Ryan, UM/ Boston, 
UM/Boston Planning Officer O'Brien, 
Messrs. Alexander and Chapman of 
Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates; 
Messrs. Clinchy and Flansburgh of 
the Ford Foundation, and Miss Coulter. 

Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 7:30 p.m. He 
stated the purpose of the meeting was to communicate developments 
which had occurred since the meeting earlier in the week relative 
to the selection of a permanent site for UM at Boston. Chairman 
Haigis invited Chancellor Broderick to present his report. 

The Chancellor, aided by Messrs. Clinchy and Flansburgh, 
posted charts and reviewed the three areas defined in and around 
the South End of Boston near Park Square and the proposed expansion 
through the city to the various areas that Mr. Hale Champion of the 
BRA was quoted as having labeled "targets of opportunity," calcu- 
lated to allow expansion of the University beyond the original pro- 
jected 15,000 students. 



They were: 



The three areas were described as close, though separate, 

1. Park Square 

2. South End 

3. Air space over turnpike 



Chancellor Broderick stated that expansion along the 
transportation spine of the city, when need arose, would provide 
flexibility. The campus would thus thread through the city, 
though perhaps not contiguously. 

The Chancellor noted that the proposed program is 
designed to provide flexibility. The only major development since 
the meeting of November 18 has been a conference with Mayor White 
and other civic officials. Those in attendance included Mr. Hale 
Champion of the BRA and his principal assistant, an unidentified 
male member of the Mayor's staff, UM/B Planning Officer O'Brien, 
Mr. Alexander, and Messrs. Flansburgh, Clinchy, Healey and 
Broderick. 



3185 



UM/Boston 
Site 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Broderick felt the meeting "was not over- 
whelmingly successful." He said that Mr. Champion's position was 
that the proposal involved too much concentration, also, the notion 
of threading the University throughout the city would not be some- 
thing his office would explore further with a good deal of interest 

After further discussion, Trustee Healey advised that 
upon entering the room, the Mayor examined the map as presented and 
said it was essentially the same plan he had seen before and which 
he had opposed. The Mayor then asked why the University did not 
take Park Square and Columbia Point. Mr. Healey then made his pre- 
sentation to the Mayor and Chancellor Broderick followed stating 
that the program submitted was not, in his view, identical with 
previous proposals, since it provided flexibility and the prospect 
of development eventually within the entire city. The Mayor indi- 
cated this was an unacceptable arrangement. Chancellor Broderick 
said the Mayor's position still is that the University should go to 
Columbia Point. 

Trustee Healey stated that, essentially, the Mayor's 
position was that the three units proposed were too close together 
and thus would tend to coalesce. 

Reference was made to the possibility of acquisition of a 
"gift of land" in the South End amounting to approximately six 
acres. Developments (as evidenced by a letter to the President 
dated November 16 from the Cardinal's residence) indicate that the 
availability of this space is for limited use and not for immediate 
conversion to general University purposes. The Mayor expressed un- 
familiarity with developments in this respect and felt he was 
unable, therefore, to take a position without further study. 

The Chancellor stated that the contents of the letter ex- 
pressing the Cardinal's position were possibly a disappointment 
over the original hopes aroused. However, he said, this does not 
rule out the South End as a possible area for the University. 

Chairman Haigis referred to the discussion of multiple 
use, i.e. commerical combined with academic. He asked Attorney 
Austin Broadhurst to elaborate on the legal technicalities involved 
in such a conjunctive arrangement. 

Attorney Broadhurst stated that his response would depend 
on what concept was held of multiple use. The legal aspects are 
dependent upon what is proposed. The Treasurer stated that in the 
Buildings and Grounds Committee meeting of November 15 a question 
was raised on how to accomplish this multiple use. There was dis- 
cussion of amending Chapter 183A of the General Laws to permit the 
condominium concept. Would the Commonwealth build everything in 
the project for multiple use? Dther questions arising were: would 
some priviate enterprise develop? Would each party develop its own 
part of the project? How does this get accomplished? Also, is 
there a possibility of the University Building Authority undertaking 
a project of this type for joint use? In other words, are there 



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any possibilities (assuming that joint use is considered) of 
legally accomplishing any of these objectives'.' General information 
on the overall possibilities involved in the "multiple use" 
concept was requested. 

Attorney Broadhurst said he assumed the nature of the 
uses might be as various as the mind of man can imagine. 

Assuming a structure, used in part by the Commonwealth 
University; in part by private individuals for private purposes, 
Mr. Broadhurst expressed the opinion that the Commonwealth could 
not build a structure for the purpose of having private individuals 
occupy part of it for private purposes. An entity created by the 
Commonwealth and employing the public credit (University Building 
Authority for example) could not build a structure for such joint 
and several uses. If the structure were built by a private 
individual and the Commonwealth chose to lease a part of it, the 
Commonwealth could do so (although, given the practicalities of 
financing, no private individual would build a structure which 
would provide accommodations for any significant University opera- 
tion on the basis of the present statutory authority to lease 
premises for not more than five years) . If a statute should be 
proposed which would authorize leasing for a long enough term to 
warrant the construction which means to provide the financing, 
there is a substantial doubt, he said, that such a lease would be 
held to be valid. There is the possibility that this would be 
held to be a borrowing by the Commonwealth in disguise and, hence, 
invalid. 

Attorney Broadhurst said that whether the Commonwealth 
could enter an arrangement with another party on the basis of which 
the other party would erect a structure, a portion of which would 
be owned by Commonwealth, and the remainder to be owned by one or 
more other persons, again introduces the same doubts as to 
constitutionality as the aforementioned lease. 

With reference to amendment to the General Laws 
(condominium), it would not afford a basis for the construction of 
a building unless constitutionality of the amendment were passed 
upon by the court. 

Chairman Haigis posed the question whether a developer 
could legally lease contiguous land to the University for a term of 
years upon which the Commonwealth could build its own building. 
Attorney Broadhurst opined that this would require legislation and 
involve a constitutional question. The reason: if the term of 
years were limited, it would involve the question of whether the 
Commonwealth could spend public money for a private benefit, e.g., 
improvements reverting to the lessor at expiration of a lease- 
Trustee Gordon raised the question of what research had 
revealed on multi-use or mixed use within a building vis-a-vis 
neighboring buildings or land. 



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Attorney Broadhurst said — if the question is whether 
the Commonwealth could, alone, or immediately in conjunction with 
others (or if alone in contemplation that others would be coming 
along) acquire a tract of land and build thereon a building for the 
use of the Commonwealth for public purposes -- he did not believe 
there is any constitutional question involved if others buy 
adjacent tracts of land and build thereon. 

Chairman Haigis then invited the representatives of 
Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates to comment. 

Mr. K. E. Alexander of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates 
reviwed the various aspects of site criteria, in accord with 
established practice, and distributed copies of this summary. 
(Document T69-024) . He explained it was difficult to evaluate be- 
cause (1) the Chancellor's proposal had not yet been developed 
fully and is still in the negotiation stage; (2) it is a totally 
different proposal and, therefore, doesn't quite fit the same 
category previously discussed. 

Certain key features stood out however: 

1. Transit accessibility; obviously multi-element 
campus would probably be better. 

Automobile access: - one site could not be 
favored over the other. 

2. Development economics: Columbia Point would be 
slightly less, it is, however, dependent upon 
the exact configuration of final parameters of 
the site. 

3. Payment in lieu of taxes: is a question that 
is dependent upon mixed-use. Columbia Point 
has an assessed valuation of $.3 million; these 
stand at $2.7 million. 

4. Site limitations: depend on exact location of 
multi-unit campus. Probably multi-element 
campus would have the edge, due to soil conditions 
and noise conditions being slightly worse at 
Columbia Point. 

5. Availability: Columbia Point is available so 

far as we know. This is an advantage. Obviously, 
site development work is going to take longer at 
Columbia Point, so it depends on how quickly 
title can be acquired. 

Mr. Alexander said, in review, that three or four items 
seemed of paramount importance. On location, pedestrian access 
and general environment: the two sites are totally different. This 
again raises the question as to whether the University should be in- 
town or in a site set off slightly. This has been discussed many 
many times and is one of the reasons a long and intensive search 
has been continued for an in-town site. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

6. Functional organization: the three sites can be 
incorporated within an area comparable to with- 
in the ring road around the central campus 
area at Amherst. 

In summary: on Columbia Point you maximize the internal 
interaction between the colleges and the University itself. 
There is less interaction with community groups. However, this 
factor is dependent on transportation. In the proposed multi- 
element campus a little interaction is lost between the elements 
of the University itself because the need to walk between them 
is not as convenient as if they were adjacent. On the other hand, 
one gains interaction in the general community with Boston. The 
problem is not so much one of physical planning and evaluation. 
It is an educational question and one the Trustees themselves must 
evaluate: the value of this community interaction v. maximizing 
the University's internal interaction. 

Last, the question of availability: this is what has 
kept Columbia Point in the forefront for so long. 

In response to question, referring to page two of the 
document (soil and noise conditions), Mr. Alexander said this 
query arose a t the time the BRA proposed the "Campus by the Sea." 
Aircraft noisewas at that time evaluated by consultants and com- 
pared to other sites under consideration. It developed that the 
jets are much noisier, but are much further away. On the turnpike 
site, truck and city noises were less, but closer. Intensity of 
noise came out even. The difference is that, at Columbia Point, 
the noise is overhead and the University campus cannot be insulated 
from this outdoors. However, noise abatement material could be 
installed on the roof and walls to provide indoor insulation. Mr. 
Alexander said a survey at BC High revealed that the overhead noise 
did not interrupt classes seriously. Mr. O'Brien agreed. He had 
spoken to the Boston Public School which had affirmed this state- 
ment. His personal experience also indicated that, inside the 
buildings, there was no awareness of the noise problem. 

Further questions were submitted to Mr. Alexander con- 
cerning soil conditions at the Columbia Point Area. He said there 
were several reports, made a number of years ago (August 1966) and 
again recently, by Haley and Aldrich. These disclosed the basic 
soil problems in the area. What must be done is to go down to 
clay or rock and establish a firm building foundation. The 
surrounding soil itself, of course, is less stable. It may con- 
tinue to settle, but would not affect the buildings. The only 
anticipated difficulty would be with walks. 

Mr. Gordon called for comment on the educational 
philosophy of the multi-element campus. He drew attention to the 
fact that, at a previous meeting units of the campus were termed 
"too far apart." At today's meeting, the Mayor is quoted as saying 
the sites are "too close together" and will coalesce. 



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Chairman Haigis asked Dean Redfern to read a memorandum 
from Professor Hendrickson relative to the soil test borings, 
(see attached). In summary, it was pointed out that much of Boston 
is built on what engineers call "Boston Clay;" that five and ten- 
story buildings may be founded on large mats. It was pointed out 
that the large insurance company buildings (Prudential, Hancock, 
etc.) are examples of the ingenuity of the Boston engineers and 
architects in meeting the "Boston Clay" problem. It was stated 
that these are difficult and expensive foundations, whose cost is 
well justified, however, by the value of the location in Boston. 
A comparison of site and foundation conditions was made of Columbia 
Point, Copley Square and North Station (see attached). 

President Lederle said, there are really two problems 
here: (1) the vote taken last month postponed announcement of 
decision for one month, to give the UM/Boston faculty opportunity 
to come up with an in-town site, which they preferred. Instead, 
tiey have come up with a completely new philosophy for a multiple 
campus site. The President stated he had been prepared to go into 
this very sympathetically provided that some of these multiples 
were reasonably close together. He added he had the impression 
some gift land was involved. However, in reading the Cardinal's 
letter, it appears there is no actual land offer at this time. He 
reviewed the problems related to a turnpike location which emerged 
in past surveys. Now, a turnpike location is included in this new 
proposal. He said he did not consider the plan to locate the Uni- 
versity all around the city educationally sound. This makes sense 
for a series of state colleges or community colleges, fundamentally 
at the undergraduate level of operation. But the Trustees are 
charged with finding a location to build the Boston campus of the 
University of Massachusetts. The President said his conception is 
that a University should have a strong graduate role, a strong re- 
search emphasis. These are rare and costly institutions. They re- 
quire great libraries and advanced research equipment. They profit 
from having large departments and people who pursue things in depth 
They stress interdisciplinary relationships. The President said he 
felt if we adopt the proposed plan, the University may be mis- 
construing its role. He asked the Board to consider this. 

The President said he has always favored an in-town site, 
or multiple site as originally conceived; however, more important 
than anything else is the attitude of students and faculty (toward 
urban problems) . He pointed out it is not necessary to be immersed 
in the core city to create involvement and tackle solutions. 

He reminded the Trustees that the University is already 
in Park Square. He noted that one gain from the recent meeting 
with Mayor White is the possibility of some future expansion there. 
The President said that some attention must also be given to 
political considerations. The multiple campus philosophy is a new 
idea and will have to be sold. This will be difficult because 
historically and traditionally institutions which were scattered 
have always tried to move toward a consolidated location. In 
addition, he said, the Legislature gave the University a mandate 
to find a single site. 



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President Lederle referred to Document T69-024 on the 
subject of combining public and private financing. He expressed 
reservations about the practicality of this proposal. 

Reviewed also were the difficulties encountered over 
several years in trying to find a site. He pointed out that if 
the philosophy of a multiple campus is adopted, it will require 
approaching BRA, the City Council, the Mayor and the business 
community time and time again over the years ahead as each new 
parcel of land is sought. New tax problems will arise each time; 
resentments will be created. Instead of the city looking upon us 
favorably as an asset and a great resource, they will soon come to 
consider us aggrandizers of power. Also, as the University tries 
to acquire additional land, the very potential of its presence 
will increase the target area land values. 

The problems of administering multiple sites must also 
be taken into consideration. How to coordinate and avoid duplica- 
tion of libraries and laboratories; how to organize these separate 
campuses -- represent difficulties which could be avoided if the 
University acquires a site of substantial size. Unless the multi- 
ple sites were close together (within walking distance) as 
originally conceived, the potential does not live up to our 
graduate and professional responsibilities. The President ex- 
pressed the view that the proposal as advanced in fact seems to be 
"rationalizing. " 

Trustee Crowley expressed appreciation to the Chancellor 
for carrying the matter through, picking up the wishes of the 
faculty and attempting to arrive at a solution. He recalled the 
complexities and problems encountered by the Trustees during the 
arduous and intensive investigations of the past few years in con- 
ducting the site search. These problems, he said, are still 
apparent even with this plan. He suggested a return to the 
original plan (of a single campus site). 



319 



Vice Chairman Healey said the decision is 
one of educational policy and can be decided without 
any feasibility project. He said the graduate part 
will become increasingly important over the years, 
there will be a 1007= increase in enrollment by 1980 
programs. This will create pressure to provide this 
cation and this is a vital consideration. Contrary 
ment made by Professor Ryan at the previous meeting, 
said it is the Trustees' job to select the site. It 
of the Commonwealth that such decisions rest with a 
persons which, after listening to experts, makes the 



essentially 

reference to 
of the program 
The BHE states 
in graduate 

kind of edu- 
to the state- 
Mr. Healey 
is the policy 
Board of lay 
decision. 



Trustee Healey reminded the meeting that he had strongly 
supported, in the face of rather strong opposition, postponement 
of the decision until the present time. However, the Board must 
decide now if the "new concept" proposal is a viable philosophy, or 
whether they choose to follow the policy guidelines delineated by 
the President. With reference to Columbia Point, Mr. Healey noted 



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its availability. He said he recognized the inherent problems, but 
stated they can be solved with time and money if this is the site 
the Trustees should decide to select. With engineering, construc- 
tion and architectural knowledge available today, there is no 
question that Columbia Point can be converted into an attractive 
campus. He noted it affords some opportunities for expansion. He 
stressed again that it is incumbent upon the Trustees to make a 
decision on the basis of the appropriate educational philosophy for 
an urban university serving the greater Boston area. If it develops 
the Board feels that the "new concept*' represents an educational 
philosophy which the Board wishes to support (as against the central 
campus concept advanced by 1 the President) the Vice Chairman stated 
he would be happy to postpone the decision on Friday and investigate 
the problem further. He pledged his complete and unqualified 
support if the "new concept" plan were adopted. Otherwise, if the 
Trustees should move forthwith to vote the one available site which 
has the prospects of carrying out the educational philosophy ex- 
pressed by the President, this is the issue that should be decided 
by the Board. 

Trustee Gordon noted that the original mandate of the 
University was to supply the urgent need for undergraduate education 
and questioned the emphasis now apparent on the burgeoning graduate 
school need. He suggested re-examination of this. 

Trustee Healey forecast that in the years ahead there 
would be a great need and said there should be an institution that 
is capable of growing into this kind of operation. "We do not need 
to commit the format of this institution to meet the crisis of the 
present. We must plan for the long-range future and try and work 
with other segments," he said. 

Professor Ryan, representing the UM/Boston faculty, spoke 
in support of the in-town site and the advantages of the multiple 
use proposal. He said, "the city is where the action is." He 
alleged that a paucity of information had been supplied to the 
faculty on any other sites considered and re-stated the faculty 
preference for an in-town location and their objection to the 
Columbia Point site. 

Discussion followed during which the future growth of the 
city and environs was discussed and it was said that what seems far 
out now will one day be the hub. (Example: Route 128) 

Chancellor Broderick responded to the discussion and 
stated the proposal is not to have a University spread all over the 
city, but to establish each unit available to another throughout 
the city. "The concept is not that of a community college," he 
said, but to offer a series of university colleges. The units 
would each enroll 2200, perhaps 2400 students. This would be a 
University that is not "bunched" in the traditional sense. As long 
as the colleges remain close to the central spine of transportation, 
there would be coherence, the Chancellor said. 



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Trustee Magirmis said that, in his opinion, the multi- 
campus proposal appeared to be "just fitting the cloth to the back 
of the individual" and that, in fact, everyone basically would pre- 
fer a campus entirely on one plot, and this (new proposal) is mere 
rationalization. 

Chairman Haigis pointed out that regardless of the de- 
cision, the present Park Square location would continue to be used 
as a center of University activity. He further noted that should 
the Board vote for Columbia Point, this would not eliminate adopt- 
ing opportunities available later in the South End. 

Trustee Emerson stated his support of the position taken 
by President Lederle and Trustee Healey. He noted that Logan air- 
port and half the City of Boston had originally been filled land. 
Thus, he did not feel Columbia Point presented any problem. 

Trustee Rowland stated her continuing support of Columbia 
Point as the site. She said the University at that location would 
have an exciting opportunity to improve the area and make a signi- 
ficant contribution to the people. 

Trustee Crowley expressed appreciation for the interest 
of the faculty; also, the hope that, no matter how the decision 
went, they would continue to lend their warm support. 

After further discussion, a motion was made by Trustee 
Emerson and seconded by Trustee Crowley to recommend to the Board 
of Trustees that Columbia Point be selected as the permanent site 
for the University of Massachusetts at Boston. 

In response to questions raised by Trustee Gordon, 
Treasurer Johnson requested UM/Planning Officer O'Brien to describe 
the proposed use of a skybus in the Columbia Point location; the 
position of Boston College High School with reference to the ad- 
jacent land; as well as other pertinent matters, including access. 

Mr. O'Brien stated the buses can be grouped up to four 
cars and will accommodate 20 seated passengers. They are capable 
of a speed of 70 miles per hour, but in practice would more likely 
operate at about 35 miles per hour. The firm of Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay Associates has full information on this system which is 
currently in active operation elsewhere. 

After further questions and discussion, the motion was 
again put, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Columbia Point be selected as the permanent 
site for the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston. 



^ 

O 



•3 



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At his own request, Trustee Gordon is recorded as opposed. 
The meeting was adjourned at 10:15 p.m. 





Robert J. McCartney/ 
Secretary Board of Trustees 




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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
December 4, 1968, 10:30 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Lyons, President Lederle; 
Trustees Croce, Gordon, McNamara, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick, 
Dean Field, Messrs. Brubacher and 
Silver; Miss Barbara Sparks and 
Miss Coulter. 

Chairman Lyons convened the meeting at 10:45 a.m. 

The Dean of Students said the purpose of the meeting was 
to discuss the follow-up procedures to evaluate the House Visiting 
Policy established a year ago, as well as other matters now under 
consideration within the Faculty Senate Student Affairs Committee. 

Dean Field reported that all residence halls have, in 
accordance with prescribed procedure, submitted copies of their 
open house policy. Of the ten sorority houses, two indicated they 
have planned programs; the balance do not anticipate any change. 
The Dean commented that traditionally sororities do very little 
entertaining. 

There are about 16 fraternities. So far only five have 
complied with the regulations. A report on the others is being 
sought and is expected to be forthcoming soon. 

The Student Life Committee is in process of setting up 
six two -man evaluation teams, composed of a student and an ad- 
ministrator. The teams will ascertain, during the time the visit- 
ing program is in progress, whether in fact the house is following 
its established policy. Violations observed will be reported and 
dealt with through established channels. 

Questions were invited. During the discussion which 
followed, Dean Field reported that when opportunity was extended 
for students to state their preference, only two expressed the 
choice to be in a "closed" house (dormitory with no open house 
plan) . He noted that subsequently one student reversed this 
position. On parental consent (affecting approximately 11,000 stu- 
dents) approximately 107o of the parents withheld permission. There 
is no "policing" of the program, the responsibility falls on the 
individual student not to participate in the program at his 
residence. Dean Field advised that there has been a great deal of 
correspondence and discussion with parents. Numbers of parents 



310- 



Residence 
Hall 
Visiting 
Policy 



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have written, however, to change their original position. When the 
questionnaire study is complete it will be possible to supply a 
reasonably accurate count of student participation and concommitant 
evaluation of the Visiting Policy. 

President Lederle referred to letters he has received from 
parents and complaints concerning lack of privacy and awkward 
situations resulting from the visiting programs. He solicited 
suggestions on setting up in-service training to educate awareness 
of the amenities among the students. 

Senate President Silverman stated that the Judiciary acts 
on any violations of the student code as established. Area Coordi- 
nator Brubacher said in the event of any violation, the penalty is 
suspension of privileges. 

Discussion was held on the administration of the student 
judiciary process. Cases were cited and the effectiveness stressed, 

President Lederle suggested that the Office of the Dean of 
Students anticipate some of these reasons for complaint in advance 
and possibly provide solutions before they reach the administrative 
level. 

Miss Sparks of the Student Affairs Committee and Student 
Senate President Paul Silverman agreed that the open house plan has 
worked reasonably well and described areas where improvement could 
be made. These included the need to provide privacy during Open 
House for the non-participating students; also as insuring proper 
sign-in and clearance of visitors at the end of the day. During the 
course of the discussion, it was brought out that the number and 
hours of open houses varies, depending on the vote of the individual 
residence. As a general rule most of the men's residences have open 
house seven days a week; the women's houses limit them to weekends 
and in many cases to only two weekends a month. 

The students indicated that there are actually two kinds 
of open house; (1) a study open house (must be quiet) and (2) social 
open house. Mr. Silverman stated the study areas in campus are 
limited and the atmosphere in the library limits discussion. Thus, 
there is an advantage in a "study open house" where discussions on 
subject matter can be held between students. 

The President stressed the importance of strict enforce- 
ment of the established regulations in order to assure harmony with 
parents, pointing out the damage to the University which will result 
through ineffective administration of the policy. 

Discussion was then held on the process by which viola- 
tions are judged and punishment meted by the appropriate student 
judiciary. President Silverman strongly supported the premise that 
individuals should be held responsible for violations rather than 



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the entire residence hall in which the violation took place. He 
referred to the Code of Student Conduct as described in the Student 
Handbook. 

Dean Field stated that residence halls with ground floor 
entry into the main lobby are able to cope with the problem of in- 
suring that all guests leave at the termination of visiting hours. 
The Towers are a more difficult problem, due to the variety of 
entrance and egress. 

In response to Trustee Gordon's question, President 
Silverman stated that on weekends there are more "outsiders" 
present (students, as well as others, from distant and neighboring 
campuses) . 

President Lederle stressed the need for the exercise of 
discretion and a responsible student body, so that our legislative 
leadership will not gain the impression there are no rules or 
regulations on the University campus. He pointed out that viola- 
tions receive attention out of proportion to normal conduct. The 
President reminded the committee of the essential need for legis- 
lative support in order to provide the best opportunities for stu- 
dents at the University. He urged the Student Senate President to 
communicate the importance and urgency of this message to the stu- 
dent body. He expressed disappointment that more dormitories had 
not voted for a more moderate policy, as had Johnson House, as 
evidence of maturity and the exercise of sober and reliable self 
government . 

Dean Field expressed regret that due to illness he had 
not been able to assemble the figures requested by the President 
to summarize the results of the program to date. He stated that 
this material would be prepared shortly and would reflect a good 
picture. 

President Silverman stated that every effort should cer- 
tainly be made to enforce the rules. He pointed out that, in any 
event, no matter how exemplary the conduct of the student body, it 
was inevitable that some segment of the public would find fault. 
He drew attention to the daily newspaper (Collegian) and the year- 
book (Index) published entirely by student staffs, as well as other 
worthwhile projects performed by students. He urged that the 
public look closely at these and other affirmative aspects of stu- 
dent life. 

Trustee Croce inquired how long it took before an in- 
fraction would be dealt with. Dean Field said that items picked 
up by the police are reported fully and delivered by hand to his 
desk in the morning. The area coordinator, similarly, has the 
full report immediately and follow-up is in process by the follow- 
ing morning. Serious offenses (such as use of drugs) are handled 
at once. 



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Trustee Gordon stated that, at the time the House Visiting 
Policy was considered a year ago, discussion was held on the obliga- 
tions of a Trustee (Chapter 75 of the General Laws) . In view of 
this, in consideration of the Trustee position, he asked that the 
students re-examine punishments for violation of rules within the 
framework of self-policing the organization. He urged consideration 
of another kind of punishment, for example, if the violations are 
small; in other more serious cases, perhaps the house itself should 
be under probation. Consideration could be extended to adding one 
more staff person to each house staff. He asked that the students 
be a little tougher in their administration of the policy, keeping 
in mind that the Trustees too have a responsibility (under statute) 
that they must discharge. In the final analysis, the Trustees are 
the responsible body. 

Trustee Croce commented that implementation of the program 
called for continuing, current evaluation by the Area Coordinators. 
He pointed out that, had such reports been kept, it would have been 
possible to evaluate the program as carried out in each residence 
hall and make comparisons as to effectiveness. It had been expected 
that these reports would be submitted at least monthly, so that 
summaries could be supplied; there would then be no need for meet- 
ings and exchange of questions and resultant discussion. 

Bean Field advised he had received reports frequently from 
the Area Coordinators. The major evaluation will be available with- 
in the next few weeks, at the end of the semester. The reports of 
the Area Coordinators have pointed out the difficulties and that is 
all. Each house has established a policy for only a month at a time 
A new proposal is presented for the ensuing month, at which time the 
House votes on its policy for the following period. There is some 
shifting of conditions on the basis of the preceding month's ex- 
perience. 

Trustee McNamara said most of the criticism he has re- 
ceived has been based on activities in fraternity houses. He asked 
for further information. 

Dean Field stated that the fraternities have been late in 
submitting their proposals and only a few have done so. He noted 
that the fraternities have very minimal supervision and described 
the difficulty, both financial and practical, of securing adequate 
personnel. He stated that graduate student couples have proven 
reasonably satisfactory, but they, too, are not readily available. 

Chairman Lyons invited Chancellor Broderick to speak to 
the question. 

Chancellor Broderick said he was relieved that the Boston 
campus had no dormitories. His previous experience showed that stu- 
dents are not fully in sympathy with enforcement programs. He be- 
lieves the move is increasingly in the direction that when "children 
go to a university they are no longer children" and will make 



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(social) judgments for themselves. He felt the University will 
gradually have to disentangle itself from asserting responsibility 
in this area. 

Senate President Silverman advised that the Student 
Senate is now considering a bill to build self-liquidating apart*- 
ment houses. Dormitories keep children children, he stated, point- 
ing out that there are around 2500 commuters at the University 
living in local apartments where their morality is their own 
responsibility. Mr. Silverman expressed the hope that when the 
evaluations are made, that the positive aspects as well as the 
negative aspects will be weighed. 

The Provost noted that, compared to adults, the students 
probably compare well. President Lederle said that in the last 
analysis the students must run their own lives. He then asked 
Treasurer Johnson to report on the current situation on campus. 

Treasurer Johnson said without question, participation by 
the students in the problems of their living environment has 
brought about improvement in the vandalism situation. The 
situation is not perfect, but is greatly improved. A new system 
for operation of the dormitories has been set up this year. The 
students have been much more responsible, and this is reflected in 
the improved condition of the dormitories. Student damage is much 
lower than it ever has been. 

Area Coordinator Brubacher described the process by which 
charges for any damage to property is assessed immediately to the 
students. Repairs are made at once. The bill is issued by the 
local people to the house government; they in turn assess those 
causing the damage, and it is paid on the house bill. The same 
student judicial process goes into operation in the case of van- 
dalism as with any other infraction of rules. 

The Treasurer expressed concern that the security as- 
pects have not worked out as well as they should, due to under- 
staffing. Unauthorized persons enter buildings too frequently. 
Some are students and some are not. He urged additional protection 
Dean Field agreed that this is the next problem to be solved. 

Discussion was then held on the care of public places in 
the University, with special reference to the debris in food areas 
after group gatherings. 

Chairman Lyons advised the student leaders that some 
Trustees have spoken quite bitterly about the slovenly conditions 
found in dining areas; the lack of pride in surroundings as 
evidenced by debris on the floor. This suggested a serious lack 
of morale and proper esprit de corps. 



319i 



3200 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle advised that more than a year ago he 
had dispatched a memorandum to the Dean of Students on this very 
thing. He stressed three points: 

1. Don't throw litter on the floor in the first 
place 

2. On weekends institute special student patrols 

3. Recruit student labor for weekends 

The President said that time and again he has asked the students to 
express pride in their surroundings. He has requested student 
leaders to come up with a positive program of campus maintenance and 
beautification, including restraint from walking on the grass. The 
level of the attitude should be raised. 

After further general discussion, it was pointed out the 
incident referred to by the Trustees was in fact an unusual situa- 
tion. It occurred on Homecoming Weekend with the attendant impact 
of many additional people, and a lack of experienced help. However, 
the residence halls are a continuing problem, especially on week- 
ends, just when visitors are most likely to see them. Treasurer 
Johnson said it is impossible to get enough help to keep these areas 
in proper condition. The possibility of hiring part-time student 
help was discussed. 

Student President Silverman inquired whether student labor 
is hired on the same basis as other employees. The President noted 
that, if the rates were increased to student workers, then fewer 
persons would get the benefit of employment. Dean Field said that 
the campus looks its worst during finals when student- janitor help 
terminate employment in order to study. 

Chairman Lyons then voiced the hope that the Dean of Stu- 
dents would review, among other things, the race relations problem 
on campus . 

Dean Field reported that the Student Affairs Committee is 
working, through sub-committees, on a number of problems, including 

(1) Alcoholic Beverages - The Campus Center will have liquor 
available. A question then arises whether the old rule that no one 
may have alcoholic beverages in residence halls will be maintained. 

A student committee is working on a document with 
reference to alcoholic beverages in residence halls. This document 
will be ready for discussion with the Trustees by spring. Miss 
Sparks, who heads the committee, stated that two or three meetings 
of the committee have been held and have included people from the 
Health Services and legal advisors as well as students able to re- 
port on current problems in dormitories. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



(2) Record Policy - A student committee is preparing recommenda- 
tions covering which student records should be considered private 
and which public. The scope of the report will include the Health 
Services and the registry. A statement on the overall privacy of 
student records and the circumstances of their release is now in 
process of review. The policy has been fragmentary; it is now 
proposed to have it complete. The Dean said it is expected these 
matters will reach the President's desk by spring. 

President Lederle said that comment had been made on race 
problems at the last meeting of the Board of Trustees. He stated 
there are tensions. These have been talked out, and as good a re- 
lationship as could be expected has resulted. 

Dean Field added that the situation now is more optimisti£ 
than one would believe. He reminded the committee that there have 
been black students on campus for many years, but when the recent 
Afro-American Society situation arose there was a focus on a host 
of things which previously had never been discussed. Much of the 
evident hostility and anxiety, he said, was not due to campus ex- 
periences, but to events taking place elsewhere. 

The Dean briefly described the meetings held recently 
with black students. These students wanted people to understand 
their background; they wanted a broader based curriculum offering; 
they were concerned about avoiding any accidental episode, in- 
volving police use of weapons, etc. The Dean pointed out that some 
of these students had come from communities where police relations 
have been poor. Such feelings carry over. He outlined the im- 
provement program which has been set up. He noted that there is a 
militant black group in a neighboring city prepared to consider the 
campus as the base of activity, but that the black students on our 
campus have kept this group restrained. Our black faculty have 
worked long and hard to bring this problem to a satisfactory con- 
clusion. 



Student President Silverman stated that when the 
committee was formed there was obvious strain and the appearance of 
two hostile camps, but by the end of the discussions, the groups 
were conversing with each other as friendly people working things 
out together for the good of the campus. A meeting of the monitor- 
ing committee will be held tomorrow to see how the proposals are 
coming along. 

Chancellor Broderick described as amicable his meeting 
with the UM/Boston black students after the Amherst campus incident 
"Most of the demands were in the process of being met before they 
became demands," he said. He noted that, in fact, a reporter for 
the UM/Boston student newspaper MASS MEDIA was rebuked by the spokes 
man for the black group for the manner in which the paper had re- 
ported the discussions. 

The meeting was adjourn^ f i • / i 




Rober ( 
Secretary, 



/J. McCartney, 
Board of Twstees 



3?-< Y>. 



COMMITTEE 



Budget 
Transfers 
UM/ Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
December 4, 1968, 12:30 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Pumphret, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Gordon; also Trustee 
Lyons, McNamara, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick, 
Associate Treasurer Brand, Miss 
Coulter; Messrs. Ladd and Wood of 
Standish, Ayer & Wood; Mr. Miles of 
Boit, Dalton & Church. 



Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting at 1:30 p.m. He 
submitted for consideration a listing of Budget Transfers between 
Subsidiary Accounts and asked President Lederle to comment. 

President Lederle advised that conference had been held 
with Chancellor Broderick and Acting Dean Gagnon of UM/Boston in 
order to determine the reason and need for the proposed transfers. 
As a result of thorough study and discussion, it is recommended 
that the transfers be made as shown. Chancellor Broderick informed 
the committee that the transfers were necessary since the salary 
account was quite short. The solution includes imposing a complete 
freeze on addition of further personnel between now and the first 
of the fiscal year, except for securing a fiscal officer if one can 
be found. 

Discussion was held on the items and accounts affected by 
the transfers. The Chairman expressed concern that funds set aside 
for equipment account 15 were involved in the transfer. Chancellor 
Broderick advised that lecturers, student labor and other part-time 
services to support the University's educational programs were given 
priority. Since funds appropriated were inadequate, the sum held in 
item 15 (Equipment) would be transferred to the 03 (Services) 
account. The equipment affected would be for the sciences, 
augmented by an amount from the reassigned reserve. 

There being no further questions, motion was made, 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the budget transfers between subsidiary 
accounts (Account 1350-02 Boston) be approved. 



Account 1350-02 - Boston 

From: 01 Salaries, Permanent 
To: 02 Salaries, Temporary 



$245,000.00 
245,000.00 



1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

From savings accrued from unfilled permanent positions, 
this transfer is needed to cover payroll requirements for positions 
filled on a temporary basis. 



From: 01 Salaries, Permanent 
To: 03 Services, Non- Employees 



$22,000.00 
22,000.00 



To cover payroll for certain lecturers, etc. employed on 
a part-time, temporary basis from funds saved on unfilled permanent 
positions. 



From: 16 Rentals 

To: 03 Services, Non-Employees 



$75,000.00 
75,000.00 



Funds for contractual services for custodial and security 
for newly leased space is available from unused rentals appro- 
priated for this same space since some of the space was leased with 
out these services furnished by the landlord. 



From: 15 Equipment 

To: 03 Services, Non-Employees 



$122,000.00 
122,000.00 



Lecturers, student labor, and other part-time services to 
support the educational program have been given priority in this 
tight budget year over items of equipment that are being temporarily 
deferred. 

At the invitation of Chairman Pumphret, Messrs. Wood and 
Ladd of Standish, Ayer and Wood, presented the report of Investment 
Counsel. Copies of the Endowment and Operating Fund Portfolio 
Analysis, as of November 15, 1968, were distributed in advance of 
the meeting. Elaboration on the report was made and analysis given 
of each of the individual securities in depth. Certain changes 
were recommended. 

It was therefore 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity, Kenneth W. Johnson, to execute 
the changes in orders in the University's 
investment portfolio as recommended by 
Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc. 



I 



3203 



Endowment 

Fund 

Portfolio 



3204 



COMMITTEE 



Certificate 
of Deposit 



Sell 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Issue 



8,000 

300 shares 

300 shares 

100 shares 

70 shares 

250 shares 

25 shares 

319 shares 



Commonwealth Ed. 
Armco Steel 
Dayton Power 
Dow Chemical 
Eastman Kodak 
Fund American 
Honeywell 
Union Carbide 





Approx. 


Market 




Price 


Value 


d. 4 5/8 1/1/09 


75 


$ 6,000 




57 


17,100 


nd Light 


37 


11,100 




83 


8,300 




79 


5,530 




58 


14,500 




124 


3,100 




49 


15,631 


Total Sales 




$81,261 


Cash 




21,832* 
$103,093 



Buy 

300 shares 
200 shares 
300 shares 
100 shares 
800 shares 
18 shares 



Addressograph 

American Metal 

General Foods 

Pfizer, Chas 

Federated Department Stores 

I.B.M. 

Total Purchases 



81 


$24,300 


50 


10,000 


87 


26,100 


75 


7,500 


36 


28,800 


330 


5,940 



$102,640 



*Cash 

Philip Sheinfield Fund 
Howard M. Lebow Fund 



$11,680 
5,610 
4,542 

$21,832 



Consideration was extended to the cash position and the 
possibility of moving some of the cash into the equity market. 
Treasurer Johnson reviewed the current situation and recommended 
reinvestment of those funds now placed in accounts subject to less 
favorable interest rates. He advised that while operating cash is 
outside of state funds and cannot, therefore, legally be put into 
equities at a more favorable rate than that current earned. 

The Treasurer drew attention to the three million dollar 
balance held by the First National Bank of Boston. He advised that 
the current interest rate on Certificates of Deposit with that in- 
stitution is 6% for one year; 5 3/4 for two years. After con- 
sideration and discussion, it was agreed to invest one million 
dollars of the total balance in Certificates of Deposit for one 
year. Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 



] 



COMMITTEE 



I 



3205 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 

Johnson, to convert one million of the sum 
on deposit with the First National Bank of 
Boston in the University variable interest 
account to a Certificate of Deposit (one 
year), current rate 6^7<=. 

Associate Treasurer Brand informed the committee of cash 
received for two new funds. The Howard Lebow Memorial Fund was 
established in memory of a former member of the music department, 
tragically killed in an automobile accident. The proceeds are to 
be used for scholarships to assist graduate and undergraduate stu- 
dents in music who demonstrate musical potential. The fund now 
totals $4,542 and request is made to convert this sum into an endow- 
ment fund. Thereupon, after comment, motion was made, seconded, and 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Howard M. Lebow Memorial be established 
as an Endowment Fund for the purpose of award- 
ing annually one or more scholarships out of 
the income to graduate and undergraduate stu- 
dents in the Department of Music; awards shall 
be determined by the Chairman of the Music De- 
partment. Amount of the awards shall be 
determined each year with the proviso that any 
excess income shall be added to the principal. 

Associate Treasurer Brand advised that the second fund, 
in the amount of $5,610 was received from Edward Winick, Agent for 
the Donors, with the request that a scholarship fund be established 
in the name of Philip Sheinfield, who was twenty when he died last 
summer as a result of a crane accident. The business associates of 
the boy's father, in the retail women's wear field, have generously 
contributed toward this fund and it is expected to continue to grow 
until it reaches proportions approximately $10,000. Although the 
young man was not a student at the University, he had always ex- 
pressed a keen interest in this institution. The income is, there- 
fore, to be used as an award to a deserving male student in good 
standing at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and otherwise 
without restriction. After further discussion and on motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Philip Sheinfield Scholarship fund be 
established as an Endowment Fund in accordance 
with the terms of the Trust Agreement received 
from Edward Winick, Agent for 'the Donors, and 
that the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, be 
authorized to execute said instrument on behalf 
of the Board of Trustees. 



Howard M. 
Lebow 
Memorial 
Fund 



Philip 
Sheinfield 
Scholarship 
Fund 



3206 



COMMITTEE 



Summer 
Counseling 
Fee - Increase 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Pumphret introduced discussion of a memorandum 
supplied to the members of the committee in advance of the meeting 
proposing an increase in the summer counseling fee from $15 to $30 
for entering freshman students and from $6 to $15 for transfer stu- 
dents. In response to the Chairman's request for details of the 
facilities which are provided for this fee, Dean Field summarized 
the program. He explained that the fee includes room and board for 
two days J and a program which includes academic placement testing 
and counseling, academic and extra-curricular orientation as well as 
pre-registration for first semester courses. The program includes 
experiences designed to introduce the student to academic problems 
which will be encountered; The purpose of these activities is to 
assist the student to select courses, plan an academic program, and 
get acquainted with the University, all with the guidance of 
specially trained staff members familiar with course pre-requisites 
for the major fields of study. 

Dean Field said in addition to the testing and course 
planning, the freshmen have an opportunity to experience residence 
hall living. The students are provided lodging for two nights in 
Southwest Residential College. They learn something about house 
government, cultural programs and other aspects of academic and 
extra-curricular life. On the last day of the three-day session, 
a program is provided for the parents of freshmen. This program is 
designed to acquaint the parents with the University, its facilities, 
personnel and opportunities for their children. A parents' seminar 
is conducted which provides a means of open dialogue about the new 
environment their children are about to enter. 

Dean Field advised that approximately 1,000 transfer stu- 
dents are accommodated for one of three separate twenty- four hour 
sessions, including an overnight stay in Southwest. At that time 
academic and extra-curricular orientation and pre-registration for 
the fall semester courses is provided. 

President Lederle noted that the fee has remained constant 
since 1958, in spite of the rapidly rising costs. He advised that 
although the board and room aspects are covered by the fee, 
personnel costs have been absorbed by 03 funds, and it is unfortunat^ 
that the necessary increase has been delayed until the figure has 
escalated to $30. He noted that the Trustees have never had a 
detailed explaination of what the costs are on the summer counseling 
program, nor the purpose of it. He described it as an enrichment 
program, one which is vital to the University and which makes the 
University a better institution. 

Chairman Pumphret suggested that a special presentation, 
including a briefing of this program, be prepared for the Board of 
Trustees at the time the proposal is submitted. He noted that it is 
obviously impossible to provide two or two and one-half days board 
and room for $15. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they increase the Summer Counseling Fee to 
thirty dollars ($30.00) for entering fresh- 
man students and fifteen dollars ($15.00) 
for transfer students applying for admission 
to the University of Massachusetts - Amherst 
and to authorize the establishment of the 
Summer Counseling Trust Fund as a depository 
for said fees and to further authorize the 
director to operate the program as an 
auxiliary enterprise based upon a fiscal 
year budget beginning January 1, 1969. 

Discussion was then held on the laboratory fee for the 
Nursery School. This fee provides special supplies and pays for 
certain operating costs for children attending the University 
Nursery School. The fee has been $25. The Dean of the School of 
Home Economics recommends an increase to $50 to assist in the pay- 
ment of growing services and costs. After discussion, motion was 
made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
effective with the fall semester 1969, Uni- 
versity Nursery School children shall pay a 
laboratory fee of $50 a term. 

President Lederle recommended consideration of new, 
realistic rents for the University-owned Lincoln Apartments. He 
stated that an increasing amount of money is being used to service 
these apartments and it now becomes imperative that the rental be 
adjusted. It was agreed that the Treasurer's Office would develop 
a summary for Board of Trustees consideration in the near future. 

Associate Treasurer Brand reported a cash varian of 
$214.99 for the year. Chairman Pumphret related this to the $120 
million handled, and recommended that the amount be written off. 
Motion was thereupon made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the cash variances of the receiving tellers 
in the Treasurer's Office in the amount of 
a shortage of $214.99 for the year ending 
June 30, 1968, be written off to Trust Fund 
Interest contingency account. 

Treasurer Johnson introduced Mr. Miles, of Boit, Dalton & 
Church, to the meeting. Mr. Miles described the University's 
fidelity bond coverage and the results of the review just completed 
The review covered: 



320? 



Summer Counseliig 
Eee 

For Transfer 
Students and 
Freshman 
Students 



University 
Nursery School 
Laboratory Fee 



Lincoln 
Apartment 

rent increase 



Cash 
Variances 



3208 



COMMITTEE 



Fidelity 

Bond 

Coverage 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

1. the fidelity bond coverage at the University 

2. funds held in custody for the Building Authority 

3. recommendations 

Mr. Miles stated that the University has done an excellent job in 
precautionary measures calculated to limit exposures to monetary 
losses. These include security in the method of handling 

money, the types of safes and alarm systems, payroll handling, 
audit and the countersigning of large checks, as well as other pre- 
cautions. 

Mr. Miles reported that a physical review has been made 
annually and expressed willingness to arrange additional reviews at 
any time upon University request. He said that suggestions and 
advice will be given whenever desired, and noted that in the past 
such suggestions have always been followed through where practical. 
In view of the rapid growth of the University, it is vitally 
important that the security program keep pace so that controls are 
maintained. 

There was discussion durin'g which Mr. Miles responded to 
questions. He confirmed that any funds in the possession of the 
University are covered by the policy. This includes University 
Building Authority funds. He stated that a "messenger" could be 
anyone selected by the University to perform this function. The 
fact of police carrying guns would not affect either the coverage 
nor the premium. However, all due care and caution must be exer- 
cised by the University. 

Mr. Miles confirmed that the premium, in all probability, 
would increase next year. As the University grows, risks become 
commensurate with the increasing money exposure, and the addition 
of activities at Boston and Worcester. He noted that a saving 
could be effected if the University chose to increase the deductible 
feature and absorb small losses. 

Associate Treasurer Brand advised that the University 
billing amounted to $8 million for one semester, but added that he 
felt the $250 thousand dollar policy to be adequate coverage since 
most of the payments received are in the form of checks. He des- 
cribed the careful manner in which checks are microfilmed and en- 
dorsed at the same time, to limit the. amount of cash exposure. 

Treasurer Johnson thanked Mr. Miles for his presentation 
to the committee and stated that report of bond coverage is as 
vital as the yearly audit to the University. 

The Treasurer informed the committee of the concern of 
the faculty and others for the coverage provided by the general 
liability insurance in the event of suit. Chairman Pumphret sug- 
gested that protection is provided through the Attorney General's 
office, much the same as an employee driving a state car, in the 
course of employment. In view of a developing trend toward in- 
creased numbers of suits, it was the consensus that a file should 



] 



COMMITTEE 



I 



3209 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

be assembled for possible future presentation, this to include cost 
estimates for various types of coverage. 

There was informal discussion, during which the Treasurer 
apprised the committee of the current situation on the closely held 
Bartlett Company. He stated their interest in acquiring the stock 
when the time was mutually opportune. He also commented that our 
Nantucket property is used by various University people, including 
biologists, landscape architects and anthropologists; also for 
seminars and summer writing courses, etc. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 




Robert 
Secretary, j: o 



McCartney 
rd of Trustee/ 




3210 



COMMITTEE 



Department of 
Hotel and 
Restaurant 
Management 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
December 10, 1968, 11:00 a.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 

PRESENT: 



Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Haigis, Lambson, Rowland. 
Also, Trustee Gordon, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Associate Provost 
Allen; Dean Hunsberger, Vice Dean 
Maki; Dean Spielman; Dr. Venman, 
Dr. Esselen; Professors Lea, Saltzman, 
Ellert, Braunthal, Paulsen, Lundberg, 

Mainzer, Ulin; A osisfeant riean Rollason 
Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 11:00 a.m. and in- 
vited Dean Spielman to speak to the first item on the agenda, a 
Proposal to Establish a Department of Hotel and Restaurant Manage- 
ment (Document T69-028) . 

Dean Spielman endorsed the recommendation of the Faculty 
Study Committee. He recommended that the effective date be 
February 1, 1969 and that Dr. Donald E. Lundberg be appointed head 
of the new department. 

The Dean advised that the proposed division of the Depart- 
ment of Food Science and Technology, creating a separate Department 
of Hotel and Restaurant Management had the endorsement of the membas 
of that department. The two areas of interest have, over the years, 
evolved into two distinctly different academic disciplines. The 
Hotel and Restaurant Management program emphasizes business and 
personnel management, hotel law, accounting and similar subjects. 
It is primarily interested in training undergraduates. The Food 
Science section emphasizes the basic sciences of Mathematics, 
Physics, Chemistry, Microbiology and has an extensive graduate 
program and considerable grant-supported research. The division of 
the department would clarify the role of each discipline for stu- 
dents choosing a professional career. 

Dean Spielman referred to the estimated operating budget, 
as supplied to the committee in advance of the meeting. One 
additional faculty member should be added with the new program, 
though efforts will be extended to operate in the interim on the 
present basis. Professor Lundberg estimated that at least one 
additional faculty member a year should be added for the next three 
years to accommodate the program growth and projected enrollment. 

It was noted that the hotel-restaurant business is more 
than a billion dollar business; the food business is growing at a 
phenomenal rate. The new Murray Lincoln Center will provide oppor- 
tunities for the finest teaching facilities in the world, and every 
effort should be made to take advantage of them. He pointed out the 
desirability of demonstrating that the University is serving the in- 
dustry's larger interest. 



] 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



3211 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The President referred to the ambivalence of the title for 
the recommended new department and especially to interchange of the 
words "administration" and "management." Dean Spielman attributed 
no significance to this and stated it merely indicated need for 
careful editing. The recommended name is the RESTAURANT AND HOTEL 
ADMINISTRATION program. 

The history of the program was alluded to briefly as 
described in the material supplied to the committee as the Report of 
the Faculty Study Committee. The extension and continuing education 
aspects of the program were reviewed and were held in good measure 
responsible for its growth. The committee was advised that industry 
support has been good. Since 1963, more than $100,000 has been re 
ceived in one form or another. The S tatler Foundation, for example, 
established a $25,000 fund to encourage qualified students to work 
towards the baccalaureate degree. Funds have also been established 
by The Stouffer Company, the New England Hotel-Motel and Restaurant 
Educational Foundation, Carling Brewing, Anheuser Busch, Litchfield 
Farm Shops, Fenway Motor Hotels, among others. Utility companies 
have provided complete commerical cooking equipment; Howard Johnson 
Company furnished a dining room at a cost of approximately $7,000. 
Recently the Sheraton Corporation agreed to provide $21,000 for a 
room in the Campus Center. Dean Spielman emphasized that the vital 
need of the program is support. Discussion was introduced as to 
whether in fact this program should be in the School of Business 
rather than the School of Agriculture. The Dean said this is not a 
project, but an industry; it is a matter of educational philosophy 
and policy of the University. In the final analysis everything is 
dependent on support and probably half of the growth of the program 
is due to the extension program. 

The burgeoning need for graduates was described as 6,000 
annually, with appropriate college training programs providing only 
500. Professor Lundberg said that only Michigan State University 
is offering a graduate program in the restaurant and hotel disciplinej, 
although many two-year colleges include hotel and restaurant manage- 
ment as a curriculum. The need for teachers is great. 

Chairman Troy summarized that if the program were to move 
in the direction the large hotel people indicated, it would be more 
likely to gain their valuable support. 

Dean Spielman said if the University could be assured of 
the kind of support the Statler group provided Cornell, it would be 
able to establish a separate school. This is an important factor to 
take into consideration. Motion was then made and seconded, and it 
was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the Hotel and Restaurant Management Program be 
established as a Department of Hotel and 
Restaurant Administration within the College 
of Agriculture, effective February 1, 1969. 



Department of 
Hotel and 
Restaurant 
Administration 



Q91 <> 



COMMITTEE 



Department of 
Anthropology 



Tuition 
Waiver for 
faculty 
members of 
State Colleges 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Provost Tippo stated that the foregoing matter would be 
acted upon also by the appropriate committee of the Faculty Senate 
today. 

The Dean of Arts and Sciences was invited to present the 
proposal for creation of a separate Department of Anthropology 
(Document T69-030) . 

Dean Hunsberger stated that Anthropology had developed 
under the aegis of the Department of Sociology where it has grown 
from a faculty of two to a total of nine. Experienced academicians 
hold that a balanced faculty of about seven creates an advantageous 
size for a separate department. Student interest has grown. 
Ninety- two students majored in Anthropology in 1967. Master's 
degree work was introduced in 1965; a doctoral program was approved 
this year, and there are thirteen graduate students in this program 
The size of the Anthropology faculty is expected to double in the 
next decade. 

Dean Hunsberger stated there is unanimous agreement among 
the anthropologists, shared by the sociologists, that a separate 
department should be created. Without involving new programs or 
unanticipated expense, such a move would provide the mechanism for 
future development. The Dean also advised that a noted anthropolist 
has expressed interest in assuming the department chairmanship. 
The staff has expressed unanimous enthusiasm for the selection. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
a separate Department of Anthropology be 
created, effective September 1, 1969. 

President Lederle next proposed that tuition charges be 
waived for full-time state college faculty members on the same 
basis now extended to community college faculty. 

Discussion ensued during which Chairman Troy suggested 
that consideration should be extended also to other institutions 
(Lowell Tech, SMTI) . The Treasurer expressed regret that this 
privilege may not be granted to our own faculty except on an ad hoc 
arrangement. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the President be authorized to waive tuition, 
but not fees, for faculty members of the 
State Colleges under the jurisdiction of the 
Massachusetts Board of State Colleges who take 
courses at the University of Massachusetts, 
provided that the faculty members are full-time 
before taking such courses and provided further 
that they return to full-time teaching in their 
State Colleges after completion of course work. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Provost Tippo submitted for consideration a listing of 51 
faculty members recommended for sabbatical leaves for 1969-70 
(Document T69-032) . This is an increase of six over last year, but 
is within the budget. The applications were properly evaluated in 
accord with the rules of tenure and the sabbatical policy. 

After discussion and comment, motion was made, seconded, 
and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the list of faculty members recommended for 
sabbatical leaves for 1969 as shown on 
Document T69-032 be approved. 

President Lederle introduced discussion of the University's 
policy on leave of absence for members of the faculty elected to 
public office. He read from the legislative statute and the extract 
of the policy established by the Board of Trustees in 1942. 

A current, applicable case is pending. 

After discussion, it was the consensus that formal legal 
advice should be sought from Attorney Broadhurst. The President 
will include this in a presentation planned for the meeting of the 
Board of Trustees to be held December 20, 1968. 

Chairman Troy informed the committee of a call from 
Trustee Maginnis in which he regretted his inability to attend 
today's meeting and affirmed his interest in the Freiburg Program, 
which will be discussed. Chairman Troy said the purpose is to hear 
recommendations on the future of the Freiburg Program as well as to 
consider the proposed increased budget. 

Dean Hunsberger commented on the program, citing a com- 
mittee report by the faculty group which had reviewed the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Atlantic Studies program in Freiburg, 
Germany (Document T69-029) . 

The Dean noted the report recommended that the program be 
continued, but with change of emphasis. He requested approval of 
plans for the new program so that negotiations can begin with the 
University of Freiburg to determine whether the changes proposed 
would also be acceptable there. 

In essence, the proposed changes would more closely meet 
the original purpose of the Atlantic Studies plan by furthering 
graduate education in the humanities and social sciences, yet pro- 
vide opportunities for undergraduates, Dean Hunsberger said. The 
University has lagged in the field of foreign study programs, he 
added, compared with other major universities. The proposed long- 
range program would increase the University's stature. In order to 
establish full communication between our faculty and students and 
their counterparts in Freiburg, the committee considers an exchange 



3213 



Sabbatical 
Leave 

Recommendations 
for 1969-70 

Leave of 
Absence for 
faculty elected 
to public 
office 



Freiburg 
Proposal 



Atlantic 
Studies 
Center 
Program 



3214 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of faculty and students Important to the success of the new concept. 
The recommendations include 

1. Faculty - hope to have our faculty appointed as visiting 
faculty members at Ereiburg whose courses would be" listed 
in Freiburg catalogue along with regular courses at the 
institution. The courses would be open to anyone at the 
University. Reciprocally - the University of Massachusetts 
would invite professors of the University of Freiburg as 
visiting professors to the Amherst campus. 

The qualifications and financial arrangements are set 
forth in Document T69-029 (attached herewith) . 

2. Students - would be predominantly graduate students, with 
provision for outstanding undergraduates. It is suggested 
that students would receive maximum benefit from their 
study abroad by taking some work outside their special 
discipline when compatible with their overall program. 



Change in name of the program 
chusetts Center at Freiburg. 



to University of Massa- 



The Dean said it is hoped to strengthen and expand the 
offerings by making the recommended revisions, which are not major, 
or too far beyond the present program, except for the exchange 
program with Freiburg. 

Chairman Troy inquired whether there was any evidence that 
Freiburg would welcome the proposed plan. Professor Paulsen re- 
sponded that informal discussion with Professor Mauser of that 
faculty had indicated no objection, but this is still subject to 
formal action. 

Chairman Troy questioned the reason for the change in the 
name of the program, which he stated had originally kindled alumni 
interest in the recommendation. Dean Hunsberger replied that there 
had been no real relation between the name of the program and the 
actual program at Freiburg. The UM faculty does not have people 
trained in Atlantic Studies. We have been criticized for this 
misnomer. The Dean said, in actual fact, the program has been more 
interdisciplinary. He noted that the new program will not limit 
students. He stated he could see no way of staffing a program with 
faculty members suitable for Atlantic Studies. It has been a very 
interesting and useful program, but could not be considered Atlantic 
Studies. Such a program would require quite a core of people in 
this field, he said. 

There was one dissenting opinion to the report of the full 
committee. It was presented and read by Professor Ellert. 

Professor Ellert held that the definition of Atlantic 
Studies is broader than that described by Dean Hunsberger and that 
the proposed new title is vague and ambiguous. The new proposal 
would eventually lead to the program becoming totally devoid 



1 



COMMITTEE 



i 



i 



321 5 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of undergraduates and devastates avital part of the original and 
continuing concept of the program, he said. 

Chairman Troy questioned what the experience of the past 
two years has been with this program; also the reactions of faculty 
and students who have been involved in it, and the motivation for 
the change in program and title. 

Professor Braunthal responded that the students had been 
affirmative about their experiences, though discussion had not in- 
vovled the change in title. Discussion among the faculty, however, 
had sharpened doubts about the accuracy of the title and brought 
about the recommendation for a change. 

There was general discussion, during which it was said it 
has been difficult to find students and faculty to go to Freiburg. 
Professor Ellert said it has been necessary to take less qualified 
students in order to fill the quota of 25-30. Part of the reason 
for this is lack of timely recruiting, he said. Another serious 
handicap has been the lack of financial aid. It is impossible to 
get financial aid unless the program is approved early. 

Professor Paulsen advised also that the Freiburg catalogue 
serves a different purpose from ours and is published too late to 
serve the purpose of recruitment. 

Dean Hunsberger noted that the University of Freiburg has 
never been engaged in any real way with the University of Massa- 
chusetts program. There has never been any correspondence from the 
University of Freiburg to his office relative to the program. The 
recommended changes would bring about more involvement and thus a 
broadening of experiences. 

Chairman Troy said the matter would not be decided at this 
meeting, but a vote on the budget would be taken. Examination of 
the proposed program is recommended for further study. 

Dean Hunsberger pointed out the difficulty of staffing the 
program for 1969-70 without a statement by the Trustees of their 
willingness to proceed. People are not anxious to enlist in a 
program which they regard as terminal. The Dean further stated he 
could not foresee how this program could be administered beyond the 
next year, and recommended its discontinuance at that point. 

Discussed also were funding and sources of aid. The ser- 
vices of a full-time person to coordinate all facets of the foreign 
programs including Freiburg was suggested by the Provost. 

Chairman Troy said, with reference to the Freiburg program 
that what had gone on was most effective in the way of a liberal 
education. It provided a broadening and enriching experience for 
Massachusetts youngsters. It would be a great pity, he said, if the 
program were to fail. 



3216 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Rowland asked for a recommendation from the 
Provost as to what the University of Massachusetts should offer in 
the general field of foreign studies and for whom. She said the 
question is, "what should the University be doing abroad?" It was 
generally agreed that the Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy should look into foreign programs and consider philosophies 
and policies. , 

Toward this end, Trustee Rowland requested a full report 
from the Provost by the first of April, 1969. The report should 
touch on definite recommendations in the field of foreign programs 
for the future, with the understanding that this (Freiburg) program 
is approved for one year, budget wise, and may not be after that. 

After further discussion and comment, motion was made and 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the budget, for the University of Massachusetts 
Atlantic Studies Center at Freiburg for 1969-70 
be approved. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:00 p.m. 




Rob 
Secreta 




t J. McCartney^ 
Board of Tri/s/tees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 
December 10, 1968, 2:00 p.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst, Mass. 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Halgis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Gordon, Croce, Troy; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick, 
Dean Soutter, Dean Redfern, Director 
of Physical Plant Hugill, UM/B Planning 
Officer O'Brien, Mr. George Norton; 
Dean Picha; Professor Sheckels; Pro- 
fessor Eldridge; Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 2:20 p.m. and 
asked Treasurer Johnson to speak on the first agenda item, the 
Medical School Construction Budget. 

The Treasurer circulated copies of a listing which com- 
pared project cost estimates for the Medical School and Hospital. 
The latest cost estimate had been prepared by an authorized pro- 
fessional cost estimator in accordance with requirements and sub- 
mitted to the University and the BBC for review. 

The sharp rise in costs indicated by the comparison is 
typical throughout the construction industry, the Treasurer noted. 
However, it presents a major problem in the Medical School project 
where a 5.5% escalation figure was included in the prognostication 
and this is no longer adequate. The Treasurer asked the Dean of 
the Medical School to supply further detail. 

Dean Soutter informed the committee that the Treasurer 
and Mr. Chase of the BBC would hold a conference December 11 con- 
cerning this serious inflation of costs and would confer with the 
Governor's office, Legislative leaders and appropriate staff in the 
State House to secure a policy decision on recommended procedure. 

The Dean pointed out that the law under which the Bureau 
of Building Construction operates does not permit proceeding with 
design or construction when the cost estimate exceeds the authorized 
appropriation. The appropriation for the Medical School was 
approximately $46 million. This project now exceeds that legislativ 
authorization. Accordingly, it is impossible for the Bureau of 
Building Construction to request the architect to proceed further 
with design of the project until it is cut back within the 
authorized figure or until legislation authorizes the additional 
funds . 

There was discussion, during which Dean Soutter responded 
to question. Federal funding has been granted in the amount of 
approximately $18,770,000. This applies as a deduct against the 
$46 million. The projected costs include equipment for the building 



321? 



Medical 
School 

Construction 
Budget 



3218 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Any delay now will result in a further escalation of costs, approxi- 
mated at 17o per month (127o per year). It is expected that similar 
problems may occur in connection with the hospital program. 
Alternatives were set out as: 

1. give up the project 

2. go to the Legislature to secure additional 

funds 

3. redesign the project (entails resubmitting 

plans to Washington and the loss of a 
year in beginning project construction 
plus .an additional escalation of 10 - 127«. 

The Treasurer informed the committee that the cost esti- 
mate on the Medical Science Building prepared by Sloan (professional 
estimators engaged by the architect in accord with regulations) had 
been reviewed by Director of Physical Plant Hugill and others, as 
well as by the Bureau of Building Construction. The BBC has asked 
Ellerbe Associates to check the estimate. It would appear that the 
cost estimate actually is conservative. If construction could 
begin next November, as planned, $11 - $12 million additional to 
the $46,000,000 existing appropriation would be needed to complete 
the project. 

How to properly communicate the impact of this major 
problem received consideration. Dean Soutter said the reason for 
the escalation in some measure was due to the recent re-bargaining 
of the building trades, which resulted in higher costs. Comparison 
was made with similar projects at comparable schools and the pattern 
was the same. 

It was agreed that an early meeting with the Governor and 
legislative leadership should be held to acquaint them with those 
problems. Present should be: a representative of the Estimators, 
of the BBC, UM/staff members and legislative leaders. A selection 
of pertinent letters from Deans of other Medical Schools having 
similar construction problems should be assembled; also, a copy of 
the plans for construction. Secretary McCartney suggested that a 
press conference would be the appropriate means for providing in- 
formation to the general public. 

Various avenues were explored for cutting expenses, none 
of which were held to offer appreciable solution. Dean Soutter 
commented that landscaping is omitted from both projects, school 
and hospital. 

After general discussion and consideration, motion was 
made and seconded, and it was 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
VOTED : discuss the serious escalation crisis in the 
cost of the medical school and hospital with the 
Executive Department and the legislative leader- 
ship and immediately thereafter to acquaint the 
public-at-large with the nature of the problem 
by means of a press conference. 



3219 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Treasurer Johnson reported on the UM/Boston Permanent 
Site Timetable. He said (1) Sasaki, Dawson & DeMay and Dean 
Belluschi are under contract to prepare a master plan. This will be 
done as soon as the educational program is established and the con- 
commitant requirements set forth, so that a complete study may be 
made and the master plan filled out. (2) It is necessary to get 
legislative authorization to acquire Columbia Point? as well as an 
appropriation for this purpose. (3) Basic overall policy should be 
established as to how to approach the financing problem of the 
Boston campus, i.e. through a lump sum appropriation for the entire 
project or some other approach (appropriation for the land, for 
engineering studies and surveys, for appraisers and for design of 
the first building or group of buildings, for example). 

This is a working session to discuss all these matters 
and the time schedule, the Treasurer said. He then asked UM/Boston 
Planning Officer O'Brien to present the three alternate schedules 
prepared for the meeting. 

Mr. O'Brien circulated copies of three schedules 
calculated to show what is required to get the University 
established at Columbia Point, (Document T69-034) . Each schedule 
indicated (a) Budget (b) Site (c) Buildings (d) Equipment (e) & M. 
One schedule plotted the phase-in by 1975, a second by 1973 and the 
third, by 1972. Mr. O'Brien said it would be necessary to have an 
appropriation by fiscal '70 in order to open in 1972. He estimated 
that $150 million would carry the project through acquisition, 
initial survey, design, construction, built-in equipment and would 
provide first phase facilities for 5,000 students. Virtually all 
of this sum would be required next year in order to meet the 
schedule. Actually more than one-third of the total campus would 
be included in the first phase, since certain general facilities 
must be constructed from the very first (utilities and the "skybus/ 1 
for example). These would then serve additional phases of the 
campus when constructed at a later date. Planning Officer O'Brien 
said the cost of the complex will be increased one-third using 1975 
as the target date, rather than 1972. This is due to escalation. 
Cost for the whole campus is approximately $400 million. 

This plan proposes procedures different from those usually 
employed by the Commonwealth, but used on another occasion in con- 
structing the State Office Building. 

Treasurer Johnson said the firm of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay 
Associates has been engaged for planning purposes and now awaits 
instructions to proceed. A faculty committee, under Planning 
Officer O'Brien, is working on a program. Eighty-five percent of 
the information Sasaki needs has been compiled. The question is 
projection of facilities not directly related to present academic 
programs . 



UM/Boston 
Permanent 
Site 
Timetable 



3220 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Broderick informed the committee that the 
faculty has been working on an academic master plan. Weekly meet- 
ings are being held. A mid- January deadline has been established 
and progress is satisfactory. 

Treasurer Johnson advised that, after the faculty com- 
mittee has developed a proposal for an educational program, it 
should be submitted to the Board of Trustees. Consideration of 
professional schools could be made at that time, as well as the 
many other concerns. The Treasurer stressed that, unless plans in- 
clude the scope and precise listing of types of professional schools 
needed later on together with space requirements, such facilities 
would not be accorded proper relation in the master plan. As 
examples, he cited the marine sciences, intramural athletics, 
engineering. 

The need was cited for an overall academic master plan to 
encompass Amherst, Boston and Worcester. The President advised that 
such a plan is in fact in formation and some sections are near com- 
pletion. 

Treasurer Johnson informed the committee that Attorney 
Broadhurst will advise what detailed steps should be taken in order 
to acquire property at Columbia Point. 

After thorough discussion, Chairman Haigis announced, it 
was the consensus that the objective of the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee is to implement the 1972 schedule. 

Treasurer Johnson advised that special legislation would 
be required to enable the Commonwealth to handled UM/Boston funding 
in the special way recommended. It would also be possible for the 
Legislature to create a special division within the BBC to handle 
the entire UM/Boston project. The University must also have a 
special group of people to implement the program and insure progress 
from the University point of view. 

Chairman Haigis summarized: 

1. The UM/Boston faculty is working on develop- 
ment of a viable academic plan for the 
architect by mid-January. 

2. The legislative leadership will be apprised 
of the situation at a very early date. 

Treasurer Johnson outlined plans to communicate by letter 
with the owner of the "Mary Kelly" property; also, the Boston 
College High School and the Mayor of the City of Boston, indicating 
the University's intent to acquire property, so that it will become 
a matter of official record. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Broderick requested that an agenda item be in- 
cluded at the Board meeting to notify the Trustees of the results 
of meetings held with the various governmental leaders. He advised 
of a conversation held during a recent visit to BCH, which indicatec 
it did not intend to sell property beyond that already agreed to. 
He also reported that the Community Council at Columbia Point, 
contrary to their original declaration of welcome, now indicate 
they would oppose the University at that location, unless the plans 
included housing. Chancellor Broderick was assured by the 
Treasurer that the master plan did propose certain areas for hous- 
ing. 



Dean Picha, Professors Sheckels and Eldridge joined the 



meeting. 



Treasurer Johnson announced that the BBC has authorized 
$25,000 for a feasibility study for an engineering laboratory 
building at the Amherst campus containing 180,000 gross square 
feet. The Designer Selection Board has advertised for architects 
to apply. Results have not yet been learned. The Treasurer then 
introduced the Dean of the School of Engineering and two others 
who formed a committee interested in the selection of an architect 
for this building. He asked the Dean to report the results of 
their considerations. 

Dean Picha expressed the interest of the committee in 
assuring that architects would be selected who had experience with 
modern engineering buildings and who, in addition, would move 
rapidly. He described a meeting held with the representatives of 
Deeter, Ritchey & Sippel and the enthusiasm of his committee for 
the work of this company. He stated the committee's intention to 
meet with Anderson, Beckwith and Haible, as well as others who may 
have applied to the Designer Selection Board. He advised that a 
recommendation will be made to convert the engineering parking lot 
into a quadrangle. This will create an attractive approach to the 
engineering complex. 

The Treasurer requested direction from the Committee on 
Buildings and Grounds as to their wishes on recommendations to the 
Designer Selection Board. After discussion and consideration, the 
names of (1) Deeter, Ritchey & Sippel (2) Anderson, Beckwith and 
Haible (3) Drummey, Rosane & Anderson were agreed upon as the 
recommendation of the committee. 



The meeting was adjourned at 4:20 p.m. 




Secre 



3221 



Engineering 

Laboratory 

Building 



3222 



COMMITTEE 



Public Higher 
Education Day 



Medical 
School 

Salary Relief 
Bill 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT AND 

UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

December 20, 1968, 10:30 a.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Emerson, President Lederle; 
Trustee Maginnis; also Chairman 
Boyden, Trustees Haigis , Lambson, 
Pumphret; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Provost Tippo, Dean Soutter, Chancellor 
Broderick, Dean Redfern, Miss Coulter. 

Chairman Emerson convened the meeting at 10:30 a.m. and 
invited the Dean of Administration to report on pending legislation 
and related matters. 

Dean Redfern advised the legislative approach will re- 
flect increased cooperation by all segments of higher education on 
bills' of mutual concern. A Public Higher Education Day is planned 
for January 15; the program includes general information service 
booths set up in the public reading room of the State House. No 
attempt will be made to promote any item for any particular group, 
but each segment (State Colleges, Community Colleges, the Univer- 
sity, etc.) plans to be available to supply information. The 
booths will be staffed by Admissions, Graduate School and Scholar- 
ship Aid staff. 

Brief review was made of the Medical School Salary Relief 
Bill introduced by Senator John Conte of Worcester. This bill 
would allow the Board of Trustees to appoint members of the Univer- 
sity Medical School faculty without the restriction of the state 
general salary schedule ceiling. The need for support of this bill 
by those interested in the continued development of a high quality 
Medical School was stressed. Interested alumni have been supplied 
copies of Document T69-035 which supplies answers to the most 
commonly posed questions on this matter. 

Dean Redfern outlined the persistent problems surrounding 
the bill. Treasurer Johnson pointed out that recruitment of staff 
must begin at once to insure the 1970 opening of the School. The 
essential need (this year) is for faculty members to plan ad- 
missions, programs, catalogues, etc. The number of students 
accommodated the first year will be approximately 16 due to the 
limitations imposed by the Shaw Building. (This means 32 students 
in the second year of operation). The University will, however, 
continue to use this building for medical education purposes for 
two years and possibly longer. 

In order to advance individual as well as broad general 
support for this bill, it was agreed to call a dinner meeting of 

the Worcester delegation. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



il 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Considered next were the drafts of bills filed by the 
Board of Higher Education. These include a proposal to authorize 
increased flexibility in awarding general scholarships (G.L. Ch. 15 
Sec. ID) ; an Act to grant salary autonomy to the Board of Higher 
Education; and an Act which would prohibit trespass upon land or 
premises appurtenant to a Public Institution of Higher Learning 
(Ch. 266 G.L.) . 

The Dean alluded to a proposal under consideration to have 
the Governor introduce a special bond issue for use in the remedial 
efforts for libraries. He described a "spin off" benefit and said 
the librarians have formed a council and are exploring the possi- 
bilities of central acquisition and cataloguing for all the public 
institutions of higher learning in the Commonwealth. It was con- 
ceded the remedial program would be of less substantial benefit to 
the University library acquisition program, which is presently on a 
different level, than it would be for other public institutions. 

President Lederle stated that clarification is required to 
indicate that in addition to the special bond issue two separate 
library appropriations are required for the University: $500,000 
to Boston, $1,000,000 to Amherst, in addition to the minor aid from 
the remedial program of the Board of Higher Education. 

The need for improved communications was emphasized, and 
a more active, sustained effort by the alumni and others to support 
legislation beneficial to the University. Dean Redfern described a 
meeting held with a committee of the Associate Alumni Board of 
Directors. As a result he will supply a compilation of all bills 
relevant to the University and alert the alumni to their hearing 
dates. He will also supply a summary of the University's budget re- 
quests. The alumni in turn will consider methods of lending appro- 
priate support when the need arises. Another meeting will be held 
within a month to continue this cooperation. 

In addition, meetings were held with the Public Relations 
Committee of the Student Senate. Students, in the past, have asked 
to be informed so they could be effective in the area of legislative 
needs. This year, interest appeared to be less than formerly. 

The Dean then circulated to the committee copies of six 
bills which the University has submitted to the General Court. 
These included four, submitted jointly with other segments of public 
higher education; and two submitted solely by the University. (See 
attached Document T69-036) 

1. An Act to provide shift differential for non-pro- 
fessional employees in State Service 

2. An Act to provide recognition for certain Common- 
wealth employees 

3. An Act relative to temporary state positions (non- 
professional) 



OlW*«r O 



Bills Filed 
By Board of 
Higher 
Education 



Bills 



3224 



COMMITTEE 



Medical 
School - 
Costs 



Dental 
School 



Law 
School 



CCEBS 
Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

4. An Act to provide for recruitment of skilled 
craftsmen and others 

5. An Act authorizing the Trustees to establish 
salaries of Officers and Professional staff of 
the Medical School 

6. Amendment of H 1229 with reference to funding 
and expenditures (Campus Police: Hospital and 
Medical Expense, Indemnification for Damages) 

Senator Barrus has filed the latter two bills in behalf of the Uni- 
versity, and Representative Olver has introduced the four co-sponsore 
bills. 

Chairman Emerson discussed the current political situation 
in the Commonwealth brought about by the recent national elections 
and the appointment of Governor Volpe as Secretary of Transportation 
in the cabinet of President-Elect Nixon. Lieutenant Governor Francis 
Sargent will become the Chief Executive Officer of the Commonwealth. 
It becomes necessary and expedient as soon as possible to inform the 
Lieutenant Governor of plans for the University, the concommitant 
problems and to solicit his continuing interest and support. One of 
the major problems to be considered is the rapidly escalating costs 
of the Medical School due to inflation. A cost estimate just made 
for the basic science building is approximately $18 million higher 
than one submitted in February, 1968. Both cost figures were de- 
termined by the professional estimating firm of H. A. Sloan, employee 
by the architects with the approval of the State Bureau of Building 
Construction. 

Dean Soutter joined the meeting and advised that members 
of the Worcester legislative delegation had been supplied with a 
two-page current summary of University activities relevant to the 
Medical School in Worcester. He recommended that in subsequent meet- 
ings an even wider range of legislators be included. 

Dean Redfern then briefly reviewed the current situation 
on Dental School legislation, introduced by Representative Bartley; 
also, the Law School bill introduced by Representative McGuane. The 
Board of Trustees has recorded its affirmative position on the Dental 
School and is prepared to proceed when such a school is authorized. 
The Board of Higher Education and the Board of Trustees have recorded 
(by means of approval of a Feasibility Study) their acceptance of the 
concept of a Law School (Document T69-037) . 

Educational Television has not received appropriations. 
Continuing efforts are being made to secure the necessary support 
funds in the deficiency budget. 

Dean Redfern drew attention to two special budget items 
for possible extra support efforts: Programs for disadvantaged 
students, (1) in Amherst and (2) in Boston. (The CCENS program is 
now renamed CCEBS by the Ford Foundation.) He advised that the 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

faculty committee handling this program is investigating the 
possibility of incorporation so that they may handle Ford grants 
which are made directly to the members of the faculty rather than 
to the University. 

Provost Tippo said a $90,000 grant has been committed by 
the Ford Foundation. In the first week in January the CCEBS 
committee will be more fully informed as to the prescribed manner 
of distribution and other pertinent details. In addition, 
$150,000 state funds have been allocated for this program as well 
as an appropriation by the Student Senate. The Ford grant is for 
one year and is not contingent on other funds. 

Dean Redfern reviewed the range of bills which would 
affect the educational system and might affect the University 
directly or indirectly. He reaffirmed the intent to support the 
common approach to all of these problems. 

Chancellor Broderick briefly reviewed the current 
situation on plans for Columbia Point. Although no substantial 
change has taken place since the last meeting of the Trustees, 
plans are in process to meet with the legislative leadership to 
secure the benefit of advice and counsel. 

There was general discussion, following which Secretary 
McCartney spoke on enlarging the level of communications activity 
aimed at increased support of public higher education, including, 
specifically, the University's current budget request. Some steps 
have already been taken. Since last February, the University Rela- 
tions Office has, in addition to routine activities, developed the 
following new programs or projects: 

1. established a Parents Newsletter 

2. set up a biweekly University Newsletter 

3. completed a sound-color motion picture GIANT STEP 

4. made recommendations for moderate expansion of 
University Relations staff 

5. opened a regular series of programs in commercial 
television in the Boston area 

Mr. McCartney also suggested that the Government and 
University Relations Committee might wish to schedule fairly 
regular meetings during the coming year to insure that the 
committee is kept fully informed of developments and to provide 
the administration with its own wisdom and guidance. 

Chancellor Broderick, in response to question, said more 
and more people are looking for public funds. The schools in the 
private sector have changed in the last 25 years and are directing 
their quest for funds to the public sector increasingly. They 
would not object to opening their books for public scrutiny, he 
said, or oppose appointment of public trustees, as once may have 



3225 



Legislative 
Bills 



University 
Relations 



3226 



COMMITTEE 

Addition of 
Students & 
Faculty to 
Board of 
Trustees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

been the case. The Chancellor recommended a close review of the 
Clark Kerr report. This has some chance of becoming the basic work 
plan for incoming administration. 

Discussion was held on the bill filed which would add stu- 
dents and faculty to the Board of Trustees. Dean Redfern will keep 
the committee informed. President Lederle inquired whether the 
Boston faculty sends a representative to attend Board meetings as 
the Amherst Faculty Senate does. It was agreed this should be 
encouraged. 

Chairman Emerson reviewed certain actions of the Committee 
on Buildings and Grounds. It was agreed to move ahead, with con- 
sideration extended to arranging a suitable conference for briefing 
purposes with the Executive Department at a propitious time. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 





J. McCartne 
Board of Trustees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

January 21, 1969, 11:00 a.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; Trustees 
Haigis, Lambson, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Associate Provost Allen; 
Chancellor Broderick, Miss Coulter; also, 
Mr. Morrell, Budget Director. 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 11:00 a.m. He 
noted that in accord with the suggestion made a year ago, the Com- 
mittee on Faculty and Educational Policy would consider merit in- 
creases within the academic purview, rather than the complete 
range within the University. The Executive Committee will extend 
its consideration to merit increases within the non-academic 
areas. The Chairman then asked Provost Tippo to restate the merit 
increases and basis for evaluating same, as shown on documents 
supplied to the committee in advance of the meeting. 

Provost Tippo referred to a memorandum dated August 15, 
1968 setting forth the procedure for evaluation of faculty service 
The process begins in September when the faculty members fill in 
the annual reports. He reviewed the evaluation steps preceding 
final decision in allocating selective merit increments, beginning 
with evaluation by department head, dean, personnel committees 
and so on through to the Provost and the President. He drew 
attention to the extensive collection of annual reports and 
evaluations lining the Board Room table, compiled and assembled 
for the annual review. 

The Provost commented on the Analysis of Cost of Merit 
Increase Recommendations pointing out that the amount available 
for merit increases in Amherst this year was 4.45% of the June 30 
payroll, as compared to 5% of the January payroll for the preced- 
ing year. Due to the fact there was less money this year, the de- 
partment heads were requested to hold the line, and in only three 
cases was it necessary to go beyond the recommended $1500 ceiling 
figure. The Provost explained the urgency in these critical cases 
(outside offers well in excess of even the accelerated increment) . 
Two additional items which seemed to indicate large increases were 
described as grant funds and not state funds. These reflected 
promotion and redistribution of duties. 

Documents entitled Analysis of Merit Increments by 
Title and Amount of Increase (Amherst and Boston) were reviewed 
and discussed. It was noted that 70%, of the Amherst faculty and 
professional staff received increments: 3.9% of the current pay- 
roll, academic and professional. The Boston table indicated a 



Ow,0 f 



Selective 

Merit 

Increases 



Analysis of 
Cost of 
Merit In- 
crease 
Recommenda- 
tions 



Analysis of 
Merit 
Increments 
by Title 



3228 



COMMITTEE 

Analysis 
of Average 
Salaries for 
Instruction 
Faculty 



Proposed 

Merit 

Increases 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

similar distribution, though with a higher percentage of new people, 
thus the percent of persons receiving merit increments was less, 
totaling 57%. The total percent of the current payroll was 3.5%,. 

Provost Tippo briefly reviewed the tables showing an 
Analysis of Average Salaries for Instruction Faculty. One table re- 
flected analyses based on full-time academic year for Amherst and 
Boston; another for the consolidated calendar year converted to and 
combined with the academic year included listings of fringe benefits, 
average compensation, and including a comparison of the requested 
recruiting salary and the current AAUP rating. 

Trustee Lambson commented that the fringe benefits seemed 
low by comparison with national figures. Provost Tippo explained 
that the retirement system is not vested and thus is not reflected 
in these figures resulting in a lower total average. He stated, 
however, that Blue Cross, Insurance and benefits of this nature are 
included in the fringe benefits and that the Retirement plan is ex- 
cellent if one remains in the system. 

The Provost described the salary situation as "good" as 
related to AAUP ratings, noting that the Amherst campus is listed 
as BB and the Boston campus as BA. The University is about 150th 
in the AAUP listing relating to salaries. He concurred with 
Trustee Lambson that the rapid growth of the University could be 
considered a factor in this rating, noting that the University at 
Boston has a higher percent of assistant professors, for example, 
as evidence of the recent establishment of the campus. Discussion 
was held on the 9.3% statewide overall increase in salaries 
currently under advisement in the Legislature. It was not felt this 
would improve the AAUP rating markedly. The Provost noted that "it 
is necessary to run fast in order to stand still." 

A wide variety of salary studies were made available for 
comparison and discussion and the Provost responded to questions. 

Chairman Troy drew attention to the listing of elements 
that go into evaluation of personnel. Discussion was held on the 
relative importance of these factors. President Lederle summarized 
that men who teach, do research, and also serve as good faculty 
citizens are to be highly commended. 

The Provost drew attention to three changes in Document 
T69-040, pages 76, 94 and 193 which will be incorporated in the 
final document and become a part of this record. 

Chancellor Broderick spoke to the Boston campus. He said 
the procedure described by the Provost in evaluating and allocating 
selective merit increments was, in effect, the same as that followed 
in Boston. He noted that all increases were below the $1500 figure. 
In response to Chairman Troy's question, he affirmed his satisfaction 
with the general procedures, stating the one point in which it is 
deficient is reporting the results of conferences, particularly 
communications with administrative staff. He expressed the hope 
that with the addition of a Chief Fiscal Officer the situation 
would be improved. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Lambson advised he was impressed by all the pro- 
cedures that are followed to insure equity, eliminating possibility 
of personal bias. He noted that it was additionally impressive 
that after the computer had tabulated the data, changes still had 
to be made, the list had to be "humanized." Comparisons were made 
and oversights righted. Provost Tippo agreed, noting the great ad- 
vantage of the computerized listing which provided a stark comparisot 
of categories and figures, drawing attention to obvious oversights 



After further discussion, motion was made, seconded and 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the schedule of selective merit increments 
and increases contained therein, effective 
February 1, 1969 as contained in Document 
T69-040, which document is attached hereto 
and made a part of these minutes, be approved. 

Provost Tippo then submitted for consideration a list of 
recommended promotions (one deletion as noted) to become effective 
February 1, 1969. The list is slightly larger than previous ones, 
commensurate with the growth of the University. This is the final 
list resulting after conferences, reducing the original list to 
approximately half. After comment, motion was made, seconded, and 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
list of recommended promotions for the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts at Amherst as shown on 
attached Document T69-041 be approved, 
effective February 1, 1969. 

Chancellor Broderick presented a list of those people 
recommended for promotion at the University of Massachusetts/Boston 
He noted this list had been screened and reviewed in a procedure 
similar to that followed at Amherst. Motion was then made, 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
list of recommended promotions for UM/Boston, 
as shown on attached Document T69-042, be 
approved, effective February 1, 1969. 

The name of Professor Alvan Ryan was submitted as an 
addition to the list of faculty recommended for sabbatical leave 
from UM/Boston. Chairman Troy commented that Professor Ryan is the 
kind of a man who will make the best possible use of a sabbatical 
leave. Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
sabbatical leave be granted to Professor 
Alvan Ryan of the UM/Boston faculty. 



3229 



Merit 
Increases 



Promotions 
UM/ Amherst 



Promotions 
UM/Boston 



Sabbatical 
Leave for 
Alvan Ryan 



3230 



COMMITTEE 



Roxbury 
Section 
of Boston 



Model Cities 
Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chancellor Broderick then informed the committee of a 
proposal by Mr. Paul Parks, the Administrator of the Model Cities 
Program in Boston, at a meeting held January 20 at which a repre- 
sentative group of colleges, both public and private, in the area 
was present. Cooperation was asked of all present to consider and 
discuss a new concept in education for the Roxbury section of the 
city. This would involve establishing a four-year college (using 
the physical facilities of a proposed community college) with 
faculty and other educational aid supplied by the institutions 
represented at the meeting. Each of the cooperating institutions 
would sponsor a department in this proposed institution and would 
staff it. The degree would be awarded by the sponsoring institution 
Financing aspects are not quite clear. Chancellor Broderick stated 
that another meeting will be held within two weeks for preliminary 
planning. A quick response is requested by Mr. Parks. 

Secretary McCartney read a memorandum from Dean Spielman 
requesting that a testimonial to Professor Wheeler be brought to 
the attention of the full board and recorded in the minutes. 



12:15 p.m. 



After brief discussion, the meeting was adjourned at 




Robert 
Secretary, 




McCartney 
ard of Trustees 




1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



L! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
January 22, 1969, 12:30 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Vice Chairman Healey, President 
Lederle; Trustees Haigis, Lyons, 
Pumphret, Troy; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick, 
Personnel Director DeNyse and Miss 
Coulter. 



Vice Chairman Healey convened the meeting at 1:20 p.m. 
He announced that copies of the listing and proposed selective 
merit increments had been supplied to the members of the committee 
in advance of the meeting and discussion would be held. 

President Lederle referred to a new procedure adopted this 
year whereby the Faculty and Educational Policy Committee reviews 
the academic merit increment proposals and the Executive Committee 
considers proposals for the non-academic and financial management 
areas . 

The Treasurer distributed copies of a document titled 
Comparative Business Officers' Salaries, including those from a 
National Education Association Study Table and the Booz, Allen & 
Hamilton Survey. 

The effect of the State's general salary increase bill 
filed by the Governor and now before the Legislature was explored, 
as it related to the recommended merit increases. The bill is 
designed to provide overall cost of living increases ranging from 
9.3 to 14.47o, depending on application. Professional employees in 
institutions of higher education are to receive 9.37.. 

In response to request, Treasurer Johnson discussed the 
basis for the scale and the proposed application. He explained 
that the Governor's bill contained provision so that anyone who had 
received an increment in the intervening time (June 30 - December 
31, 1968) would not also receive the proposed across-the-board cost 
of living increase, but only that percentage of it which exceeded 
the amount previously awarded. In other words, the 9.37, figure 
would be reduced by the amount of increment received between 
June 30 and December 31, 1968. 

The range of increase in the state bill (9.37. - 14.47,) 
calls for the lowest figure (9.37.) to apply to professionals in the 
field of higher education. The balance of the range would apply to 
other categories throughout the Commonwealth. The figure was 
arrived at by the Governor after studies and comparisons of similar 
state institutions along the eastern seaboard, made by the State 
Division of Personnel. 



3231 



Selective 
Merit 

Increments 
for Non- 
Academic and 
Financial 
Management 
Areas 



3232 



COMMITTEE 



Medical 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

General discussion resulted in clarification that the 
Governor's recommendations as incorporated in the state salary 
bill are made in the light of well established and accepted state 
practice. The University's merit increments on the other hand are 
an entirely separate consideration provided for by funds appro- 
priated annually for this purpose. 

Treasurer Johnson distributed to the members of the com- 
mittee copies of a document entitled "Physical Plant Department 
Professional Evaluation Manual, 1969." He announced that Mr. 
Hugill, Director of the Physical Plant, will retire on April 1, 
1969. A nationwide search will be conducted for a suitable replace- 
ment. 

Treasurer Johnson distributed to the committee, copies of 
tables providing comparisons of salaries with other comparable 
state positions. He informed the meeting that a Booz, Allen & 
Hamilton survey would also be supplied to them within a few days 
which would include a full comparison of academic and other 
positions throughout the University. 

The meeting then moved to a brief discussion of the 
recommended increments in the academic area. 

Chairman Troy of the Faculty and Educational Policy Com- 
mittee stated he was very much satisfied with the recommendations 
made to his committee. He noted that there were fewer large merit 
increments this year and increments were widely distributed. Any 
amount between $1,000 and $1,500 had to have special justification. 
Chancellor Broderick had presented the recommendations for UM at 
Boston, Chairman Troy reported. They followed a parallel procedure, 
and were also carefully done. In sum, the Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy was quite satisfied with all recommendations, in- 
cluding those for the Medical School staff. Trustee Troy noted 
that out of 11 positions provided for the Medical School, nine have 
been filled and two are in reserve. It was noted that, according to 
law, department heads and the Dean are exempted from the state 
salary ceiling structure. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that all three units of the 
University (Amherst, Boston, Worcester) have stayed within the sums 
appropriated for merit increases, although the aggregate totals 
are smaller than in previous years. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of merit salary increments for non-academic 
and financial management personnel as shown 
on Document T69-040. 

The Treasurer then submitted for consideration a proposed 
transfer between subsidiary accounts for the Medical School. He 
explained that, in order to permit the employment of a professional 
mechanical engineer and certain other temporary personnel to assist 
in the planning of the Medical School, it becomes expedient at this 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

time to transfer available funds from the account (salaries, 
permanent) to the 02 account (salaries, temporary). It is planned 
that these positions will become permanent starting next July, 
subject to receiving appropriation to continue them. 

After comment, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
transfers between subsidiary accounts be 
authorized as follows: 

Account 1350-38 - Medical School 

From: 01 Salaries, Permanent $15,000 
To: 02 Salaries, Temporary $15,000 

to permit the employment of a professional 
Mechanical Engineer and other temporary 
personnel to assist in the planning of the 
Medical School. Funds are available for 
this transfer. 

Treasurer Johnson stated that the design of the renova- 
tions of the Worcester building for the Medical School is well along 
and appropriation is needed this year before the BBC can award the 
contract. The BBC will be ready to do this by July. The cost will 
be approximately between one and two million dollars, including 
furniture and equipment. 

There was informal discussion of the innovations under- 
taken by the Board of Higher Education budget committee, as reported 
by Trustee Lyons. No position was taken but the general consensus 
of the Trustees was that the capital outlay segments of budgets sub- 
mitted to the Board of Higher Education for review should be treated 
separately by segments of the system. 

President Lederle reported on the current status of 
several matters. He advised that former Governor Volpe had written 
to the Department of Health, Education and Welfare in Washington 
expressing his support of the proposed ETV station at the University 
and asking that the federal funds allocated be held in reserve pend- 
ing appropriation of matching funds by the Legislature. However, 
the Governor's deficiency bill does not request a state appropriatior 
for this purpose. The result could be dissipation of three years of 
preliminary planning work. The Dean of Administration will continue 
to explore the possibilities for assistance in this area with mem- 
bers of the Legislature. The President expressed no optimism for 
the outcome. 

Acceleration of the Medical School building program has 
been discussed with appropriate state officials including Mr. Donald 
Dwight, the new Commissioner of Administration; also with Mr. 
Shepard, Deputy Commissioner of Fiscal Affairs and Mr. Chase, 



323a 



Transfers 
Between 
Subsidiary 
Accounts 



Educational 
Television 



Medical 
School 



3234 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston 



Columbia 
Point 



George Bonham 



Model 

Cities 

Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Director of Building Construction. The great pressure for funds by 
all agencies in the Commonwealth, including massive appropriations 
for welfare purposes, funds for the UM/Boston permanent campus and 
other programs led to a somewhat conservative reception. The 
capital outlay deficiency bill includes provision to permit con- 
tinuation of design of the hospital and medical school regardless 
of cost. 

Trustee Pumphret urged that regular reports be supplied 
by Dean Soutter to the Board of Trustees on all facets of progress 
on the Medical School. 

Chancellor Broderick reported on a meeting held with 
Commissioners Dwight, Shepard, and Director Chase in which the Uni- 
versity was asked to prepare the necessary drafts of legislation to 
enable the University to proceed. A figure of $150 million was 
projected to accommodate the first unit of 5,000 students at 
Columbia Point. The Treasurer has asked Attorney Broadhurst to 
draft appropriate legislation. Speaker Quinn and Majority Leader 
Bartley have indicated their support. 

The Chancellor next advised the committee of conversations 
he has held with legislative leaders including Messrs. Quinn, 
Bartley and Donahue at various times in recent weeks. The leader- 
ship has indicated its support of University interests. Recent in- 
quiries from the office of Governor Sargent as to the University 
recruiting program for disadvantaged students were also considered 
encouraging. The Chancellor felt, in general, that "things are 
going well. " 

Chancellor Broderick notified the committee that he and 
Treasurer Johnson had arranged to meet with Attorney Broadhurst 
this afternoon in accord with direction from the Governor's office 
to draft appropriate legislation to actuate the Columbia Point site 
for the University. Vice-Chairman Healey reminded the President 
and the Chancellor to keep the Board of Higher Education informed 
of developments. 

President Lederle informed the committee that the new 
Commissioner of Administration and Finance, Mr. Donald Dwight, has 
been invited to visit the Amherst campus by Trustee Emerson, Chair- 
man of the Government and University Relations Committee. He also 
advised that Mr. George Bonham of Science and University Affairs 
had been expected to tender his report at this meeting, but this has 
been delayed until the February meeting due to the illness of Mr. 
Bonham and other members of his staff. 

Chancellor Broderick reviewed a recent meeting held with 
Mr. Paul Parks, the Administrator of the Model Cities Program in 
Boston. A representative group of area colleges, both public and 
private, was present. In essence, Mr. Parks proposes to set up a 
four-year educational institution in Roxbury which would be a con- 
sortium of sorts, starting with a community college (which he has 
funds to establish) and to which he would add from each of the 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

educational institutions represented at the meeting, one department 
that will take full responsibility for staffing and operating its 
own program within a particular discipline. M. I.T., for example, 
might operate the physics department; UM at Boston, the mathematics 
department, and so on. Five or six meetings are planned in the near 
future for further discussion. The plan envisions 250 students 
enrolled by next September, growing to 5,000 eventually. This model 
cities institution will be federally funded. 

Two unusual aspects are: (1) degree awarding - by the 
sponsoring institution; (20 financing aspects - question still 
open. The administrative staff and the physical facilities will be 
provided by the model cities program which has available $24 
million. Building an educational institution is called for as a 
part of the program. Chancellor Broderick stated that the basic 
proposal is for a four-year college; not a community college. 

Discussion followed. Vice-Chairman Healey summarized the 
committee's position as one of continuing interest in discussion at 
least until plans are fully crystallized. No commitment, other 
than encouragement of further discussion, is being made by the Uni- 
versity at this time. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:45 p.m. 




Sober 
Secretary 



3235. 



Roxbury 
Section 
of Boston 



3236 



COMMITTEE 



Legislation 



Bills 



Medical 
School 



UM/ Bos ton 

Site 

Program 



Legislation 
Pertinent to 
University of 
Massachusetts 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT AND 

UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

January 30, 1969, 10:30 a.m., Sheraton-Boston Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Emerson, President Lederle; 
(Chairman Boyden) , Trustees Crowley, 
Healey, Maginnis, Troy, (Haigis); 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick, 
Dean Soutter, Dean Redfern, Assistant 
Dean Gugin, Mr. J. Cass, Assistant 
Director of Labor Relations, Miss 
Coulter. 



Chairman Emerson convened the meeting at 10:30 a.m. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Dean Redfern reviewed 
state legislation of specific interest to the University. He 
supplied to the committee copies of listings of such bills noting 
that these had been referred to the Legislature's Joint Committee 
on Education. In addition, a summary of other bills of interest 
to the University was distributed. These were discussed. 

With regard to the Medical School, it was reported that 
the Budget Bureau will recommend to the Ways and Means Committee 
appropriate wording for legislation so that the architects may con- 
tinue the design of both the Medical School and the hospital. 

The Treasurer is working with the State Budget office 
concerning plans and necessary funds for the Boston campus site 
building program. The first phase will accommodate 5,000 students 
and it is estimated the cost will be approximately $150 million. 

Dean Redfern and Chancellor Broderick reported on con- 
ferences held with Chancellor Millard (BHE) and Commissioner of Ad- 
ministration Dwight with reference to plans for the Boston campus. 
Chancellor Broderick felt that this discussion was at variance with 
the original intention of opening in 1972 at Columbia Point. 
Chancellor Millard had indicated (and Commissioner Dwight agreed) 
that no capital outlay commitment would be required this year; that 
planning money only was needed. This, in the Chancellor's view, is 
contrary to the University's expressed intent of opening in 1972. 
Chancellor Broderick and Planning Officer O'Brien will clarify the 
University's position. 

Dean Redfern stated he had attended the meeting of the 
Legislature's Committee on Education held January 29. He conveyed 
the University's position on a number of bills. These included: 



] 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

S .496 - filed by Senator Conte termed the Medical School 

Salary Relief Bill. This would authorize the Board 
of Trustees to establish salaries of the officers 
and faculty members of the Medical School. Senators 
Conte and Foley, as well as representatives of the 
Worcester Chamber of Commerce, appeared in support 
of the bill; no one appeared in opposition. The 
question arose of the number of public medical schools 
which had, or did not have, a salary ceiling. Dean 
Soutter will supply this information upon his return 
from Washington. 

H.498 - filed by Representative Bartley and spoken to by 
Mr. Kostanski. This calls for study by a special 
commission to establish an evening school at the Uni- 
versity in Amherst and other related matters. The 
Dean informally apprised Mr. Kostanski of the current 
status of this matter and the fact that it has been 
included in the budget for several years. 

H. 678 - filed by Representative McGuane . This bill seeks to 
establish a Law School at the University in Amherst. 
Chairman Foseca reminded the committee that this had 
always been reported favorably. Dean Redfern stated 
that it may go through the House again this year, 
having been voted down previously in the Senate, but 
its status in the Senate is still uncertain. 

H.996 - filed by Representative Bartley. This bill calls for 
establishment of a Dental School at the University in 
Worcester. Madam Chairman indicated that this bill 
will be held until March when it will receive attention 
along with a bill filed by Senator K. Harrington call- 
ing for State contracts with private dental schools. 
Dean Redfern noted that the Worcester Chamber of 
Commerce affirmed support of this, as did the Massa- 
chusetts Dental Society. 

H.1592 - filed by Representative Olver. The effect would be to 
extend to the University police the same indemnity en- 
joyed by the State Police force. The bill was supported 
by Colonel Marchant, Director of Security on the Amherst 
campus. Funds are requested for this in the 1970 budget 
request. 

H.2679 - filed by Representative Coffey. This bill aims to 

establish a school of library science at UM/ Amherst. 
It received an adverse report previously. Extended 
discussion was held on it in committee. The University 
did not take a position since it was felt a matter for 
the Board of Higher Education to review and the Board 
of trustees to consider. 



3237 



Bills 



3238 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

H. 3225 - filed by Ryan-Vtgneault. This is a bill to increase 

membership of the Board of Trustees. Dr. David Gugin, 
Assistant Dean of Administration, reported that 
several representatives from UM/Boston appeared in 
support of this bill. These included student repre- 
senative Berkowitz and Professor Broderick of the 
English Department. The effect of the bill would be 
to add five faculty members to the Board of Trustees, 
increasing the number to 28. During questioning it 
appeared not to be well received by the committee. 

H.3227 - related to the location of the University of Massachu- 
setts/Boston. Dean Redfern informed the committee 
that this matter had been resolved. The decision has 
been made. Discussion was held to determine whether th& 
decision is irrevocable and whether, in the event funds 
were not appropriated by the Legislative, the site de- 
cision would be affected. The Dean advised the members 
of the committee that funds had been received for the 
initial planning. Relevant to discussion on UM/Boston 
site, the Dean advised that Planning Officer O'Brien 
has been in communication with the group planning the 
proposed World's Fair at Columbia Point. It is reported 
that these plans seem to coordinate well with the Uni- 
versity's own plans for future development in that 
area; also, that part of the Fair abutting the Uni- 
versity site would be designed with the intention of 
subsequently turning it over for UM/Boston use. 

H.3897 - filed by Mr. Mann. This bill directs the Board of 

Higher Education to consolidate all courses in insti- 
tutions of higher learning providing courses in art 
and to establish an art division at the University. 
It had been intended to oppose this. Discussion re- 
vealed that Mr. Mann's intention was to call attention 
to the opportunity to consider coordinating the 
Massachusetts College of Art with UM/Boston at the 
permanent site. Dean Redfern likened the proposal to 
the present Five College cooperative arrangement in the 
Amherst area. 



Four bills filed on behalf of the University were briefly 



reviewed: 



H.4005 - to provide shift differential for non-professional 

employees in State service. This was heard January 29. 

H.4004 - "Freedom Bill" for non-professional employees. This 
would allow hiring of trained craftsmen about minimum 
step rates. This was heard on January 28. It may not 
receive favorable report in view of discussion indicat- 
ing the Commissioner of Administration already has the 
authority to exercise judgment in this sphere. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

H.2978 - to authorize advancing certain non-professional 

employees two steps in the salary schedule for per- 
forming meritorious services. This will be heard on 
February 24. 

H. 1775 - to make positions which have been 02 (temporary) for 
three or more years into permanent 01 positions. 
This was heard on January 13. It will be redrafted 
(along with salary bill) , and probably will be given 
a favorable report. 

Dean Redfern asked for direction on a series of bills to 
be heard on Feburary 3 by the Education Committee (S.511 and H.4138) 

S .511 - filed by Senator Kevin Harringto n is legislation rela- 
tive to the Board of Trustees of State Colleges. It 
calls for establishing a separate board of trustees 
for the State Colleges at Boston and Salem. Dean 
Redfern said the State College people have asked the 
University representatives to appear with them in 
opposition to this bill. Their premise is that a 
viable system has been created by the Willis-Harringtor 
bill, and opportunity should be allowed for it to con- 
tinue to bring about the promised coordination of the 
segments of higher education. The Chancellor of the 
Board of Higher Education, as well as members of the 
killis-Harringtona Commission, various State College 
officials, the State College Board of Trustees, and 
the President of Boston State College all oppose S.511 
It is held that the whole purpose of the Willis- 
Harrington legislation was to bring order to state 
educational planning, and eliminate competition and 
overlapping. Dean Redfern pointed out that the Uni- 
versity has never appeared in behalf of legislation 
dealing with other segments of the higher education 
system but this will have impact on the future develop- 
ment of the University as a component of the total 
public higher education system. It was the consensus 
that University support of the Board of Higher Educa- 
tion position would be in order. 

H.4138 - filed by Mr. Daly to establish individual boards of 
trustees for certain state colleges. This bill will 
also be heard on February 3. 

Dean Redfern drew attention to Bill S.250, seeking to 
authorize and direct the Board of Trustees of State Colleges to 
construct a marine biology laboratory at Cat Cove in Salem. The 
University has officially extended participatory membership to 
Salem State College and others in the use of the Gloucester 
facility which is being acquired for marine science purposes. 

No position was taken on H.4429 to establish a graduate 
social work, or H.2679 to establish a graduate school of library 
science at Amherst. 



Marine 
Science 



3240 



COMMITTEE 



Educational 
Television 



PR Support 
Proposals 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Discussion was held on the Governor's salary increase 
recommendation. It was noted that the cost of living increases 
would become effective as of January 1, 1969 and based on salaries 
in effect on that date, except that a deduction of the percentage 
of increase awarded in any promotions given between June 30 and 
December 31, 1968 would be made from the proposed 9.37<. raise. A 
few positions in the University will be affected by this provision. 
(The BHE is endeavoring to persuade the Budget Bureau to include 
new appointments in the bill. 

The Dean reported that Governor Volpe's deficiency 
appropriation will have no provision for ETV, and it would appear 
there is no possibility of advancing this project this year. Presi- 
dent Lederle recounted the time and effort spent over a three-year 
period in filing application for Channel 57 and securing top priority 
for Federal matching funds from the Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare. He noted that the current federal funds will now be 
lost to the University as a result of lack of appropriation of 
matching state funds. 

Brief discussion was held on Federal Institutional Aid 
Proposals. The matter was left that Dean Redfern and Assistant Dean 
Gugin would prepare suggested guidelines for discussion at a future 
meeting which will be devoted to this subject. 

Secretary McCartney presented a summary of PR Support Pro- 
posals. He said that he had presented a program of long and short- 
range PR support proposals to the President in September. These 
were tailored toward advancing the University's own immediate and 
long-term budget requirements. However, due to the stringent fiscal 
situation at the state level, our legislative liaison people now 
feel that the best chance of increasing appropriations is to work 
cooperatively with other segments of the higher education system in 
developing a popular base of support for increased appropriations 
for higher education 

generally. 
Assistant uean Gugin, in particular, has cited a successful program 
along these lines in North Dakota. The Secretary noted he felt 
that PR support emphasis should be placed where the legislative 
liaison personnel felt it would do the most good. At the same time, 
he cautioned that the Amherst campus PR personnel group is severely 
understaffed and that this point will be made in an outside survey 
report soon to be presented by Science and University Affairs. To 
date, two meetings had been held with the representatives of various 
segments of higher education, in the PR area, and an across-the- 
board media PR program is contemplated including a 28-minute sound- 
color film, radio and TV spots and the formation of a Citizens for 
Higher Education group. 

Secretary McCartney briefly sketched the detail and work 
which will be required by the participating segment members and 
noted that the University would inevitably be expected to contribute 
substantially more in time and personnel than some of the other 
members. President Lederle raised the question of how much, 
realistically, the University could do in view of its limited staff. 
He noted that the Board of Higher Education should be the overall 
coordinating agency. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean Redfern said this approach has the approval of the 
legilsative leadership. The effect would be to create public 
support of what the Legislature has to do in support of higher 
education. He announced that the "Higher Education Day" program 
scheduled to be held January 20 in the State House was postponed 
until February. 

Professor Goodwin's Legislative Committee is arranging 
to have legislators visit the UM/Boston campus and talk with stu- 
dents and develop understanding with them. Dr. Goodwin said his 
committee does not intend to engage in legislative matters. 

Trustee Troy asked for a report on the current situation 
between the administration and the alumni. Dean Redfern advised 
that a meeting with the Board of Directors was held in the fall. 
In addition, the Dean has met with the Alumni Legislative Committee 

twice. The meeting which the Alumni Board of Directors promised 

to schedule on reorganization and the development program has not 
taken place. 

Assistant Dean Gugin reported a meeting was held with the 
Legislative Committee of the Alumni the preceding Monday in an 
effort to engender support by personal appearance at the hearing on 
the Medical School salary relief bill. Apparently, no one from the 
Associate Alumni attended the hearing and we have not been informed 
if Alumni letters were sent on this to the Education Committee. 

The meeting was adjourned at noon. 




Rober 
Secretary, 




McCartney 
)ard of Truste 




3241 



Public 
Higher 
Education 
Day 



3242 



COMMITTEE 



North 

Pleasant 

Street 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 

January 30, 1969, 11:50 a.m., Sheraton-Boston, Hotel, Boston, Mass, 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 

Trustees Crowley, Emerson, Gordon, Maginnis; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Dean Redfern, Planning 
Officer Littlefield, Professor Zube, 
Dr. Gugin; Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 11:50 a.m. in the 
Gardner Room of the Sheraton-Boston Hotel. He referred to Document 
T69-044 supplied to the members of the committee in advance of the 
meeting, entitled "North Pleasant Street - Analysis and Recommenda- 
tions". These recommendations were briefly summarized. He said in 
effect that North Pleasant Street would be eliminated and converted 
into a mall or walkway. 

UM/ Amherst Planning Officer Littlefield and Professor 
Zube, Chairman of the Joint Town-University Task Force, were intro- 
duced to the meeting. Professor Zube described the steps leading 
to the analysis and proposal as presented. He said, due to the 
conflict between pedestrian and vehicular traffic through the Uni- 
versity on North Pleasant Street, a joint Town-University Task Force 
was appointed in August, 1968 to evaluate alternative north and 
south connectors and circumferential routes around the University. 
Extensive consultation was held involving Mr. Downe, the planning 
consultant for the Town and Mr. Galehouse of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay 
Associates, the University's representative, as well as other 
traffic consultants who advised on cost estimates, traffic statistics 
and technical matters. The result is a recommendation that North 
Pleasant Street be closed from Eastman Lane on the north to Uni- 
versity Boulevard on the south. A map was posted to identify the 
area. In order to provide public access to the Newman Center and 
the two fraternities on North Pleasant Street, a total circulation 
concept was recommended which would provide safety for pedestrians 
as well as access for internal vehicular circulation and service 
requirement of the University. The plan was said to provide im- 
proved circulation around the campus for through traffic and con- 
tinuity between town centers. The detail of the plan is set forth 
in attached document. It is proposed to develop the program in 
three phases: funds to be provided in the University capital outlay 
budget of fiscal 1970 for the first phase and from fiscal year 1971 
through 1973 for the second phase. The third phase is as yet un- 
resolved since it is dependent on consultation and cooperation with 
the State Highway Department. The phases were delineated in detail 
and are set forth in Document T69-044. 

Chairman Zube of the joint task force stated that the 
closing of North Pleasant Street and adoption of a total circulation 
concept together with the staging plan are unanimously recommended 
by the Town-University Task Force members. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The proposal has also received the endorsement of the 
Campus Master Planning Committee, as well as the approval of the 
President, Provost and Treasurer. It will be presented to the 
County Commissioner upon receipt of favorable consideration by the 
Board of Trustees. Chairman Haigis noted the total cost would 
approximate $3.5 million. 



After discussion and comment, motion was made, seconded, 



and it was 



VOTED: 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the basic concept for the closing of North 
Pleasant Street and adoption of a total 
traffic circulation plan for the Amherst 
campus be approved. 



Treasurer Johnson informed the committee of a meeting 
held with Commissioner Dwight, Commissioner Shepard and BBC Director 
Chase with reference to the Boston campus. Discussion was held on 
plans for the entire project. The desirability of a message from 
the Governor by February was stressed, 

together with a 
recommendation to the Legislature to accomplish all the things that 
must be done at Columbia Point. A figure of $150 million to 
accommodate the first phase for 5,000 students was projected. After 
thorough discussion, in accord with request, Treasurer Johnson and 
Chancellor Broderick arranged with Attorney Broadhurst to prepare 
the draft of enabling legislation to be submitted. Attorney 
Broadhurst subsequently met and discussed preliminary drafts with 
Commissioner Shepard. Mr. Shepard asked him to proceed as quickly 
as possible. 

The Treasurer reported that, due to the cost escalation 
of the Medical School discussed at a previous meeting, the work is 
at a standstill pending further legislative action. The Com- 
missioners have submitted a special capital outlay request to the 
Ways and Means Committee of the Legislature. If this is acted on 
favorably, design work on the Medical School science building and 
teaching hospital will be able to proceed. 

Treasurer Johnson notified the committee of a letter re- 
ceived from John C. Collins, Chief, Bureau of Environmental Sanita- 
tion, Department of Public Health, directing discontinuance of 
burning of rubbish on open dumps on the Amherst campus. He re- 
viewed the efforts made to solve the problem by sanitary fill on a 
new location last year. This method also has been abandoned due to 
complaints. Efforts have been initiated to design an incinerator 
operation within the power plant, but appropriations were curtailed 
Capital outlay funds have been requested for this project. Every 
effort will be extended to solve this difficult problem. 

A letter from Mr. Evan Johnston, Executive Vice President 
of the Associate Alumni, asking that a plaque be placed on the 
Whitmore Administration Building indicating that this site was that 
of the original Alumni Field was read to the meeting by Treasurer 
Johnson. After discussion, during which the assumption was made 



3248 



North 
Pleasant 
Street - 
Circulation 
Plan 

UM/Boston 

Columbia 
Point 



Medical 
School 



Dump 



Alumni 

Field 

Plaque 



3244 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

that the Alumni association would bear the cost for this plaque, 
motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that a 

plaque be placed on the Whitmore Administration 
Building indicating that this site was that of 
the original Alumni Field. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:05 p.m. 



[ 





Robert/ ZT. McCartney, 
Secretary ,l/Board of Trust^/s 




I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

February 12, 1969, 10:30 a.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Emerson, Plimpton. Also, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Provost Tippo; Dean Soutter; Planning 

Officer Littlefield; Messrs. Cosmas, Fenner, 
Davidson and Sullivan of Jackson & Moreland; 
Messrs. Lawrence and Montanaro of Hermet 
Company; Mr. H. Hugill, Director of Physical 
Plant; Messrs. Paradis and Norton of the 
Physical Plant, UM/A; Professors Peters, 
Adrian, Skrinde and Short of the Department 
of Engineering; Miss Coulter. 

Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 10:30 a.m. 

Treasurer Johnson was asked briefly to describe the 
situation at the Amherst campus with reference to the Power Plant 
and the proposed expansion. The report of Jackson & Moreland, 
engineers, made at the request of the Bureau of Building Construction 
was circulated. This study reported on the site selection and plant 
arrangement of a package boiler plant and new coal handling facili- 
ties. The conclusions indicated that, irrespective of selection of 
site location for the expansion, an additional 150,000 lb/hr boiler 
is required in 1971 to meet requirements. 

Treasurer Johnson asked Mr. Hugill, Director of the 
Physical Plant, to initiate discussion and introduce the consultants 
present at the meeting. It was emphasized that the report of 
Jackson & Moreland poses the problems that exist, but does not pre- 
sent a solution. Mr. Hugill advised that members of the UM/A engi- 
neering faculty would also join the meeting later to discuss air 
pollution as related to the operation. 

The historical background of the current problem was 
given. The University is running out of heating capacity in the 
power plant. We are now engaged in attempting to secure better 
capacity. A boiler was ordered to expand the capacity and delivery 
is expected next fall. Satisfactory bids have been received for the 
boiler, but the BBC has raised the question whether it is still the 
intention to burn coal. He said they are reluctant to award the bid 
for a coal burning boiler. The matter has become critical. The 
question is how to meet all heating requirements in the event of 
severe weather. Conversion to oil was considered. This would entail 
renovations of the old plant and substantial conversion costs. The 
BBC wished to examine the entire problem. Because of the extent of 
the conversion it became advisable to study whether the major plant 
should be removed from the campus and rebuilt at the Tillson farm 
area. A salutary effect of removal from the campus would be 



3245 



Power 
Plant 

Expansion 



3246 



COMMITTEE 




UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

eliminating contamination and air pollution as well as delivery 
truck traffic from the campus. Mr. Davidson of Jackson & More land 
and members of his staff were introduced to the meeting. Mr. David- 
son touched highlights of his firm's study report. 

Included in the highlights: 

Growth of the University has resulted in the 
need for expansion of the boiler plant; how- 
ever, due to allocation of land east of the 
existing plant for the new Campus Center 
Garage, the coal handling facilities will be 
required to relocate. The land west of the 
existing plant has also been reserved for 
other purposes. Consideration was extended 
to putting the coal handling facilities under- 
ground; but with the cost estimated at more 
than $1 million, consideration is now given 
to whether other fuels might be used. 

The space and fuel and aesthetic appearance 
of the campus received consideration and led 
to investigation of the possibility of re- 
locating the plant at a new site at the edge 
of campus. As a result Jackson & More land 
made the comprehensive boiler plant study 
which includes: 

(1) evaluation of expansion at existing site 

(2) new site at Tillson Farm area 

(3) coal, oil and gas - as sources of fuel. 

Mr. Davidson said many people were consulted during the 
course of the study, including University representatives, State 
air pollution officials, representatives of fuel suppliers, State 
fuel purchasing officials, and members of the BBC. Manpower require 
ments for both coal and oil plants were developed. The conclusions, 
and supporting detail, are delineated in Document T69-047. Recommen 
dations for expansion of the boiler plant were not made, since they 
may be dependent upon aesthetics and campus development, rather than 
present economic considerations. 

President Lederle questioned why this matter arose, point- 
ing out that four or five years ago a study had been made of coal 
versus oil resulting in a decision to use coal. The Treasurer 
stated the decision made was a correct one for that time, but the 
economics of the matter have shifted and re-examination is now con- 
sidered appropriate. 

Mr. Davidson outlined the scope of the study and the 
analyses made. He said costs were projected over a 30-year period. 
Considerations included general boiler plant, supporting facility 
expansion, fuel selection and requirements, air pollution control 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

especially as related to the addition of the new library in 1971. 
The resultant conclusions were summarized: 



(cost differences) 

FUEL EXISTING SITE 



2.57oS Oil 

1.07.S Oil 

2.57.S Coal 

1.07.S Coal 



Base 

$2,707,000 
$4,150,210 
$5,890,330 



TILLSON SITE 

$1,557,855 
$4,001,633 
$3,794,089 
$5,772,146 



3247 



Mr. Davidson pointed out that the most economical choice 
is the base scheme, which utilizes 2.5 percent sulphur fuel oil, 
burned at the existing plant and its extensions. Gas, desirable be- 
cause of the minimum air pollution effect, is currently limited in 
supply in the area and uneconomical for University requirements. No 
provisions for escalation are included in the forecasts (see page I- 
2 of summary, Document T69-047) . 

Capital outlay of installing a new oil-fired boiler at the 
existing site (including storage facilities and stack) was estimated 
at $2,500,900. 

Discussion was held on the potential sulphur dioxide air 
pollution problem as it related to the new library, in the event of 
boiler plant expansion at the existing site. It was also noted, in 
the event the Tillson site were selected, that this problem still 
would require attention during the phase-out period at the present 
site. Mr. Cosmas , Jackson & Moreland consultant, explained the 
pollution aspect of the sulphur dioxide in stack effluent. The 
effects of sulphur oxides pollution on health and the range of con- 
centrations and exposure times were reviewed. Because of the proxi- 
mity of the new library (540') a stack of 350' would be essential 
to carry the effluent. 

Mr. Lawrence, inventor of the Hermet Esthet stack, des- 
cribed his proposal for design installation to provide a suitable 
plume action, and minimum air pollution without condensate. Render- 
ings of his stack design were displayed. 

Further discussion on pollution was postponed until the 
luncheon meeting at which time experienced members of the University 
engineering staff were to join the meeting. 

Messrs. Norton and Paradis of the UM-Amherst campus 
physical plant department, by use of slides, brought out salient 
points in the survey and resultant summary. These stressed the need 
for added boiler capacity; the dangers of pollution as related to th« 
new library and the fuel storage problem. They stated the reason 
for the Jackson & Moreland Report was to supply conclusions (not 
recommendations) and the purpose was to resolve: 



3248 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

1. TYPE OF FUEL: 

Gas 

Coal 

Oil 

2. SITE: 



Campus 
Tlllson Farm 

3. BOILER CAPACITY: 
Number 
Size 
When 

Succinct summaries of the Jackson & Moreland conclusions 
were supplied (1-6 attached). 

Discussion was held on future steam demands (see Exhibit 
A). Mr. Paradis described the boiler capacity in the existing 
plant, indicating the necessity for additional capacity (see #12 
attached). He pointed out that the aesthetics of storage would be 
3,000,000 gallons; in above-ground tanks this would be four, 60' 
diameter and 30' high. Below-ground tanks would require 1 concrete 
compartmented bank: 260' X 100' X 15' deep, the equivalent of the 
length of the Whitmore Administration Building and three quarters 
as wide. Treasurer Johnson stated that in order to take care of a 
projected enrollment of 30,000 persons on campus, if the plant re- 
mains at the existing site and converts to oil, a capital investment 
of $4% to $5 million must be considered. Conversion to oil, creates 
the need for additional facilities, including storage. However, a 
significant reduction in operating costs would be brought about. 
The projected and current differentials in fuel, transportation, and 
labor costs of operating the plant on oil rather than coal indicate 
a saving of substantial sums. These figures were set out in the 
documented study. 

Extensive discussion was held on the percent of sulphur 
in the various grades of fuel and related costs. Mr. Hugill stated 
the same kinds of pollution problem will be encountered at Boston 
and Worcester. 

The meeting recessed for luncheon at 12:15 and reconvened 
at 1:00 p.m. Members of the engineering staff who had joined the 
meeting were introduced and discussion was held on the air pollution 
aspects as detailed in the Jackson and Moreland Report. The faculty 
members commended the report for its consideration of this problem 
and the methods used to arrive at the conclusions. Question was 
raised whether, in fact, even with a 350' stack, under some cir- 
cumstances, contamination of the adjacent library building would not 
occur. Dr. Adrien said the kinds and types of pollution would have 
to be taken into account within the library building, i.e., the air 
conditioning system. 



r 



i 



it 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson said consideration must be given to the 
alternative of moving the entire plant to the Tillson Farm, where it 
would have the advantage of proximity to the railroad. This would 
eliminate the 350' stack on campus as well as the air pollution 
problem in the central campus area. The added problem of storage 
tanks and congestion of transportation caused by the average of a 
delivery truck an hour seven days a week must be taken into account. 
The cogent issue, he said, is whether to expand the power plant 
where it is under these conditions with the threat of air pollution 
in spite of every precaution ; or m0 ve to another location. 

In response to the Chairman's inquiry as to whether the 
neighboring Chemistry Towers may also produce pollution, and might 
combine with that of the proposed stack, several opinions were given 
which combined to indicate that the amount, degree and direction of 
flow would make it unlikely they would combine. Mr. Hugill said the 
discharge from the Towers was taken into consideration, and plans 
made in advance to inhibit the possibility of pollution in that area 

Drs . Short and Peters advised that the sulphur content of 
fuel oil is being reduced, due to state regulations; it was also 
said that the change to oil would be advantageous as recent class- 
room tests indicate an amazing amount of ash in the air of the campus 
However, it was pointed out that a materials handling problem might 
be generated in disposing of the sulphur which would be recovered. 
Desulphurization of stack gasses requires substantial space in a 
boiler plant. Advance planning is required and a serious problem 
could be created. The resulting general discussion compared the 
various grades of fuels and their sulphur contents. 

Chairman Haigis, in response to inquiry, was assured that 
there is practically no problem with oil odor. Mr. Cosmas of 
Jackson and Moreland responded to question and said he felt there 
would be no problem with air pollution with a 350' stack. This 
matter will require further definition. 

After general and thorough discussion, Treasurer Johnson 
said new factors have become apparent since the decision four years 
ago to use coal. They are: 

1. operating costs 

2. increase in size 

3. transporting coal in large train loads 

4. transportation rates increasing. 

Motion was then made and seconded and it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the University convert to oil heat. 



3250 



COMMITTEE 



Medical 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Hugill inquired whether the recommendation would in- 
clude moving the plant to the Tillson Farm location and to provide 
storage facilities. He expressed the hope that the designer would 
review the plan and submit an addendum. Mr. Johnson advised that 
the BBC must authorized Jackson and Moreland to do this, which 
would further delay any decision by three or four weeks. In 
response to query, Mr. Hugill said personally he would recommend 
relocation of the plant. 

Treasurer Johnson distributed copies of a file, Document 
T69-049 showing the degree of escalation in the Medical School 
science building project; the Bureau of Building Construction 
Estimate Form (Construction Funds Available), the Federal Grants 
received for the Medical School, also a cost comparison of the Uni- 
versity of Connecticut Medical School with the University of Massa- 
chusetts, a copy of the amended wording of the Medical School appro- 
priation. 

Dean Soutter stated that the cost comparison with the Uni- 
versity of Connecticut was not valid, since their facilities were 
constructed within a period of lower escalation. Instead, he sug- 
gested comparison with Mt. Sinai Medical School constructed in a 
period of escalation similar to that of the University of Massa- 
chusetts. The President suggested that such a comparison be secured 

Dean Soutter reported on his recent trip to Washington. 
This was to determine whether the Federal Government would partici- 
pate in shared funding for escalation. The federal authorities 
agreed to do so, if funds are available. The maximum would be 
approximately $14,600,000 figured on former basis. The Dean pointed 
out that the actual funds contributed by the state were spread over 
four fiscal years - 1970, 1971, 1972, and 1973. 



The Dean reported on a recent article in a Boston newspape:: 
quoting medical deans of various private schools as stating that the 
private medical schools could do the job that the state medical 
school was created to do and at less cost. Treasurer Johnson stated 
the problem is how to move this program without further delay. 
Governor Sargent has expressed the desire to examine the whole pro- 
gram again. No additional funds have been provided in the 1970 
operating budget, and the matter is now left with the Legislature to 
act. 

After further discussion, the matter was left that a press 
release from the President and Dean Soutter would be prepared for 
discussion at the next Executive Committee meeting on February 14. 



The meeting adjourned at 2 





t J. McCartr 
Board of 



stees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

February 14, 1969, 12:30 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT : Vice Chairman Healey; President Lederle, 
Trustees Lyons, Pumphret, Troy; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Dean Soutter, Dean Redfern; Assistant 

Dean Gugin; Mr. John Stockwell; Miss 

Coulter. 

Chairman Healey convened the meeting at 12:30 p.m. He 
asked President Lederle to comment on the campus situation. 

President Lederle advised that a group of students (about 
25) on Monday, February 10, presented demands that there be selec- 
tive morality in the authorizing of recruiting by private companies 
on campus. This group had brought a demand to the Dean of Students 
that a public debate be held with Dow Chemical recruiter before any 
interviews were held. President Lederle said Dow advised they had 
done this before and would be glad to comply. However, the near- 
blizzard that day brought about re-scheduling of recruiting appoint- 
ments and postponement of the debate. 

The President stated that an open campus has been the rule 
at the University of Massachusetts. This rule has been endorsed by 
the student and faculty senates and approved by the Board of 
Trustees. Although he expressed his willingness to discuss issues 
of policy with the students, the demand of the group offered no 
opportunity for discussion. The protesters indicated their demand 
was not negotiable. They rejected the recruiting policy adopted by 
a majority of faculty and students. By sitting in the Administra- 
tion Building in order to enforce their demand the group repudiated 
the normal channels for change in the institution. 

The actual demonstration beganabout 11:30 a.m., February 
13, when a group of students marched from the Student Union to the 
Administration Building, where they immediately staged a sit-in. 
The group called themselves the Committee to End Military Industrial 
Recruitment. During the afternoon emphasis shifted from the Dow 
recruitment office to the Placement Office on the second floor, 
where the demonstrators stated the focus was to stop all University 
recruiting. The Dean of Students spoke to the group in the Place- 
ment Office at 1:00 p.m. He distributed copies of the Faculty 
Senate Picketing Code and advised the group that they were in 
technical violation of the code. 

At 5:00 p.m., the offical closing time for the building, 
Dean Field attempted to dissuade the group from remaining; stating 
that this is not the appropriate way to bring about change. He 
warned them of the consequences. The President held a meeting at 
5:15 p.m., during which discussion was held with top faculty, stu- 
dent and staff leadership. 



3251 



Campus 
Demonstration 



3252 



COMMITTEE 



Medical 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

At 6:30 p.m. the demonstrators were informed the assistance 
of the State Police would be sought to ensure security of the build- 
ing. 

President Lederle pointed out that on Wednesday, the 
Student Senate had voted approval of the University policy of open 
recruitment. 

At 11:30 p.m. the students were again warned, being told 
the police were on campus, preparing to enter the building. Short- 
ly thereafter 33 students were removed by a State Police detail. 

The President said that from the outset the group 
repudiated the concept of an open campus and indicated that their 
demand was non-negotiable. Prior to their removal, they were 
asked whether -- if the University police were used -- (of which 
there were only five or six) they would go with them. They stated 
they would not. 

Discussion was held on University codes and procedures 
and their application to this and similar situations. It was 
noted that there is not an established Graduate Student procedure. 

Trustee Lyons expressed his complete eonf idenceand ad- 
miration for the way the administration handled the situation. 
"This is not just good luck," he said, "but good management". 

There was unanimous support of the President for taking a 
firm stand. 

Discussion was held on disciplinary practices and their 
application. Trustee Lyons commended President Lederle for his 
statement in the press on February 13. 

Treasurer Johnson supplied further details about the 
demonstration. He mentioned the presence of four chaplains and a 
member of the medical staff. Responsible members of the student 
body also mingled with the group, talked with them and attempted to 
dissuade them from remaining in the building after 5:00 p.m. 

The Executive Committee offered a resolution of full 
support of the President in the action taken to remove students 
from their illegal sit-in at Whitmore Administration Building, in 
defiance of the University's Picketing Code. 

The meeting then proceeded to discussion of the Medical 
School. The recent newspaper article quoting Deans of the private 
medical schools as recommending extension of their facilities 
rather than establishment of a state medical school was discussed. 
Dean Soutter reported on the result of his conversations with the 
Deans who were quoted. The Dean of the University of Vermont 
repudiates much of which he was alleged to have said and may issue 
a statement affirming his view that the University should have a 
medical school. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey said that so far as the Medical School is 
concerned, nothing has changed as to the need; only the cost. 

It was decided to prepare a Progress Report, step-by-step, 
to submit to the Governor and others, to indicate that there have 
been no undue delays and that progress has been made exactly in 
accord with the average timetable for establishing a medical school. 
The only unusual development has been the cost escalation factor, 
which has also hit every other building project in these times. 

Dean Soutter advised the engineers and architects have 
stopped work and that Campbell and Aldrich will stop on March 1. He 
stated that $2 million has been lost in escalation due to the delay 
since mid-December. 

Chairman Healey discussed plans for informing the public 
and the legislature of the current situation on the Medical School 
at the time of the meeting of the Full Board of Trustees in Amherst 
on February 21. 

Treasurer Johnson reviewed budgetary matters related to 
the medical school. He said that, as a result of new wording intro- 
duced into the deficiency capital outlay budget previously filed with 
the Legislature, the University would be able to proceed with the 
design of all facilities, irrespective of the cost of the project. 
In the meantime, the Governor's operating budget message notes that 
the Governor plans to review the whole situation. The Treasurer 
has discussed the University's position with Commissioner Shepard 
on several occasions and feels the matter is now subject to action 
by the Legislature. 



Chairman Healey left the meeting at 2:00 p.m. 
Troy was appointed Chairman pro tern. 



Trustee 



Acting Chairman Troy held the consensus to be that, as 
soon as possible after Friday's meeting of the full Board, a meeting 
would be arranged with the Governor and members of the Legislature 
to resolve medical school problems. 

Dean Redfern distributed copies of a memorandum of 
Critical Deficiency Items for the University of Massachusetts in 
Special Capital Outlay and H.4606 and discussion was held. The Dean 
said it was unlikely the Ways and Means Committee would be able to 
report out the special capital outlay bill as applied to the medical 
school before February 24. 

President Lederle drew attention to the memorandum which 
had been supplied in advance of the meeting, enclosing a copy of a 
proposed agreement between UM/A and Local 1776 and Council 41 of the 
American Federation of State, Court and Muncipal Employees. He said 
a lot of careful thought had been put into this agreement. Both 



3253 



Medical 
School - 
Budget 



Collective 
Bargaining 



3254 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

management and the bargaining agent believe it to be a good first 
agreement. He asked for suggestions and concurrence, prior to 
submitting the agreement to the Commonwealth Department of Personnel 
and Standardization. He noted that, if approved, it will then be 
considered by the union membership; and, if ratified, would be 
signed and become effective. 

After further discussion and comment, it was agreed the 
President is authorized to proceed, in accord with vote of the 
Board at a meeting held November 21, 1966. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:39 p.m. 





t J. McCartney, 
Board of Ttl 



ees 



I 



L 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

February 21, 1969, 11:30 a.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy; President Lederle; Trustees 
Haigis, Maginnis, Rowland; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Provost Tippo, Professor James K. 

Kindahl, Professor Vernon L. Smith; 

Miss Coulter. 

Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 11:30 a.m. and in- 
vited Professor Kindahl of the Department of Economics to address 
the committee. 

Professor Kindahl said the Department of Economics is a 
developing one; attempting to grow both in size and quality. In 
order for the department to expand and develop, it is necessary to 
have a complement of people who are knowledgeable in the center core 
of economics. The greatest problem is to get a sufficient nucleus 
of first-class economists so that they will attract other good 
economists . 

Professor Kindahl then described the qualifications of a 
possible candidate of this stature for the department. A detailed 
biography was distributed to the members of the committee. Messrs 
Kindahl and V. Smith expressed the unanimous enthusiasm of the de- 
partment for the quality of the work of the candidate. It was 
indicated that the addition of such a man to the staff would con- 
tribute to the University's national stature. 

Discussion was held on the salary level. Provost Tippo 
pointed out that an overscale appointment would be required in 
order to meet the salary requirements of this candidate. He asked 
for comment. 

Professor Smith stated the salary is within the present 
day range for high quality people in top 'grade institutions. He 
noted that in lesser universities salaries are even greater. The 
candidate has National Science Foundation research and other grants 
He has also expressed his interest in teaching at the undergraduate 
level. 

In response to question, Provost Tippo said there are 

11 positions provided for in the 1% statutory salary ceiling 

exemptions. Eight of these are filled; two are set aside for 
future need. 

Trustee Rowland asked for Provost Tippo 's opinion on the 
candidate and he endorsed the man without reservation. 



o«OD 



Department of 

Economics 

Candidate 



3256 



COMMITTEE 



Forest Service 
Research Unit 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



After further discussion, motion was made, seconded, and 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees to 

proceed with negotiations for an overscale 
appointment in Economics with the candidate 
whose biographical data is herewith attached, 
(file in Office of the Secretary) 

The members of the Department of Economics then left the 



meeting. 

The Dean of the College of Agriculture and Professor 
Arnold Rhodes joined the meeting. They submitted a proposal to 
establish a Forest Service Research Unit at Amherst. The objective 
would be to undertake joint programs of research and graduate level 
education in cooperation with the Department of Forestry and Wild- 
life Management, Landscape Architecture, Agricultural Economics and, 
subsequently, with other related departments such as Botany. 

In general terms, investigations will be concerned with 
the role of forests, parks, greenbelts, and other aggregations of 
trees and related vegetation in an urban-suburban environment plus 
the adjacent more rural lands that are tributary to and serve the 
urban complex. The primary objective would be to study the inter- 
actions between these forested or otherwise tree-associated open- 
space areas and the needs of and problems created by the cities and 
their expansion into the bordering countryside. 

A detailed memorandum setting forth the scope of the 
proposal was supplied to the members of the committee (Document 
T69-048) . The proposed unit would consist of six to eight research 
scientists and a supporting staff of eight to ten technical, 
clerical and administrative personnel. The annual budget would be 
approximately $300 - $350,000, which would be provided by the U.S. 
Forest Service. Attaining this level would depend upon Congression- 
al appropriation over several years. Objectives include a small 
research laboratory, similar to that about to be constructed at the 
University of New Hampshire at a cost of something over $1 million. 

Dean Spielman stressed that the Forest Service desires to 
establish its base at the University of Massachusetts partly because 
of location, but also because of the level of professional competence 
and mutuality of interest to be found here. He said this is an 
opportunity of major significance, and urged favorable consideration 
of the proposal, so that the Forest Service may then seek funds from 
Congress. 

The Committee agreed in principle that the College of 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



3257 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Agriculture should continue discussions looking toward a more 
concrete recommendation in the future. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:20 p.m. 





Robert/a. McCartney 
Secretary(£/Board of Trustees 7 / 




3258 



COMMITTEE 



Resignation, 
Dean, College 
of Arts and 
Sciences 



Acting Dean, 
College of 
Arts and 
Sciences - 
Seymour 
Shapiro 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

March 12, 1969, 12:30 p.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy; Trustees Boyden, Haigis, 
Lambson, Maginnis, Plimpton; Treasurer 
Johnson. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Provost Tippo; Miss Coulter. 

Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 12:30 p.m. and in- 
vited Provost Tippo to comment on the recent resignation of the 
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, and the resultant need for 
appointment of an Acting Dean. 

The Provost noted this is a very large college. He said 
wide consultation was held with the faculty and student groups on 
campus in order to secure suggestions for candidates for Acting 
Dean. A list of 15-20 names, the result of these conferences, was 
ultimately reduced to four in contention. These names were then 
considered by the aforementioned widely representative groups. The 
outcome was the recommendation that Dr. Seymour Shapiro be con- 
sidered for this Acting Deanship. Dr. Shapiro is Head of the Botany 
Department. After further consideration and discussion, motion was 
made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
appointment of Professor Seymour Shapiro 
as Acting Dean of the College of Arts 
and Sciences. 

In response to question, Provost Tippo said there would 
be no change in salary involved in the appointment, but payment of 
two months' salary added to compensate for functioning during the 
summer. It was noted that the President will appoint a committee 
to proceed with the nationwide search for a permanent Dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

Chairman Troy commented that the Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy soon must take a good hard look at the College 
of Arts and Sciences, with a view to determining whether, in fact, 
the job of Dean is not an impossible job in the first place, and 
the College may require division into Humanities, Social Sciences, 
and Natural Sciences, for example. Such a basic reformation would 
entail a dean over each division. 

Discussion was then held on the current situation in the 
History Department. 

Provost Tippo reviewed a report made by outside 
consultants some months ago, incorporating recommendations and 



t 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

suggestions for this 45-50 member department. Trustee Plimpton 
reported a conversation held with a member of this department at 
his office. After further comment and general discussion, the 
Provost expressed his appreciation for the advice and suggestions 
proferred and the meeting advanced to consideration of Personnel 
Actions which were circulated in advance of the meeting. 

The Provost reported that the overscale appointment of 
the candidate for the Department of Economics, considered at the 
previous meeting of the committee, had declined appointment. He 
drew attention to the appointment of Professor William Darity as 
Head of the Department of Public Health, and to Lewis Hanke 
(History) and Hans Speier (Sociology and Government) . 

Provost Tippo circulated copies of books authored by 
Professor Ellsworth Barnard who will join the English Department in 
September, and has expressed special interest in teaching freshmen. 
Chairman Troy commented enthusiastically about Professor Barnard's 
capabilities . 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:55 p.m. 




Robert/?. McCartney 
Secretary, (^Board of Truste 



3259 



Department of 
History 



Appointments 



3260 



COMMITTEE 



Tenure 
Recommenda- 
tions 
UM/ Amherst 



Tenure 
Recommenda- 
tions 
UM/Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
April 17, 1969, 11:00 a.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Troy, President Lederle; Trustees 
Boyden, Haigis, Maginnis, Rowland; 
Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Associate Provost Allen; 
Chancellor Broderick, Acting Dean Gagnon, 
Professors Ulin, Potash, Silver, Fliess, 
Booth, Mrs. Burn, Messrs. Gray and McLemore; 
Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 11:00 a.m. and in- 
vited Provost Tippo to discuss the Tenure Recommendations for the 
University at Amherst. 

The Provost referred to the listing of persons recommended 
for tenure, copy of which had been supplied to the members of the 
committee in advance of the meeting. He noted that all had served 
as members of the faculty for six years with the exception of two 
full professors who had had tenure at their previous institutions. 
He drew attention to one deletion, as noted on attached Document 
T69-046. In response to question from the Chairman, he advised 
that personnel at Waltham and Wareham were evaluated in this same 
mannter. 



After further discussion, motion was made, seconded, and 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
tenure recommendations as set forth in 
Document T69-046 for the University at 
Amherst be approved. 

The Chairman then invited Chancellor Broderick to discuss 
the tenure recommendations for the Boston campus in accord with the 
listing supplied to the committee in advance of the meeting 
(T69-053) . Chancellor Broderick drew attention to the fact that a 
few recommendations were slightly in anticipation of the date on 
which tenure recommendations usually were made. This was felt 
advisable in order to indicate intent to the persons affected and 
encourage their continuance on the UM/Boston faculty. After 
general discussion, one nomination for tenure at the level of in- 
structor was withdrawn without prejudice pending consideration of 
other factors. This recommendation will be reserved for later con- 
sideration. One nomination for tenure (for a professor who has 
resigned) was struck, as noted on the attached document. 



After further discussion, motion was made, seconded, and 



it was 



f 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
tenure recommendations as set forth in 
Document T69-053 for the University at 
Boston be approved. 

There was review and general discussion of Board policy 
on granting of tenure. The Provost briefly described the 
established procedures of review and recommendation through the 
appropriate personnel committees and departments, to the Dean. He 
noted that the approval and recommendation of the Dean is essential 
to nomination of a faculty member for tenure. He then described 
a recent case in which a member of the faculty had been recommended 
for tenure, with the exception of the Dean. The Dean, albeit 
realizing the turmoil his decision would make, still felt in all 
conscience he could not sign the tenure recommendation. His 
reason was stated that felt a better man could be secured for 
the position. Provost Tippo noted that it has become almost 
standard practice to raise a storm of protest if tenure is not 
granted, even in cases where it has been unanimously voted not to 
recommend it. 

Provost Tippo then reported on the result of a two-year 
search for the headship for the English department. A candidate 
has now been proposed, who has the unanimous approval of the 
selection committee. He briefly reviewed the scholastic, academic 
and administrative career of the candidate. A thorough check of 
his background substantiated all vitae, but also revealed a situatior 
which is current and in fact is the result of the exercise of 
academic freedom. This is the only circumstance which makes 
further discussion advisable. President Lederle has discussed the 
candidate and the full circumstances with the President of the 
candidate's institution, who endorses his abilities fully. In 
addition, the Provost has spoken with the candidate personally for 
a full exposition of the facts in the matter. As a result, and in 
view of the unanimous endorsement of the selection committee, the 
proposal is presented herewith. After further question and comment, 
motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of the appointment of Joseph Frank to the 
position of Professor of English (with tenure) 
and to the headship of the department. 

Professor Robert Potash, head of the History department, 
joined the meeting and presented a proposal to establish a 
Clarence H. and Helen Haring Chair in History. 

Professor Potash advised the committee that Professor 
Lewis Hanke, the most distinguished Latin American historian in 
the country, would join the faculty. It is proposed that a chair 
in history be created with Professor Hanke as the first incumbent. 
It is further proposed to name the chair after the distinguished 
Harvard professor under whom Hanke and many others worked. The con- 
sent of the family has been obtained. Biographical data on 



326i 



Headship 

English 

Department 



Clarence H. 
and Helen 
Haring Chair 
in History 



326 



> 



COMMITTEE 



Ombudsman 



Director of 
Library 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Haring, a leading Latin American historian, was submitted. 
After further discussion and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that a 
CLARENCE H. AND HELEN HARING CHAIR IN HISTORY 
be established; also, that Professor Lewis 
Hanke be approved as the first incumbent. 

Professor Potash was invited to comment on the current 
situation in the History department. He expressed the opinion that 
matters were quieting down. The Provost stated a report would be 
prepared within a month. 

Professor I. Silver, chairman of the Ad Hoc Committee on 
the Ombudsman, joined the meeting. He stated the Ombudsman, which 
is further described in Senate Document 69-023 supplied in advance 
of the meeting. He stated the Ombudsman should be a person of un- 
questioned integrity, approved by the President and ratified by the 
Board of Trustees. Hopefully, he will be a person who will under- 
stand the political consequences of actions and will not get in- 
volved in matters such as, for example, the Strom Thurmond affair; 
but only in matters such as those set forth in the document. The 
question of access to and availability of all University files has 
been a matter of some concern in the preliminary discussions. In 
response to question, Professor Silver said this man would have no 
decision-making power; he uses due process. The Ombudsman would 
report to the Board of Trustees at the end of the year on the state 
of the campus. With reference to staff, based on experience of 
other schools, it is probable that a professor with released time 
and a secretary would be adequate. The jurisdiction is broad as 
there are a tremendous number of nagging kinds of complaints. Pro- 
fessor Silver then left the meeting. 

There was general discussion during which Professor Ulin, 
faculty representative, was invited to comment. He stated that the 
faculty had indicated by its vote that it favors an Ombudsman of 
some sort. He noted that not everyone went along with all items 
included in the proposal, but it is negotiable and the document was 
voted by the Faculty Senate. He said the program is entirely de- 
pendent upon selection of the proper man for the position. After 
further discussion and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of the proposal to establish a 
University Ombudsman in principle; details 
to be worked out by the President. 
(Document T69-060) 

Provost Tippo reviewed the personnel situation at the 
Library and reported on the results of a recent study. Interviews 
were held with the Library staff which resulted in a consolidated 
report. The majority vote was that the Acting Director be named 
Director of Libraries. Although this man does not have a library 
background or library degree, he has been the one most concerned 



t 



1 



COMMITTEE 



] 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

with the planning of the new Library. During his administration, 
the acquisition program has been accelerated, fundamental changes 
made in the personnel policies giving librarians professional 
status, as well as other advances. The matter was left that this 
recommendation will be included with the list of personnel actions 
submitted for action at the next meeting of the Board. 

The meeting recessed for luncheon at 12:45 p.m. and re- 
convened at 1:30 p.m. 

Dr. Barbara Burn, Director of International Programs, 
joined the meeting and reported on Criteria and Procedures for the 
Establishment of Study Abroad Programs. (See Document T69-055) 
Under "Criteria" she stated the program will advance the interests 
of the University, will strengthen curricular offerings of both 
campuses and afford faculty opportunity to extend their pro- 
fessional contacts. In addition, the program offers students 
opportunities for study abroad not otherwise available to them. 

Dr. Burn pointed out that proposals for new study-abroad 
programs require sufficient resources in order to assure success. 
She set out a series of conditions which should be met. 

Trustee Rowland stated that the Office of International 
Programs should be for the whole University and not just for the 
Amherst campus. She noted that this principle is in accord with 
the intent expressed at the time decision was made to secure an ex- 
pert to review all programs. The President agreed this is the kind 
of thing the Board at this stage of history would want established 
on a pan-University basis. Any policy the Board adopts should 
apply to both the Amherst and Boston campuses, he said. 

In order to afford Chancellor Broderick and his staff 
opportunity to review and comment on the document which they had 
not previously seen, the matter was left that further action would 
be taken at a future meeting of the Board. 

Dr. Burn next discussed the Freiburg Program (Document 
T69-056) . She recommended that this program be continued, basing 
this recommendation on a variety of factors, including her personal 
discussion with the University of Freiburg officials and members of 
our own staff in Freiburg. She pointed out that the program is in 
its third year and its reputation is just now becoming established 
in the United States and Germany, having weathered the initial 
problems common to study-abroad programs. Increased financial 
support is recommended and fully explained in the document. The 
budget as submitted was considered realistic, but can be reduced 
by the elimination of the item proposed for undergraduate scholar- 
ships ($5,000). Undergraduates are eligible for financial aid for 
study abroad on the same basis as students studying in Amherst. 
Dr. Burn proferred several suggestions for fund raising to aid the 
program, including the prospect of making it a joint project with 
the State University of New York at Buffalo. She recommended that 
the program should be approved for a minimum of three years rather 



326: 



Policy on 

Foreign 

Programs 



Freiburg 
Program 



3264 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

than on a year-to-year basis. Limited approval hampers development 
of the program since long-range planning becomes impossible. 

Dr. Burn stated the name of the center in Freiburg should 
not be changed (as recommended in the Report of 1968) since the 
name Atlantic Studies Center has become known and should be kept 
in the interest of continuity. However, she recommended that the 
name of the program be changed to the Freiburg Program of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts in the interest of eliminating ambiguities 
and stimulating recruitment. 

A series of recommendations were considered for future 
development of the program (pages 2,3,4). Professor Peter Fliess, 
chairman of the Freiburg Committee, endorsed Dr. Burn's report and 
recommendations. He commented that the program exposes students to 
the kind of an education it is hard to secure in this country. 

There are 17 students enrolled in this program at present. 
Twenty-nine have signed up for next year. Thirty percent of this 
number are from other campuses in response to a vigorous advertising 
program. 

The Freiburg people would like to see the program develop 

into a broad exchange. This can only be done if the program is 

given approval for at least a three-year period with added 
financial support. 

In response to President Lederle's comment that it 
appeared a little harder for Freiburg to supply exchange than it 
did for the University at Amherst, Professor Fliess felt there 
should be no great problem on an appropriate level. 

The problem of continuity of leadership and interest is 
a difficult one, President Lederle noted. Dr. Burn felt this could 
be accomplished with the joint effort of the committee and herself. 

Chairman Troy referred to the considered partnership 
with another school and said he felt it would change the concept 
of the program. Professor Fliess pointed out the advantage in 
added funds and numbers of students. The program is envisioned as 
25-35 students on a ratio of 2/3 graduate students, 1/3 under- 
graduates. 

Chairman Troy reviewed the beginnings of the program and 
alumni involvement. The hard work put into this program and pride 
in its success explain the strength of feeling and reluctance to 
join at this stage with another university. Trustee Maginnis con- 
curred in the statement. 



After thorough discussion, motion was made, seconded and 



it was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Freiburg program of the University be 
approved on a three-year basis. 

A summary of the proposal for a field program in 
European Studies in Anthropology, Document T69-057, was presented. 
Dr. Burn said it is hoped there will be more interest in a number of 
departments in the program. Anthropology has expressed such an 
interest. Freiburg is receptive. An integral part of the program 
is field research. This would contribute both to the anthropology 
department and to the Freiburg program by broadening the association 
of each. The proposal is supported by the Freiburg Committee and 
the Office of International Programs. 

It is proposed that the anthropology professor, in 
addition to teaching a course in anthropology as part of the regular 
offerings of Freiburg University, will also teach a special seminar 
for graduate and selected undergraduate students. In the two 
months between semester period and at the end of Freiburg's spring 
term, he will direct field projects in selected communities. Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts students and interested Freiburg University 
students will participate. Details are set forth in the attached 
document. 

After consideration and discussion, there was agreement in 
principle on the summer session as part of the report. 

Dr. Burn and Professor Fliess then left the meeting. 

Professor David Booth, Mr. Vernon Gray and Mr. Leslie 
McLemore joined the meeting and presented a proposal to establish 
a COOPERATIVE BLACK STUDENT PROGRAM (Document T69-058) . 

Professor Booth advised that the proposal has been re- 
viewed and has received the approval of President Lederle, the Dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Dean of Admissions, the 
Associate Provost and others. It has met with enthusiasm at several 
institutions located in the South. 

The program would bring as many as 15 black students to 
the University from negro colleges in the South to pursue one year 
of studies in Government at UM/ Amherst. These students would come 
for their third year and would return to their home institutions to 
share the benefits derived from their experience in their senior 
year. 

The objectives of the program are to provide opportunity 
to obtain more concentrated study in political science which is not 
available in their home institutions. It is also hoped to increase 
the likelihood of their undertaking graduate studies in this dis- 
cipline. 



3265 



Anthropology 
Field Program 
in European 
Studies 



Cooperative 
Black Student 
Program 



3266 



COMMITTEE 



COPE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Among other advantages, the program would have the effect 
of a leavening Influence on the UM student body through the addition 
of a group of talented black undergraduates. 

It is proposed that the program be administered by the 
Department of Government through a faculty advisor and faculty- 
student committee. The plans include establishment of a group of 
interested undergraduate government majors to implement a "buddy- 
system," so that program participants will be aided individually in 
their adjustment to the University. 

Professor Booth drew attention to the budget submitted 
with the proposal. It is anticipated that the participants will 
contribute the equivalent of tuition they would pay at their home 
institution and, hopefully, would receive a tuition fee waiver at 
the University. Discussion was held on the proposed budget 
(Document T69-058) . . - 

President Lederle said he believes very strongly in this 
program and for this group of students (15), the tuition should be 
waived. He noted that these students must go through the established 



"needs" factors, in order to be considered for this benefit, 



The 



maximum amount the University would be required to waive for 15 
students would be $9,000. 

Mr. Gray stressed that this is not a remedial program, 
nor a program for disadvantaged. These students are already in 
college, and it is expected they will do as well as any other stu- 
dent. In fact, hopefully, they will become potential candidates 
for graduate programs. 

Professor Booth stated that the initiation of the program 
is contingent on getting money from outside sources. Indication of 
interest from the University will facilitate this process. 

The proponents of the proposal left the meeting. 

After discussion and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
Proposal to Establish a Cooperative Black Stu- 
dent Program be approved, with every effort 
made to give as much assistance as the Uni- 
versity is able to extend without prejudicing 
other programs. 

Chancellor Broderick submitted a proposal, approved by the 
Faculty Senate of UM/Boston, to give shelter to COPE for one year. 
This is a search group, funded with Federal money in the amount of 
$84,000 to find within the school system and surrounding area 
people who normally would not be considering college and vice versa. 
The group was previously established at Northeastern University. 



r 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chancellor said the head of the group and his staff 
become employees of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the event 
they are accepted in this arrangement. The program would be 
similar to our sponsorship of UPWARD BOUND. 



Discussion was held. Motion was made, seconded, and it 



was 



VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of an agreement with the Federal 
Government to sponsor COPE. 

Chancellor Broderick circulated an editorial from the 
Nantucket newspaper with reference to a series of discussions on 
the possibility of opening a summer school on Nantucket, under the 
auspices of the Boston campus. The school would offer courses in 
the arts, music, history and marine biology. Seminars would be 
arranged for undergraduates from the University and summer working 
students or others, including teachers. It is proposed to hold the 
courses in the town, and not Quaise, where the University holds 
other seminars during the summer. 

The Chancellor said that during the course of his day 
long meeting with representatives on Nantucket, that a sum of 
$6,000 was considered for funding the project if the University 
would also match this sum. A total of 75-100 students at the 
collegiate level are envisioned. Courses at the junior-senior 
level, which are now part of the UM/Boston curriculum, are proposed 
School facilities would be supplied. 

During the ensuing discussion, President Lederle ex- 
pressed concern for administrators already worn thin. He said such 
a program could be done quite easily, but questioned whether 
energies should be put on this instead of something else. The 
President said it is a question of priorities. He pointed out that 
the University at Boston has a high responsibility to deal with 
urban problems; problems of the ghetto among others. 

Chairman Troy noted that this program could provide an 
enriching experience and some of the amenities which are lacking 
on the present UM/Boston campus. 

After further comment, the sense of the meeting was that 
the Chancellor should continue investigation of the possibilities 
for such a development. 

Trustee Rowland questioned whether the $6,000 could not 
be spent to better advantage in arranging for additional night 
students taking more courses in the city area. 



3267 



"9 



UM/Boston 
Nantucket 
Summer 
School 



3268 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The matter was left that Chancellor Broderick will con- 
tinue investigation and prepare a report, which will include con- 
sideration of the use of the same sum of augmented night courses. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:00 p.m. 




Robert JV/McCartney 
Secretary, foyard of Trustee? 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
April 22, 1969, 10:00 a.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Lyons, President Lederle; 

Trustees Knowles, Rowland; Secretary 
McCartney, Treasurer Johnson. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Dean Field, Miss Coulter. 
Professor Goddard, Dr. Brubacher. 
Bruce Balboni, Student Senate President, 
Patricia Beharry of the Student Senate, 
Messrs. Henderson and Kinard of the Afro- 
Am group; Cynthia Olken, Vice President 
of the Student Senate; Paul Silverman, 
Outgoing Student Senate President; 
Davi'd Stevens, Jr., Editor of student 
humor magazine. 



Chairman Lyons convened the meeting at 10:20 a.m. and 
welcomed the representatives of the student government present. 
Student Senate President Balboni was invited to discuss the 
aspirations of the new student government officers. 

President Balboni said the student government is moving 
toward more student control and student participation in establish- 
ing academic and social life for students including selection of 
courses. The interest extends also to the dining commons. A Bill 
of Rights for students is part of the plan. This will call for 
more responsibility given to students for a more adult-like role. 
Essentially the students wish to work cooperatively with the ad- 
ministration to provide more responsibility for the students in 
governing their own lives at the University. Re-examination and 
re-evaluation of the circles of power will determine how best to 
implement such a plan. 

In response to question, President Balboni said he tended 
to think the SDS numbers on campus are insignificant and that they 
do not speak for the student body. Some SDS members are members 
of the Student Senate and as such have chosen proper channels. 
President Balboni stated the Student Senate really speaks for the 
student organizations. Most students would turn to the Senate 
rather than SDS. 

Chairman Lyons introduced into discussion, Document 
T69-059: THE ATTITUDES AND OPINIONS OF UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
CONCERNING THE OPEN HOUSE POLICY (1968-69). This is a review of 
the results of the first year experience of open house policies, 
based on approximately 4,000 student questionnaire responses. 



3269 



Student 
Government 



3270 



COMMITTEE 



Open House 
Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was discussion during which it was noted that less 
than ten percent of the students reported themselves inconvenienced 
in study by open house hours in their residence halls. A sub- 
stantial majority of students felt that enforcement of open house 
regulations was adequate and most appeared satisfied with the 
policy of their residence hall. An overwhelming majority regard 
checks on their behavior such as parental permission for those 
under 21 and guest registration in the residence halls, as 
irrelevant and inconvenient. President Balboni said student 
objection to guest registration is largely due to the inconvenience. 
However, it is considered a trivial matter and of small consequence. 

Chairman Lyons noted that a large majority of students 
who are aware of violations of open house regulations in their 
residence halls take no constructive action to deal with those 
violoations. He questioned how the regulations could be enforced 
under these circumstances. President Balboni concurred with the 
fact. 

The Dean of Students stated the students want increasing 
rights to establish separate rules for their own social lives which 
have increasingly broader limits. The majority feeling is that, 
having lived under this degree of freedom, the increased freedom 
would work well. Consideration of autonomy extending to the corri- 
dors, for example, is suggested. This would contribute to the pro- 
tection of the rights of the minority to insure desirable surround- 
ings conducive to their need (sleep and study). Dean Field gave 
assurance that students were given opportunity to move to another 
area if they did not find their surroundings amenable to their 
needs. 

Miss Patricia Beharry, President of Patterson House, re- 
viewed the experience of her house with the program for the past 
year. "It has been a most happy experience; the program has worked 
well," she said. She described in detail the procedure of checking 
in and out and stated it is long and involved. Problems which 
arose had arisen also prior to the Open House Program. She stated 
that while safeguards were necessary at the beginning, the need no 
longer exists. Small violations which occur do not really bother 
the students in the dormitory. Those which are troublesome are 
worked out. Breaches of regulations have been dealt with by due 
process and have resulted on occasion in cancellation of open house 
for a week. 

President Lederle noted with approbation the enforcement 
of existing rules by the house governments. This indicates the 
respect with which the house government is held and the degree of 
responsibility it exercises. He stressed that he is not against 
removing rules when their need has been outmoded, but emphatically 
stated that rules should be enforced so long as they are in effect. 
He said the Senate should vigorously pursue proposal for change 
when needed. 



r 



( 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle made reference to the regulations re- 
quiring parental consent. He emphasized the importance of this 
agreement between parent and student to the administration and to 
the Board of Trustees, since it insures that the parent has full 
knowledge of the circumstances under which the student comes to 
the University. 

President Balboni agreed in essence, suggesting that per- 
haps the applicable age should be reduced from 21 to 18. Chairman 
Lyons expressed himself against the "signing in" procedure, but 
also against uninvited guests. Miss Beharry and Miss Olken ex- 
plained this was not the same thing. For example, the "Towers" are 
constructed with multiple entrances and it is almost impossible to 
keep uninvited guests out. General discussion was held on all 
facets of this problem, including campus security and protective 
procedures. It was agreed that the House Government and Judidiary 
perform in the light of need. Miss Olken noted that people are 
more likely to enforce rules they set up themselves. 

Dean Field reported that most institutions in New 
England have adopted some program of visitation. The trend is to 
increase the hours. 



Chairman Lyons inquired how well the 
Faculty Senate combined committee worked as a 
felt it had not worked as well as it should, 
advised that the Student Senate President had 
committee during the past year and this was a 
Senate President Balboni stated that the joint 
to the Faculty Senate more than to the Student 
report to the Faculty Senate. He felt reports 
both bodies and stated that all committee repo 
back to a representative body. 



Student Senate- 
channel. Dean Field 
Professor Goddard 
been a member of the 
benefit. Student 
committees are tied 
Senate. Also, they 
should be made to 
rts should be made 



Miss Olken cited the example of the Faculty Senate's 
veto power over the students' vote in relation to their living 
conditions. Faculty, thus, become "in loco parentis." This is 
brought about by the practice of returning the report to the Faculty 
Senate. Provost Tippo stated the faculty is now debating a docu- 
ment on the reorganization of the University. Regarding the 
personal lives of the students, the faculty do not feel they should 
play a role. 

President Lederle posed the question: what are the things 
that are purely student and what are purely faculty? He cited the 
example of the picketing ordinance, except for the provisions pro- 
hibiting picketing outside buildings. The Student Union is a stu- 
dent building; the administration building is not. 

Mr. Balboni responded that the administration is here to 
administer the University for the students. The normal operation 
and functions in the administration building should not be inter- 
fered with, although peaceful demonstration within the building is 
in order. He felt that students occupying a corridor, so long as 



3271 



Parental 
Consent 



3272 



COMMITTEE 



YAHOO 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

they do not block passage, are not in violation. Miss Olken said 
the picketing code is enforced only against students. The student 
judiciary is being made to enforce rules that the students do not 
want, and this is not fair. 

The University is really not owned by the students, or 
just here for the students; it is owned by the Commonwealth, 
Trustee Rowland said. It is here for the people of the Common- 
wealth and everyone in the state has a stake in what goes on here. 
Student Senate President Balboni clarified any misunderstanding by 
stating he did not believe the University should be run by student 
tyranny, but that certain areas were not proper for faculty concern, 
such as the Open House Policy. 

The Provost said the faculty has come to the feeling that 
the students should control their own eating, drinking, sleeping 
and personal affairs. 

Dean Field discussed the application of the Discipline 
Code, stating it was primarily to establish procedural safeguards 
for students. Student-Faculty cooperation will no longer be con- 
cerned with social activities, but primarily with curriculum. 

The Dean of Students apprised the committee of a recom- 
mendation endorsed by the Student Senate and submitted by the 
editor of the University humor-satire magazine that the publication 
be granted permission to use the name YAHOO as the official title. 
Copies of the memorandum describing the request were distributed in 
advance of the meeting. Mr. David Stevens, Jr., Editor, was intro- 
duced to the meeting. 

Mr. Stevens informed the committee that one more issue is 
scheduled for this year. It is expected to be distributed on 
May 1. 

This year the magazine has been issued without a name and 
things have worked out fairly well. A year of responsible work has 
been concluded, and it is now felt the magazine should have a name 
and that the name should by YAHOO. RSO concurred in this decision. 
The Dean of Students supports and endorses the request for petition 
to the Board to reinstitute the old name. In response to Trustee 
Rowland's question as to why no name was given to the magazine last 
year, Mr. Stevens responded that the people in the organization 
felt it would be hard to get the name YAHOO back again if another 
name had been used in the interim. He also agreed that the consti- 
tution drawn up had been satisfactory and that it had been possible 
to work within it. Minor changes irlay be requested for next year, 
mostly procedural. Mr. Stevens wishes to be relieved of the duties 
of editor next year, but members of the staff are gaining experience 
and it is expected they will be able to carry on. Mr. Stevens said 
the reason the name YAHOO is desired again for the publication is 
because it was a tradition for ten years and had many good qualities 
The damage caused previously can be erased and the publication im- 
proved. The name is singularly appropriate, he said, and referred 
to its origin in Gulliver's Travels. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Paul Silverman, outgoing Student Senate President, 
presented the view that the name is one endorsed by the student 
body and backed by the Student Senate. He held that further dis- 
cussion is irrelevant in view of the fact that it is the student 
campus humor magazine paid for by student funds. Therefore, stu- 
dents should have the right to select the name. He felt the matter 
should never have been a subject for Trustee consideration. 

Provost Tippo encouraged favorable consideration of the 
request. He drew attention to the campus unrest throughout the 
country and felt this to be a very minor matter. Chairman Lyons 
agreed with the rationale, but said it was a matter of alienating 
the Legislature. 

Mr. Silverman, as outgoing President of the Student 
Senate, was invited to review the current status of the student 
community. He remarked that there have been few changes on campus 
during the past year. In the past, the Board of Trustees have 
worked with the Student Senate; but in the future, the Trustees can 
expect to have to institute dialogue with more and more diverse 
groups. He predicted that, gradually, the students will take over 
control of their own personal affairs. The Board of Trustees and 
Administration will have to step aside and the decisions on living 
conditions, sleeping and eating conditions will be made by the 
student body. 

Chairman Lyons questioned whether the student government 
could handle matters of unrest. Mr. Silverman felt that the more 
strength vested in the student government, the less likelihood 
there would be of radical elements controlling the University. He 
said any small group of students can shut down a university, but 
they cannot control it. Student organizations or administration 
cannot deal with this problem on a logical plane because they are 
dealing with a different kind of people. The SDS represents a 
problem no matter who is the enforcer, students or administration. 
"They operate on a moral basis and not on usual standards," 
Silverman said. 

Chairman Lyons asked whether Mr. Silverman felt there was 
an answer, or whether the problem may simply "be lived with." Mr. 
Silverman said there is no answer to revoluntionaries but to give 
as much real power to the student government as possible. "Keep 
the radical minority to its basic limites," he said. "The student 
government has been able to handle the situation in the past." 

The Chairman indicated there would be a great deal of 
agreement with the comments of Mr. Silverman and that his specific 
recommendations were sought. 

Mr. Silverman drew attention to the fact that the dining 
commons for years have been paid for with student fees, yet students 
have only a minor voice in their operation. Students should set the 
policy for these commons, Silverman said. Although students do not 
have the expertise to run the kitchens, etc. they should be the 






Silverman 

Review of 

Student 

Community 



3274 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

people sitting on the boards making operational decisions. He said 
there should be students on the board establishing policy above the 
food service manager and also on housing. He noted that when the 
residence halls lose money, or when damage causes assessment, or 
when the $50 advance deposit is decided upon, the students pay, 
without having had a voice in the decision. 

"There are many areas on campus where students should be 
making decisions about how their lives should be run," Silverman 
added. "The more students realize they can do things, the less 
chance there is of revolution." 

Provost Tippo asked Mr. Silverman to discuss "April 24." 
Mr. Silverman stated that this planned affair was postponed as the 
Senate got lost in its own verbiage. It had been the intention to 
publicize on this day the Student Senate's position that they would 
make their own living rules and not enforce or carry out any others. 
The student judiciaries were said to be in the position of enforc- 
ing rules they did not make. 

Professor Goddard, Chairman of the Faculty Senate Com- 
mittee on Student Affairs, briefly reported on current committee 
activities concerning alcoholic beverages and rules revisions under 
consideration. He advised that the Student Affairs Committee over 
a year ago recommended that the Student Union pursue through proper 
channels the matter of securing a license to serve alcoholic 
beverages in the Student Union. This is being done. Mr. Grinnan, 
Manager of the Campus Center, is working closely with the admini- 
stration and others with a view to getting a license as part of the 
Campus Center and Student Union. Regulations demand that a wall 
must be erected before a license is granted in order to provide for 
posting of the permit. A vote has been passed to study the matter 
further with reference to residence halls. Committees for four or 
five years have considered this proposal and, almost without ex- 
ception, concentrate on the behavior of the consumers rather than 
on alcohol per se. 

Mr. Silverman commended Professor Goddard 's committee and 
stated they had been very helpful. However, he questioned why the 
Faculty Senate committee should be involved in student affairs of 
this type. The students, as persons, should not be in the position 
of feeling ineffective. The Administration and deans should be 
more actively innovative rather than waiting for the students to 
approach them, giving the impression that all changes are forced, 
Silverman said. 

"If the Student Senate were invested with more power, it 
would feel a sense of responsibility and a sense of repugnance at 
acts of violence on campus. As the situation is now, the students 
do not feel this responsibility since they do not make the rules." 

In response to question, as to solution to the problem, 
Mr. Silverman said the system is basically good but needs much 
change. Some students think the entire system is bad, he added. 



r 



K 



! 



3275" 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



As to what can be done to prevent violence and distruption or to 
minimize it, additional police will not achieve the result, he 
said. To many people, a University is guilty of complicity. It 
is this group which is talking a different language. The answer 
is to separate them off. The majority of students are uncommitted 
now; they are "middle ground." The fringe group is mixed in. 
Positive change should be made evident now, so that progress can be 
seen. The Faculty Senate and Trustees should work for change now 
so that the majority (of middle ground moderates) won't shift over. 
Mr. Silverman stated that whereas proposals are tabled, demands are 
met . He cited the example of the library. He said it closes at 
10:00 p.m. and should be kept open for study purposes. It should 
be possible to have dialogue about this and any other matters. 
"Work for change; show that proposals are being met," he suggested. 
He drew attention to the fact that the Student Union, now that it 
has extended its hours, is filled to capacity every night. 

In the event that all of the changes recommended were 
made, Treasurer Johnson asked, what about the minority or radical 
group which would indubitably be pursuing its usual course of 
action regardless of more liberal regulations. 

Mr. Silverman stated that, viewing the situation in terms 
of war, any guerilla needs public sympathy in order to exist. If 
students commit destructive acts at the University, they will meet 
with general repugnance. Without public (i.e. broad student) 
support, radicals could not control this campus, or in fact even 
make inroads . 

Secretary McCartney asked Mr. Silverman for comment on 
the growing public backlash against disorder and violence on the 
campus. He cited repressive legislation which is now going into 
law in California, Colorado and Wisconsin. Chairman Lyons referred 
to a recent article in the Collegian indicating that, at the recent 
student elections, the ballot boxes had been stuffed, necessitating 
voiding the election and conducting another. 

Student Senate President Balboni responded that this was 
the first occurrence of this kind to his knowledge. He described 
how it was possible, due to placement of ballot boxes. The situa- 
tion will not reoccur as adequate precautions will be taken. 



that: 



The Provost summed up the gist of the comments stating 
1. the system be as rational as possible 



2. policies be as fair as possible, so 
that radicals have no ammunition 



The Provost and the President held open discussion on the 
library rule which levies fines on students, but waives fines for 
faculty. The President held this to be inequitable. Senate Presi- 
dent Balboni inquired as to who had set this policy. He said he 
felt the library committee should be a University committee and not 
just a faculty committee; this should also hold true of other 
committees. 



3276- 



COMMITTEE 



Student Views 
on Academic 
Program 



Powers of 
President 
in an 
Emergency 
Situation 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The process of change is slow, but must be accelerated, 
President Lederle said. 

The effect of state laws on any University rule with 
reference to drinking was discussed. Trustee Rowland said the stu- 
dent will have to face responsibility as he does with any other law. 

Chairman Lyons suggested that Professor Goddard's com- 
mittee prepare a report and circulate it for consideration as soon 
as possible. 

Chairman Lyons asked Mr. Balboni and Mr. Silverman to 
spell out their concern about the academic program. Mr. Silverman 
said there are good and bad teachers, yet the students have no 
voice in awards such as, for example, merit increases. He expressed 
the view that the students are in a better position to evaluate a 
teacher's ability in the classroom than anyone, and they should be 
given the opportunity to express this evaluation. Provost Tippo 
agreed that this is done in some schools and departments. Mr. 
Silverman said a teacher's knowledge does the students very little 
good if he cannot project it and help the students to learn. He 
suggested that, under the present system, there is no way to relate 
the students' feelings to the administration and possibly "this 
should be computerized." 

Chairman Lyons quoted a Collegian article with reference 
to "credits" and asked for comment. Dean Field explained the 
standard practice which Mr. Silverman said had the effect of forcing 
students to take courses they felt had no value to them, simply in 
order to conform to regulations. 

The meeting recessed for luncheon at 12:40 p.m. and was 
reconvened at 1:20 p.m. The students left for class. 

President Lederle asked for comment on the powers of the 
President in an emergency situation. He noted that the fundamental 
purpose of the "April 24 Day" was a statement on the part of the 
students that they would not enforce through the student judiciary 
any rule or regulation they had not legislated themselves. 

Discussion was held. 

Trustee Rowland questioned whether the law of the Common- 
wealth provided that the President, as a servant of the Commonwealth 
could legally take action to protect the property of the Common- 
wealth. Treasurer Johnson said the President has statutory powers 
to protect the property of the Commonwealth. However, the exercise 
of these powers might not be appropriate in certain circumstances, 
and they are not all-inclusive. For example, the President can 
suspend, but unless he has the support of the students and faculty, 
he is left in an untenable position. Trustee Rowland suggested that 
a meeting be held with the President and the Student and Faculty 
Senate heads to determine which support they would give. 



327? 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle said his desire is to keep the academic 
community working effectively. He does not believe an answer is 
immediately available; but the public and the Trustees feel it is ar 
affront for students to behave in a rebellious fashion. 

A meeting with the Student Senate and Faculty Senate 
heads to discuss the problem was again recommended by Trustee 
Rowland. The President said a meeting with student representatives, 
such as that held today, is beneficial. 

The importance of affording opportunity for the Trustees 
to meet and talk with the students on occasion, was stressed by 
Trustee Knowles. The beneficial effects o£ personal communication 
were pointed out. 

Messrs. Henderson and Kinard, representatives of the Afro- 
American group of students, joined the meeting and were introduced 
by Dean Field. Mr. Kinard, President of the Afro-American Organi- 
zation, was invited to outline the group's current programs and 
future goals. 

Mr. Kinard said that much has been accomplished, but there 
is room for improvement. He pointed to the 90% retention rate of 
CCEBS students as indicative of the calibre of the student. One of 
the weaknesses in the program is adjustment to the climate of the 
campus. This will be easier next year because new students will 
have the benefit of the expertise gained by the fifst-year students. 
Dean Field said the emphasis had been on the academic program and 
the social problem had not received adequate consideration. 

President Kinard stated that the directional goals of the 
organization were: 

1. to interest more black youth in the educational oppor- 
tunities at UM i ' . 

2. to help the black student adjust to college life, 
which is very different from previous experience 

3. to develop basic attitudes toward themselves as a 
Black Nation, as individuals, and toward the world 
in which they live 

4. to stimulate a black consciousness of mind; an identity 

5. to give the student Afro-American Organization a 
personality reflecting themselves. 

Mr. Kinard commented that black students were not advocat- 
ing that they become isolationists or separationists; on the con- 
trary, that they accept themselves and develop themselves so that 
they may become an equal part of the present society. 



CCEBS 

Afro-American 
Organization 



3278 



COMMITTEE 



Five College 

Black 

Studies 



Funds for 
Program 



Social 
Issues 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Initiation of a Black Studies Program was described and 
discussed. Mr. Henderson said with Mike Thelwell, a fine and 
knowledgeable writer on campus, an opportunity is afforded to 
establish one of the finest programs in the country. The black 
faculty was described as exceptional. They form a group among the 
best in the country. It is hoped to bring in a black art professor 
and history professor to the campus as soon as possible. 

Discussion was held on various facets of the program. 

Mr. Kinard referred to Five Colleges Afro-American con- 
siderations. A phase-in program has been requested. Mr. Kinard 
felt that a Black Studies Department could be a reality at UM by 
the end of next year. It is envisioned that the members of the 
Five College Group will be able to participate in the Black Studies 
Program at the University. A Five College Black Studies Director 
to coordinate the inter-institutional program has been requested. 
Each college, in addition, plans to have its own director. The 
only similar program in the country is in Atlanta; this is a four- 
college program. 

Mr. Kinard noted that black colleges have been more con- 
servative in initiating black studies programs than white colleges. 
He attributed this to their emulation of the white man. 

Unity and diversity, rather than unity and uniformity, Mr, 
Henderson held, require complete restructuring of attitudes. 

The proposed cutback of funds for the program was dis- 
cussed. President Kinard said a petition is being circulated. 
This was signed by ex-Vice President Humphrey during his recent 
visit to the campus. Constructive action is being attempted by the 
group to assist in the matter of offsetting financial deprivation. 
Mr. Kinard has talked with faculty members and with other qualified 
persons, some of whom have volunteered their services for tutoring, 
etc. 

In response to the President's question of what proportion 
have dropped courses, Mr. Kinard stated 20-30 students. The purpose 
of this was to lighten the load, but all plan to graduate with their 
class. The social issues were neglected in the beginning, although 
they are important as well as academics. Black courses will not be 
limited to black students. 

Discussion was held on the lack of funds allocated for 
this program by the Governor. Mr. Kinard asked whether this meant 
that no new students would be accepted next year. President 
Lederle said it is impossible to commit money we do not have, but 
within two or three weeks the plans for the future should be more 
clear. The students already at the University, he said, will con- 
tinue in the program; however, it had been hoped to expand. 



r 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



] 



3279 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"These students have justified our faith in them," the President 
said, "but if funds are not available, it will not be possible 
to expand." He encouraged the students to write to their legis- 
lators in support of the program. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:00 p.m. 




Rob 
Secretar, 




t J. McCartney- 
Board of Trusl 



3280 



COMMITTEE 



Radio 

Astronomy 

Observatory 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
April 23, 1969, 10:30 a.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Emerson, Knowles, 
Pumphret; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney (Troy) . 



Trustee Troy; U of M Planning Officer 
Littlefield, Acting Dean Gagnon, Dean 
of Administration Redfern, UM/B Planning 
Officer O'Brien, Professor Irvine, Dean 
McGuirk, Mr. Norton, Mr. Paradis. Pro- 
fessor Wyman, Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 10:30 a.m. 

Professor Irvine, Chairman of the Astronomy Program, was 
introduced to the meeting and presented a proposal for a site for a 
research project off campus. He reminded the committee of the 
rapid growth in Astronomy in the last three years and the plan to 
create an outstanding department. One of the principal areas of 
growth is in radio astronomy; he cited the lack of local observa- 
tional facilities. A radio observatory that can be built in steps 
is planned; it is hoped to begin this summer. Funds are hoped for 
from NSF. Estimated cost of project is $1 million; initial stage 
is estimated to be $125,000. However, the site is necessary in 
order to secure the federal funds. A 20-acre site near campus to 
facilitate use by faculty and students, but free from radio dis- 
turbance, has been found. It is land owned by the Commonwealth in 
a wild life area south of Quabbin Reservoir (part of Swift River 
Wild Life). Professor Irvine indicated on area maps the exact 
location. The use is compatible with that intended by the Division 
of Fish and Game who have the area. A farmhouse and barn on the 
site would be useful as a laboratory building. Commonwealth 
approval would have to be secured for the land use. This property 
is adjacent to University Orchards. 



Discussion was held and on motion made and seconded, it 



was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
approval be granted to approach the Common- 
wealth for use of the site in the Swift 
River Wild Life sanctuary as outlined on 
area map on file in the Office of the 
Treasurer. 

Treasurer Johnson informed the committee that the State 
Department of Public Health has asked the University to cease open 
burning of refuse on their dunp property. Subsequent conference 
with experts from the Department of Public Health reveals increasing 



3281 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

complexities in solving this disposal problem. Dumping into 
natural ravines is no longer permitted because of the possibility 
of' water pollution; burning in an incinerator is not permitted, nor 
has the newer technique of grinding trash and disposing of residue 
through the power plant been approved as yet. Funds for an in- 
cinerator were requested in capital outlay last year and again 
this year. Question now arises whether incineration will be 
approved. Sanitary land fill has been approved, however, the 
University's available acreage would be completely exhausted within 
a few months. Mr. Norton, Director of the Physical Plant, expanded 
on the report and indicated that an intense search has revealed 
only two possible sites for further sanitary landfill; these are 
gravel banks. 

Trustee Pumphret pointed out that with an enrollment of 
30,000 students at some future date a feasible long-term solution 
should be found. 

Mr. Norton stated that certain types of incineration will 
be approved; others will not. It is planned to proceed along these 
lines under capital appropriation, but the immediate problem is 
sanitary landfill until a permanent solution is decided upon. 

Treasurer Johnson gave a progress report on the land ac- 
quisition program for Worcester. He reviewed the situation on the 
Syrian Church owned property. An offer for the property, desired 
for the U of M Medical School, was made on the basis of three 
appraisals made three years ago. The offer has not been accepted. 
A fourth appraisal has been made on the property. The value of the 
property is not rflear due to restrictions in the deed by which the 
Commonwealth conveyed the property limiting it to church use. 
Further, the State Department of Public Works and the City of 
Worcester have acquired some of the area, reducing the parcel from 
the original six acres. It appears that a provision was included 
also in the deed that, in the event the Commonwealth needed any of 
the property for roads or utilities, it was to be released to them 
without payment for the takings. 

A plan to develop a larger interchange at this critical 
traffic point in the city may require mote of this land. Treasurer 
Johnson will confer with the Department of Public Works to determine 
their plans. 

The master plan included acquisition of additional land 
in the Wigman Hill area for housing of students. One resident has 
offered his property for sale in this area to the University. Two 
appraisals have been made. After discussion and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
Treasurer be authorized to proceed with the 
acquisition of the house and land located at 
383 Plantation Street based on the appraisals 
on file in the Treasurer's Office. 



Dump, 
Report on 



Worcester 

Land 

Acquisition 



3282 



Progress 
Report 
Worcester 
Construction 

COMMITTEE 



Power 
Plant 
Expansion 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Treasurer reported that Mr. Chase of the BBC has given 
the architect for both the medical school and hospital building in- 
structions to proceed without delay with the design of these build- 
ings. The basis on which they are proceeding is preliminary plans 
that were submitted for federal grants and approved under federal 
grants. Completion of working drawings for the medical science 
building is scheduled for November 1. This means review during 
winter and construction to begin next spring. Deadline for the 
hospital plans is March 1, 1970. 

By August, 1969, bulldozers are scheduled to be in the 
ground in Worcester preparing the site. Construction of the power 
plant and utilities will follow. 

President Lederle advised that a great problem to progress 
of "the plans for the Worcester Medical School is the lack of support 
ing funds which would enable Dean Soutter to add professional staff. 
This phase of the program is equal in importance to the physical 
side. 

The Treasurer reviewed the discussion at a previous meet- 
ing with reference to the Power Plant expansion. An exhaustive 
report has been prepared by consultants. The air pollution problem 
is a vital consideration. (See Document T69-061) . The report in- 
dicated a change should be made from coal to oil; our studies are 
convincing that this is the time to change to oil. As a result of 
review and evaluation of the Jackson & Moreland Report and study of 
alternate schemes, it is recommended that: 

1. Oil be used as the primary fuel; all equip- 
ment be designed and provided to permit use 
of natural gas as a secondary fuel. 

2. Construct a new oil/gas boiler plant at 
Tillson Farm using existing plant as stand- 
by for the duration of its useful life. 

Treasurer Johnson said a massive study and analysis in 
depth was made by highly skilled members of our own School of Engi- 
neering staff, the University Master Planning Committee, the Bureau 
of Building Construction, and Messrs. Norton and Paradis of the Uni- 
versity Physical Plant department, as well as Jackson & Moreland, 
consultants. Conference was also held with Northeast Utilities 
people to determine if there were prospects for a power plant in 
Amherst to supply steam. The result of their preliminary study in- 
dicated that to buy steam would cost the University too much. 

Trustee Knowles raised the question of use of atomic 
power. Mr. Norton said this had also been considered, but found 
economically unfeasible. Jackson & Moreland felt it would be some 
time before it would prove economical. There was general dis- 
cussion. After consideration and on motion made and seconded, it 
was 



II 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
in accordance with Scheme II on attached 
Document T69-06I, the University construct 
a new oil-fired boiler plant (with pro- 
vision for use of gas as a secondary fuel) 
along the railroad siding at Tillson Farm, 
using the existing plant (coal-fired) as 
standby for its useful life. 

Mr. Frank O'Brien, UM/B Planning Officer, submitted plans 
for renovations at 100 Arlington Street. The plans provided for a 
new mezzanine to be used for a science library. The purpose of 
this library is to relieve congestion at the main library across 
the street and also afford ready access of books and periodicals to 
the science department. 

Plans for a new electrical board to increase capacity; 
and renovations to offices on the 13th floor were also presented. 
These projects were discussed previously, and were postponed, Mr. 
O'Brien said, from the previous summer. It is expected that bids 
will be in and evaluated within a month. 

Discussion was held on the justification for splitting 
the library. Acting Dean Gagnon stated it gives ready access to 
the science people and while it divides the collection in a sense, 
it also prevents the fractionalization of the collection into 
several departmental sub-collections. He said it will be primarily 
periodicals and generally books will be left with the main 
collection. 

Mr. O'Brien said the library area will be encased in 
glass for both aesthetic and practical financial reasons. It will 
also provide soundproofing. Funds were appropriated last year for 
this work which can be done only during the summer months. 

Trustee Knowles stated the proximity of the library 
seemed adequate and expressed herself not in favor of this 
mezzanine renovation. 

Treasurer Johnson explained this division is in the 
nature of the requirements of science faculties today. He said 
there is a small library in each of the science buildings in 
Amherst and the new Graduate Research Center also has a library. 
The original Heller plan for the building included use of this 
otherwise waste space for a mezzanine. After further discussion 
and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

they approve the plans as submitted for reno- 
vations at 100 Arlington Street as prepared 
by architects Drummey, Rosane and Anderson. 



3288 



Mrs. Knowles was recorded as opposed. 



> 



UM/B 

Science 

Library 



Approval of 
Plans for 
Renovation at 
100 Arlington 
Street 



3284 



COMMITTEE 



Columbia 

Point 

Development 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. O'Brien briefly reviewed developments related to the 
Columbia Point permanent campus. Copies of Document T69-062 
entitled COLUMBIA POINT SITE: MASTER PLAN - ESTIMATED SPACE REQUIRE- 
MENTS were distributed. The document set out floor area and 
vehicular traffic by building... 

Mr. O'Brien reported that the Boston faculty committee 
has produced a master plan that is proceeding through the Senate. 
One of the basic proposals is that the University be organized by 
colleges of about 2,000 undergraduates in size. As this plan de- 
veloped, it has been translated into space expectations, as shown 
on attached document. This cannot be completed until decision is 
made as to what will be taught and how. Modifications must be made 
as the plan develops. 

Mr. O'Brien reviewed the overall development and progress 
of the plans for the Columbia Point site. The space program for 
the first' building will be ready by the end of the summer. 

President Lederle inquired about the academic plan noting 
that the Board must know this before moving further. 

Acting Dean Gagnon said the table indicates the rough 
proportion of need, further detail would be supplied as the plan 
progressed. The present master plan before the Senate estimates 
15,000 students for 1980; 3,000 to be mixed graduate students and 
professional students beyond the bachelor's degree. 

Treasurer Johnson pointed out that certain aspects have to 
be known before the job can be done properly, especially "space 
users." Before the master plan can progress very far these concepts 
must be developed. He cited the example of need for water front or 
playing fields, or similar large areas necessary to certain dis- 
ciplines, should they become part of the program. The schedule to 
date has been: 

1. Attorney Broadhurst drafted the legislation 

2. It was reviewed 

3. The revision will be reconsidered this week 

4. Decision must be made re the $150 million 

required for the first phase. This would 
include 

A. Site acquisition 

B. Total planning and building of 

first unit for 5,000 students. 

Discussion was held on presentation of the need for this appropria- 
tion to the Governor. 

Acting Dean Gagnon asked for clarification on whether the 
UM/B would be expected to take the academic plan for Columbia Point 
to the Trustee Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. He 
noted that the UM/B is now working with Associate Provost Allen on 
the master plan on enrollment. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle said the Board needs to know more about 
the plans and the educational philosophy. The plan must be pre- 
sented as soon as possible to the Trustees. 

Acting Dean Gagnon informed the meeting that a request 
for permission to use $75,000 to construct five new classrooms in 
the Sawyer Building would be submitted. 

The President said that this building is no\t owned by the 
University and renovations had been the subject of previous dis- 
cussion. The legality of such renovations is an issue that must be 
resolved before submitting it to the Board. 

Treasurer Johnson then reported on land taken for highway 
purposes in Ohio. He reviewed the circumstances by which the Uni- 
versity acquired the land as a gift and the subsequent taking of a 
small parcel by the State of Ohio for highway purposes. The vote oi 
the Board authorizing the Treasurer to negotiate with the State of 
Ohio included a clause providing for retention of oil rights. Con- 
siderable public outcry in Ohio about the terms of such takings, 
and retention of rights, has necessitated the deletion of this 
reservation. The lease giving these rights has expired and was not 
renewed. Accordingly, after discussion and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the vote of May 31, 1968 be amended to deed 
the property to the State of Ohio without 
the retention of mineral rights. 

The Designer Selection Board received requests for con- 
sideration from seventy-five distinguished architectural firms to 
design the engineering building on the Amherst campus. After re- 
view, three names were selected by the committee: 

1. Drummey, Rosane & Anderson, Newton 

2. Deeter, Richey & Sipple, Pittsburgh and Boston 

3. Anderson, Beckwith & Haible, Boston 

The Commissioner has not acted yet to make a final 
selection, but each of the firms were on the Trustee list and any 
one of these organizations will provide an outstanding design for 
this additional campus building. (Subsequent to the meeting, Com- 
missioner Dwight named Drummey, Rosane & Anderson.) 

The Treasurer reviewed the status of the proposed 
Athletic, Hockey and Convocation facility at Amherst. This proposal 
has been considered by a series of committees including the Faculty 
Senate Committee on master planning, a student faculty building 
committee, and the student-faculty athletic council to see if it 
would be feasible to support this facility with an increased fee. 
It would then be a self-liquidating project. The project is now 
before the Student Senate which is considering a new fee. The 
question of site is presented today. Dean Warren P. McGuirk joined 
the meeting. 



3285 



Murray D. 
Lincoln 
Land in 
Ohio 



3286 



COMMITTEE 



Athletic, 
Hockey and 
Convocation 
Facility 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean McGuirk submitted a campus map depicting the pro- 
posed facility in the area recommended by the Master Planning 
Committee. Planning Officer Littlefield described the traffic 
pattern developed in this area. After general comment and dis- 
cussion and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the site for the proposed Athletic, Hockey 
and Convocation Facility in Amherst as 
recommended by the Master Planning Committee 
be approved in the location west of Common- 
wealth Avenue in the area of the farm build- 
ings including additional parking to the 
north of the facility and provision for 
added vehicle circulation as schematically 
shown on the plan presented to the meeting. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:05 p.m. 



r 




Robert 
Secretary, 



McCartney 
)ard of Trustee 




1 



COMMITTEE 



i! 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT AND 
UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

April 23, 1969, 2:00 p.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Emerson, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Troy; Treasurer 
Johnson. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Dean of Administration Redfern, 
Assistant Dean of Administration Gugin, 
Budget Officer Morrell, Acting Dean 
Gagnon, Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Emerson convened the meeting at 2:10 p.m. 
following luncheon at Hampden Dining Commons. He requested Dean 
of Administration Redfern to review and report on the legislative 
program of the University. 

Dean Redfern informed the committee that the President 
and the University had been invited to appear April 29 before the 
House Ways and Means Committee with reference to Budget Request, 
1970. The Dean suggested that the Trustees be represented also to 
underline concern with the budget situation and affirm Trustee 
policy on the budget issue. 

President Lederle said Chairman Healey had been advised 
and it is hoped he will be able to attend. It would be helpful to 
have . at least two Trustees present. 

Discussion was held during which the President outlined 
the planned presentation before the committee, including charts 
which would be used. He stressed the need for funds for the dis- 
advantaged program, noting it is not exclusively a black program. 
The Dean of Admissions and possibly other Department Heads will 
attend in order to supply any supporting information required. 

Dean Redfern stated the Legislature seemms inclined to 
take a pragmatic view and suggested the possibility of having the 
Deans and Department Heads speak to this. 

There was discussion of the effect of President Nixon's 
cutback of Federal Funds for special programs included in the 
budget. The Treasurer noted tha tthe State technical services pro- 
gram had appropriated $150,000 this current fiscal year dependent 
upon receiving matching Federal Funds. There will be no matching 
funds in 1970. The Treasurer suggested the possibility that the 
$150,000 might be available for urgent need in other areas of the 
University budget. 

The Dean of Administration reviewed the current status of 
certain bills of special interest to the University. These in- 
cluded: 



328? 



House Ways 
and Means 
Budget 
Request 



Budget 



3288 



COMMITTEE 



Review of 
Legislation 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

H.1755(now S.358) . This bill calls for making temporary positions 
permanent after three years. The bill has been passed by the 
Senate and is now in the House Ways and Means. Hopefully it will be 
voted and solve some of the temporary position problems at the Uni- 
versity. 

H.2978 . The two-step merit bill has been reported favorably out of 
the Education Committee and is now in House Ways and Means. 

H.4004 . Appointment of certain critical crafts, above existing 

minimum. This bill was killed on the basis that no legislation was 

necessary; authority is already vested under appropriate circum- 
stances. 

H.4005(now H.2003 ) . This bill would provide shift differentials; 
has been reported out of the Public Service Committee favorably, 
with recommendation for a $10 week differential (except nurses, who 
could receive more) . Currently this bill is in House Ways and 
Means . 

H. 678 . Bill to establish a law school at the University; reported 
favorably out of Committee on Education, now in House Ways and 
Means, where it is hoped to be acted upon favorably. 

H.996 . Bill to establish a dental school at the University; was 
favorably reported out of Committee on Education. 

H.4900 . State employees pay raise bill has been combined into new 
bill that incorporates others. Section two includes provision for 
a cost of living adjustment. This requires the Director of 
Personnel, on January 1 of each year, to determine what changes have 
occurred in the consumer price index. The following January, the 
state employees salary would reflect this change. 

H.291 . Bill to repeal fiscal autonomy. This was referred without 
vote to the Joint Committee on Rules, which provides an opportunity 
for the Senate to consider and amend this bill. 

H.3225 . Bill to include faculty as members of the Board of Trustees 
was reported out favorably by the Education Committee. It is now 
in the House. 

S.508 . Calls for a change in the name of SMTI to Southeastern 
Massachusetts University. This bill was passed by the Senate and is 
now in the House. 

Dean Redfern said the Medical School Salary Relief Bill is 
in the Ways and Means Committee. Dean Soutter has supplied a com- 
plete breakdown of costs, including faculty, for next year. 

The special capital outlay bill has passed. This will 
provide funds necessary for construction of the Medical School, 
planning money for the hospital and supplemental funds for library 
construction. In addition, a $432,000 supplemental federal grant 



I 



II 



COMMITTEE 



II 



1! 



3289 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

has been received which will save the state expenditure of this 
amount. The sum of $582,000 has been appropriated to complete 
Tobin Hall. 

The Governor has created an informal advisory group to 
continue review of the Medical School. A decision is to be made 
in mid -June. 

Dean Soutter is preparing material clarifying the relation 
of the teaching hospital to the overall concept of the Medical 
School. The material will be distributed to legislators so that the 
chronological development will be well known. It will also re- 
affirm that the teaching hospital is a part of the original and con 
tinuing plan. 

The 1969 deficiency budget was reviewed. Discussion was 
held. Treasurer Johnson said no action has yet been taken on this 
request, and it may be mid-June before a final decision is made. 
The operating budget has sustained cuts of 20% in Amherst and a 
greater percentage in Boston and Worcester. 

Efforts are being made to arrange an appointment for the 
President and the Medical Dean to meet with the Governor to discuss 
the urgency of the Medical School operating budget appropriation, 
if the Medical School is to be opened, as scheduled, in the fall of 
1970. An adequate operating budget is essential to this plan. 

The Governor's budget recommendations for fiscal 1970 
were analyzed and reviewed (Document T69-063) . It was noted that 
the largest reductions were in the personnel account. No new pro- 
grams are recommended. There is no educational television appro- 
priation; no continuing education appropriation. The amount of 
financial aid per student is gradually being reduced. Dean Redfern 
said a joint request, with the BHE will be filed, recommending that 
no institution should fall below the present per capita level. 

Dean Redfern stressed the urgency of preparing a plan for 
presentation to the Legislature as soon as the Boston faculty have 
pulled together an appropriate program. He advised that Chancellor 
Broderick and Acting Dean Gagnon are working on a booklet (Dick & 
Jane) which is expected to be descriptive of plans for the campus 
by the sea. 

Discussion was held on a memorandum received by the 
President from Chancellor Broderick with reference to transfers 
and renovations to classrooms. Reference was made to the agreement 
that the UM/B Summer School would be deferred due to lack of funds. 
The matters were considered appropriate for discussion by the ad- 
ministration, and not for submission to the committee. Trustee 
Troy said the state's money should not be spent on rental buildings 
and the total number of students should be topped off. 



Medical 
School 

Teaching 
Hospital 



Review of 
1969 Budget 



Plan for 
UM/ Boston 
Campus 



3290 



COMMITTEE 

Public 
Higher 
Education 
Public Re- 
lations Program 



Development 
Program 

Alumni 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean Redfern reported that the Senate President feels that 
he, the Speaker, and others have stemmed the "Teaching Revolt," but 
that support of others is vital. The BHE has developed a program. 
Assistant Dean Gugin described this as an intersegmented public 
relations campaign. Messrs. Melley and Keenan and their counter- 
parts in other segments have been preparing a serious of 30-second 
TV and radio spots and feature articles for the newspapers in the 
Commonwealth. The focus is on need to continue public support of 
public education is a "good investment," and what programs are 
available. This is under the aegis of BHE. The cost will be 
$6,000. An in-house meeting at BHE is scheduled for next week. It 
is hoped members of the Board of Trustees will be present to comment, 
criticize and suggest. If the meeting approves the presentation, it 
will then be made to the House and Senate leadership to demonstrate 
what is hoped to be done. No direct state funds are involved in 
this effort. A prestigious committee of outstanding citizens will 
sponsor the effort. 

Mr. Morrell was invited to comment on Document T69-063, 
"Analysis of Governor's Budget Recommendations - Fiscal Year Ending 
June 30, 1970," supplied to the Trustees in advance of the meeting. 
He drew attention to the summary statement included in the document 
and offered to respond to question. 

Trustee Crowley asked for information on the Development 
Program. The President briefly reported on a meeting held with the 
President of the Alumni Association. He said the Associate Alumni 
wish the University to take over the management of the Alumni maga- 
zine, but the matter of budget for this is unresolved. The President 
said we should be working toward a $1,000 club instead of $100 clubs, 
We are at a point where we can begin to plan. This will require 
someone who will follow it and devote his entire efforts to it. The 
salary will be in the $20,000 range, plus a secretary. In addition 
there should be a council to develop policy on fund raising. This 
group would be augmented with additional manpower when needed to 
work on the various facets. 

Trustee Crowley assured that the Directors of the Associa- 
tion are anxious for immediate action which should emanate from the 
administration, and the Alumni will respond. 

Trustee Troy said a good magazine is most important: eight 
or possibly ten issues a year. 



The meeting adjourned at 3:45 p.m. 




Robeirt J. McCartney 
Secretaryv Board of Truste 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
April 30, 1969, 4:35 p.m., Worcester, Mass. 



PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 

Trustees Haigis, Maginnis, Plimpton; 
Secretary McCartney. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Chancellor Broderick, Miss Coulter. 

A special meeting of the Committee on Faculty and Educa- 
tional Policy was held April 30, 1969 at 4:35 p.m. The purpose was 
to consider the proposal for UM/Boston summer school on Nantucket 
Island, summer of 1969. 

Chairman Troy invited Chancellor Broderick to inform the 
committee of developments and the current status of the proposal. 

Chancellor Broderick stated that since the meeting held 
April 17, 1969, the proposal has come before the UM/Boston Faculty 
Senate and received approval. Discussion ensued, during which the 
Chancellor responded to questions. 

After due consideration and comment and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To continue to study the proposal for a 
summer school on Nantucket and resubmit 
this project in due course, together with 
detailed program projections. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:42 p.m. 





Robert J . McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



3291 



UM/Boston 
Nantucket 
Summer 
School 



3292 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



BLANK PAGE 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

May 14, 1969, 11:00 a.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 

PRESENT: Chairman Troy, President Lederle, Trustees 

Boyden, Haigis, Maginnis, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Acting Dean of Arts & Sciences 
Shapiro; Budget Director Morrell; from History 
Department, Professors Berkman, Cary, Davis, 
Elam, Gordon, Greenbaum, Potash, Quint, 
Swenson, VanSteenberg, Ware, Wickwire; from 
Tenure and Grievance Committee, Professors 
Bond and Young; representative from Amherst 
College AAUP, Halsted; U of M representative 
of AAUP, Webb; from UM/B Professors Evans and 
Stock; Miss Coulter 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 11:00 a.m. He noted 
that documents relevant to two personnel cases to be considered were 
supplied in advance of the meeting (Documents T69-066 and T69-067) . 
The Chairman briefly summarized background on Professor Swenson who, 
on annual appointment as a member of the History Department, had not 
been reappointed upon recommendation of the department's personnel 
committee. He has appealed the decision. The case was investigated 
by the University Tenure and Grievance Committee and has received 
the consideration of the AAUP. Professor Swenson states that his 
non-reappointment is based on political rather than on professional 
criteria and academic performance. 

Professor Swenson distributed copies of a statement which 
incorporated his position (see Document T69-066) . He followed this 
with an oral presentation of the contents. 

Reference was made to a letter from the AAUP received by 
the Provost at 9:15 a.m. this date, and subsequently read to the 
meeting. The letter stated that appeals to the Board of Trustees 
should be necessary only on substantive matters, and the Swenson 
case involves only a procedural issue which could be easily re- 
solved within the faculty and administration. Chairman Troy advised 
that the letter would be studied with care. 

Professor Swenson responded to question on the procedural 
matters claimed to have been violated. He said, (1) he believed he 
had carried out his duties at the appropriate level, as set out in 
the statement on faculty personnel policy in the College of Arts and 
Sciences and, (2) he quoted from the Board of Trustees statement 
guaranteeing each faculty member full, fair, informed and impartial 
consideration, based on qualifications and experience, and including 
evaluation of teaching, research and service contributions. Pro- 
fessor Swenson claimed there was not adequate and proper considera- 
tion of his case, but rather a hasty review. He felt that his 



Q9QQ 



Professo r 

Victor 

Swenson 



3294 



COMMITTEE 



Professor 

Joann 

Chenault 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

termination was automatic and that professional criteria had not 
been applied in reviewing his performance. 

A full and lengthy discussion followed. The History De- 
partment Personnel Committee refuted the charge of hasty considera- 
tion of Professor Swenson's reappointment. It was brought out that 
the non-reappointment was based in part on a change in emphasis of 
the department curriculum. The department envisions a sharp 
curtailment of the specific course offerings in the area for which 
he was originally hired. Professor Swenson's specialty is Ottoman 
History, an area in which the department is not planning to enlarge 
its offerings in the foreseeable future. 

Professor Potash"' said the criteria that led to the non- 
reappointment decision transcended the personality of the complain- 
ant; that, in fact, three factors entered into the decision: 

1. the future needs of the department were the 
major consideration 

2. relevance of Professor Swenson's special inter- 
ests and talents to those needs was a factor 

3. his promise as a colleague 

Professor Potash reviewed the steps taken prior to the 
final decision including a mail ballot on which the college faculty 
voted that they did not any longer favor History 101 to be a requirec 
freshman course. 

After full discussion, the Chairman called for questions. 
There being none the meeting recessed for luncheon at 1:45 p.m. The 
committee reconvened at 2:30 p.m. 

On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they sustain the action of the Department 
of History Executive Committee in denying 
reappointment to Assistant Professor Victor 
Swenson for the 1969-1970 academic year. 

Professor Joann Chenault of the School of Education, Mr. 
Robert S. Bond, Chairman of the Tenure and Grievance Committee and 
Professor Webb, the AAUP observer-representative, rejoined the meet- 
ing. 

Professor Chenault presented her appeal that the Trustees 
overrule the Dean of the School of Education who had given her an 
expiration of appointment notice. 

The School of Education Faculty Personnel Committee had 
recommended reappointment of Professor Chenault. The Dean of the 
School of Education disagreed, After review, the Tenure and Grievanc 
Committee of the Faculty Senate recommended a one-year reappointment 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In stPmary, the School of Education Personnel Committee 
had discussed Dr. Chenault's reappointment along with others, on 
three occasions; November, 1967; July, 1968; and August, 1968. On 
all of these occasions the committee recommended reappointment, 
although the July decision was "with reservations." Use of this 
term is the result of a point system of evaluation developed by the 
Personnel Committee. Dean Allen interpreted this recommendation as 
negative. The committee then convened in August to reconsider the 
"with reservations" qualification. At this meeting, they recommended 
Dr. Chenault for reappointment and dropped the phrase "with reserva- 
tions . " 

Again, Dean Allen disagreed with the committee and main- 
tained his previous position recommending non-reappointment . He 
communicated his action orally to the Personnel Committee. 

Dean Allen joined the meeting. 

Dr. Chenault referred to the AAUP policy that faculty 
recommendations on personnel matters should be followed "except in 
rare instances and for compelling reasons which should be stated 
in detail." She questioned whether in fact Dean Allen had "com- 
pelling reasons" for not following the recommendation of the faculty 
committee in the matter of her reappointment. 

Dean Allen affirmed that his recommendation remained nega- 
tive. He said his decision was based on recommendations of Miss 
Chenault's colleagues in Guidance, where the majority of reports 
were negative. 

Dean Allen stated that a group of students came to him in 
support of Dr. Chenault. A search of his files on that occasion, 
however, revealed that none of the evaluation froms required by 
School of Education regulations had, in fact, been filed. Dr. 
Chenault stated that 46 evaluations had been made, but were not filed 
in view of the Dean's indication that was not to continue on the 
staff. 

Discussion was held during which it was stated that the 
Tenure and Grievance Committee report indicated that Dr. Chenault 
was a good teacher. 

Dean Allen stated that Miss Chenault is not without her 
professional merit, but the judgment being made here concerns annual 
reappointment. The rule is that the University has no obligation to 
reappoint non-tenured persons in the annual appointment category. 
The negative judgment about Miss Chenault was based on a number of 
criteria synthesized by his own professional judgment. 



He said he felt he could find a better person for the 



area. 



3295 



3296 



COMMITTEE 



Revision of 
English 
Major Re- 
quirements 

UM/ Bos ton 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In response to Chairman Troy's request for further 
comments, Professor Bond, Chairman of the Tenure and Grievance Com- 
mittee, said that his committee's report covered their viewpoint. 
He said the committee had conducted thorough hearings on this case. 
He felt that reasonable recommendations were made in their report. 
He asked that Dr.Chenault be reappointed for a year and then 
evaluated for a tenure appointment. He noted that tenure considera- 
tion is rather rigid. This should clarify any difference of view- 
point. 

Dr. Chenault stated again that the established School of 
Education policy was not followed in her case, and that the summer 
meeting of the Personnel Committee did not allow opportunity for 
the members to react as a' committee to the Dean's recommendation. 



After discussion, motion was made, seconded and it 



was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

they sustain the action of Dean Dwight Allen 
of the School of Education in Denying re- 
appointment to Assistant Professor Joann 
Chenault for the 1969-1970 academic year. 

Chancellor Broderick, Professor Irving Stock and Professor 
Robert Evans joined the meeting. 

Professor Stock, Acting Head of the English Department of 
UM/B presented a proposal for revision in the current English major 
requirements. This proposal has been approved by the Humanities 
Division Executive Committee and the Faculty Senate (Document T69-06J 
The new concept replaces course distribution requirements now pre- 
scribed for English majors with a program charging the student with 
the responsibility for developing his own selection of courses. 
Extensive expansion of the advising program is planned, in recogni- 
tion of the department's responsibility to insure that such selec- 
tions are wisely made. An increase in conferences between students 
and faculty outside the classroom is also envisaged. The department 
seeks to recognize the maturity of contemporary students and to 
foster their ability intelligently to choose courses and instructors 
most likely to develop their special skills and interests. 

The program is innovative and creative it seeks to educate 
the student's judgment as well as his mind by giving him the responsi 
bility for his own program. It is expected to promote a vital com- 
munity of students and faculty committeed to the study of English and 
American literature. 

The essential features of the revised program are: 

1. The student, as at present, takes a minimum of 

eight courses to qualify for a degree in English, 
and must also meet the normal University and 
Humanities Division core course requirements. 



) 



COMMITTEE 



329 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

2. Within the English Department the student is 
given the responsibility for selecting his 
courses in consultation with his advisor and, 

if he wishes, with one or all of the Conferences. 

3. Three Conferences are established for the pur- 
pose of discussion and advice among students 
and faculty of generally similar interests. 

4. The importance of the student - advisor 
relationship is greatly increased. 

Professor Stock stated that the students have indicated 
great interest in the proposal. Tufts has a program that is 
similar, in which five or six possible sequences are offered. 

Chairman Troy noted that such a program would need control 
to insure that students would receive a rounded education. Pro- 
fessor Stock agreed. 

After further discussion and comment and on motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the proposed revision in the English major 
requirements (Documents T69-068) for UM/ 
Boston be approved. 

Chancellor Broderick noted this is a bold and innovative 
concept; that the faculty voted for it almost without dissent. It 
is important that the department exercise firm review and watch 
progress closely. 

Professor Robert Evans presented a proposal for a merger 
of the Hearld-Traveler Repertory Company and the UM/Boston Pro- 
fessional Theatre Program (Document T69-069) . 

Professor Evans informed the committee that the Herald- 
Traveler wished to phase out their "going concern;" that UM/B wants 
to phase the proposal in. He stated that this is an unusual oppor- 
tunity. It is proposed that the Herald-Traveler Company, in associ- 
ation with UM/B, would present the American Theater Company in three 
consecutive ten-week seasons of three plays each fall. The first 
season would be at Natick High School and Rindge Tech auditoriums 
(Othello, Macbeth and As You Like It); five weeks each, from October 
until Christmas. The second and third season would be a continuatiot 
of similar offerings. At the end of the third year, the Herald- 
Traveler would offer UM/B the operation for its own, on condition 
that UM/B would not jettison the high school audience. During the 
three years, grants-in-aid would be sought to help the operation. 

Chancellor Broderick pointed out the issue is one of ulti 
mate priorities. If it is intended to enter the area of performing 
arts, this is a fine opportinity. It would be a limited and con- 
trolled investment, and with three years of experience the University 
would be in a position to move into a more ambitious program at 
Columbia Point. 



UM/Boston 
Professional 
Theatre 
Program & 
Herald- 
Traveler 
Repertory 
Company 



3298 



COMMITTEE 



Waiver of 
Tuition at 
State Colleges 
or Lowell 
Technological 
Institute 



President Lederle elicitedcomments from Budget Director 
Morrell who said that many questions were raised which would re- 
quire investigation, including source of income and status of the 
employees. Professor Evans said that many state universities have 
theatre companies. 

President Lederle briefly outlined some of the complicated 
questions which would require solution including revenue. Chairman 
Troy felt these difficulties would not be insupportable but asked 
what feasible source of funds would be available. 

The President said that UM/Boston must decide whether it 
is worth it to divert funds to this purpose. He raised also the 
basic issue of priorities. He noted that the student involvement 
could be beneficial. 

Professor Evans stated that the decision must be trans- 
mitted to the Herald-Traveler Corporation as quickly as possible. 

Discussion was held on the terms of the proposal (see 
Document III, page 2) . It is proposed that the University supply 
$35,000 pre-production money for each of the three years. The 
Herald-Traveler would underwrite the remaining costs. As estimate 
of entire annual cost was made at $98,000. After further inquiry 
and comment, Chairman Troy stated it to be the consensus that the 
committee is very much interested, but the matter will require 
further study. The Treasurer will explore the details and present 
a report at the next Board meeting on May 30. With more precise 
facts in hand, it will be possible to set up another meeting and 
arrive at a decision. 

President Lederle said that all facets of the contract in- 
cluding the relation to equity must be explored. The University 
must know exactly what it is committee to and insure that our stu- 
dents are getting a real education. 

Chairman Troy then advised the committee of a vote for- 
warded by the Board of Trustees of State Colleges and also from the 
Board of Trustees of Lowell Technological Institute indicating that 
these Boards would consider a request which would permit full-time 
faculty members from the University to take courses without tuition 
charges. At the State Colleges, the Continuing Studies Program 
would be the vehicle. Accordingly, on motion made and seconded, it 
was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees, in response 
to the kind invitation of the Board of Trustees of 
State Colleges and the Board of Trustees of the 
Lowell Technological Institute, that formal request 
be made of these bodies for waiver of tuition for 
full-time faculty members of the University of 
Massachusetts who wish to pursue courses through 



j3'"-p- vi m ;.; 



COMMITTEE 



j 



3299 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Continuing Studies Program at any of the 
state colleges, or at the Lowell Technological 
Institute. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:50 p.m. 




Secre 




J. McCartnew 
y, Board of Trustees 



3300 



COMMITTEE 



Health 
Services 
Fees - 
Increase 

UM/ Amherst 



Boarding 
Hall Trust 
Fund Changes 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

May 21, 1969, 10:30 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass, 

PRESENT : Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Boyden, Emerson, Haigis, 
Lyons, Pumphret, Troy; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick, 
Dean Redfern, Miss Coulter. 



The meeting was convened at 10:30 a.m. 

President Lederle introduced discussion of a proposed in- 
crease in the Student Health Fee from $25 to $30. A detailed ex- 
planatory memorandum from the Director of the University Health Ser- 
vices,' Dr. Gage, (Document T69-072) pointed; to sharp increases in 
operating expenses. A national increase in cost of medical care of 
approximately 107» was related to the increase in salaries for the 
professional staff in order to remain competitive with other oppor- 
tunities available to them in the medical field. Also, anticipated 
pay raises for all state employees is expected to further increase 
payroll costs. Salaries constitute 80% of total expenses for the 
University Health Services. 

Retention of the $25 fee would dictate reduction of ser- 
vices in the present health program. The proposed increase will 
sustain the health program at its present level. The proposal has 
been considered and approved by both the Graduate and Undergraduate 
Student Senates. 

In response to question, Treasurer Johnson explained that 
the State furnishes only the Infirmary building and for its mainte- 
nance and operation exclusive of custodial services. All other ex- 
penses, including janitorial salaries, are paid out of trust funds. 



After further discussion, motion was made, seconded, 



and it was 



VOTED: 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the student health fee be increased to $30 
per semester effective for the first semester 
of the 1969-70 academic year. 

The Treasurer briefly reviewed the proposals relating to 
the Boarding Hall Trust Fund as incorporated in Document T69-073. 
A request was outlined for a $20 increase in the 15-meal (5-day) 
rate, ($265 per semester) and a change in weekend meal service to 
provide meals in three dining hall snack bars and the Student Union 
instead of the regular cafeteria serving areas and dining rooms. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



3301 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson noted that weekend tickets would be usable anywhere 
on campus and that there would always be an opportunity for students 
to eat on campus throughout the weekend. 

Here again the additional revenue will be required to meet 
the cost of the anticipated pay increase for all State employees, as 
well as for equipment reserve and renovations. 

Treasurer Johnson advised that the change in weekend meal 
service and rate increase had been considered and approved by the 
Student Senate Services Committee and by the Student Senate. During 
the course of discussions, students indicated that future considera- 
tion should be given to longer periods for serving evening meals, 
and to providing increased opportunity for student involvement in 
plans and arrangements for such proposals. 

After comment and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
until and subject to further action of the 
Trustees amending the same, the following 
be and hereby is adopted as the schedule of 
charges for meals to be served commencing 
with the first day of the semester to commence 
in September 1969 in student dining facilities, 
other than any owned or leased by University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority, operated 
by the Trustees and that the following be and 
hereby are fixed as the fees, rents, rates and 
other charges for any other use of any such 
facility on and after such date: 

Schedule of Charges : 

For 15 meals per week - $265 per semester (this 
does not include meals for holidays or vacations 
of more than one day' s duration) . 



Per day 



Per meal 



$3.12 (Effective for summer school, 
vacation periods, etc.) 



Breakfast 

Lunch 

Dinner 



$ 



.95 
1.30 
1.65 



The foregoing rates supersede those established by 
vote of the Trustees May 3, 1968. Group meals, con- 
ference rates, individual food and drink items -- 
such amount as the Treasurer of the University shall 
fix to cover the cost of materials and special ser- 
vices plus reasonable provision for other costs and 
expenses. 



3302 



COMMITTEE 



Graduate 
Student 
General Fee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Fees, rents, rates and other charges for other uses 
of student dining facilities : 

For rental or other use of all or any part of a 
facility -- such amount as the Treasurer of the 
University shall fix to cover the cost of any 
special services plus reasonable provision for 
other costs and expenses. 

Refund Schedule 

A student who withdraws from the University after 
paying a semester meal charge shall be entitled to a 
pro-rata refund on such charge, less administrative 
costs in such amount as the Treasurer of the Univer- 
sity may fix, provided, that no such refund shall be 
charged against any meal charge proceeds which are 
payable to University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority under any Management and Services Agreement 
relating to any dining facility owned or leased by 
the Authority. The Treasurer shall report to the 
Trustees all charges, fees, rents and rates established 
by him under authority of this resolution. No such 
charge, fee, rent, or rate so established shall be 
reduced, but may be increased, without prior approval 
of the Committee of the Trustees on Buildings and 
Grounds. 

It was also 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
VOTED : That the schedule of charges set forth in the fore- 
going vote be and hereby is recommended to University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority for adoption as 
the schedule of charges and other fees for meals 
served in and other uses of dining facilities owned 
or leased by it and that the Secretary of the Trustees 
be and hereby is directed to certify these votes to 
the Authority as the writing provided for in Manage- 
ment and Services Agreements now in effect between the 
Commonwealth and the Authority pertaining to such 

dining facilities, 
i 

The Treasurer informed the committee that the Graduate 
School summer school fees schedule proved to be unworkable due to 
the manner in which courses are set up (Document T69-074) . It is, 
therfore, recommended by the Graduate School and Graduate Student 
Senate to return to a weekly charge, concommitant that charged the 
undergraduate students. 



After consideration and on motion made and seconded, it 



was 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
vote of January 30, 1967 with reference to 
Graduate School Summer School fees be revised 
as follows: 

To delete 

"A fee of $2.50 per credit hour shall be assessed 
for each summer session" and add - The Summer 
Session fees charged to graduate students for 
such facilities and services as the Infirmary, 
Student Union and Activities shall be assessed 
on a per week basis at the same rate as for under- 
graduate students. 

Chancellor Broderick submitted a proposal for an increase 
in the Health Services fee for the Boston campus (Document T69-075) 
Dr. Pryor, Director of UM/B Health Services, had requested a 507o in- 
crease in the budget, which would have resulted in a $15 fee due to 
the increase in numbers of students and increased use of the Health 
Services. Chancellor Broderick modified this request to a 207o in- 
crease (from $10 to $12 per term) in view of the overall budgetary 
stringency. Two needs must be met: (1) pay raises; (2) health 
service expansion. He described future plans which include appoint- 
ment of an Assistant Director who will do the clinical work on a 
full half-time basis. At preseat, this is on a 1/4-time basis. 

After comment and discussion and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Health Services Fees for the Boston 
campus be increased from $4 to $5 in the summer 
session and from $10 to $12 per term in the 
regular academic year. 

President Lederle informed the committee that the so- 
called "Bonham Report", a survey of legislative and external rela- 
tions by the professional consulting firm, Science and University 
Affairs, had not been received. . Although a draft had been promised 
on several occasions in the past six months, none has as yet been 
received. 

There was general discussion on the subject of legislative 
liaison. The need for a report such as Mr. Bonham is preparing 
was stressed. The BHE plan for a Citizens' Committee of outstanding 
persons to sponsor a public relations program for public higher 
education was mentioned. This statewide program, involving all 
segments of public higher education, will attempt to garner public 
interest in broader support for higher education in Massachusetts. 
President Lederld stated that the state level staff work at present 
is being carried to a great degree as an extra load by Secretary 
McCartney's staff at the University, particularly by Messrs. Melley 
and Keenan. The other institutions in higher education must also 



3303 



3oA->e 



UM/ Bos ton 
Health 
Services 
Fee Increase 



Bonham 
Report 



3304 



COMMITTEE 



Chief 
Officer 
UM/ Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

work toward fruition of this program, with leadership, ultimately 
provided from the BHE. A series of television and radio spot 
announcements are part of the plan, as well as broadsides of the 
campaign and background material to be made available to education 
and editorial writers among others. 

The President then commented on the problem brought about 
by the resignation of the Dean of Administration, Dr. Leo Redfern, 
who will assume the presidency of another college on August 1. Dr. 
Redfern has been responsible for legislative relations, assisted by 
Dr. Gugin and Mr. Cass, Assistant Director of Labor Relations at 
UM/Boston. The Amherst based staff has been augmented to handle 
legislative phone inquiries without undue delay. It now becomes 
pertinent to establish policy on replacement of this key position. 

Chairman Healey solicited Dr. Redfern' s recommendation on 
the practical aspects and requirements for the future so as to in- 
sure proper legislative liaison. The Dean outlined the two major 
areas: (1) communicating with the general public; (2) establishing 
personal working relationships with state agencies, including the 
legislators. He felt that a team approach would be more effective 
in ('2) above, rather than a single representative. One member of 
the team should be available for daily contact on routine matters. 
At a different level, an additional person would carry out all 
details. An added advantage of the team concept would be the possi- 
bility of affording time and opportunity to devote to inter-agency 
relationships. He noted the possibility also of working out an 
arrangement that could be clearly understood. Hopefully, such 
matters will be covered in the Bonham Report. 

Chairman Healey stated that no major decisions should be 
made in the area under discussion- without the benefit of the con- 
clusions to be incorporated in the Bonham Report. He urged that 
this report, commissioned months ago, be secured - at least in 
summary - without further delay. In the meantime, staffing and pro- 
gram will continue on the present basis in so far as possible. 

President Lederle suggested that the committee consider a 
more logical title for the Chief Officer of the Amherst campus. He 
recommended that the title "Chancellor" replace that of Provost. 
This would unify titles in the university-wide system, by providing 
for a Chancellor on each campus. No political implications are in- 
volved. No change would be necessary at Worcester since it is a 
single school. 

Trustee Pumphret questioned whether this would be a change 
in title only or whether the suggestion carried added responsibilities 
or other changes. 

Chairman Healey expressed concern for the basic implica- 
tions of the total University system-wide structure. He referred 
to the vote of the Board at its April meeting, directing the Execu- 
tive Committee to designate a committee structure to review the 
organizational structure of all the campuses, together with their 
inter- relationships. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



] 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman said this refers to how the segments within 
the University system relate to each other and how they operate. 
The Board, he said, should stay away from detailed operation of the 
University and confine itself primarily to the broad policy question^, 
and spend time in that area. However, first the Board must be 
certain that a proper operational structure is established, one 
that will work effectively, so that responsibility can be delegated. 
Then, the Board will have effective control. He noted, for example, 
the need for greater advance notice in matters of budgetary review. 

In order for the Board of Trustees to delegate authority, 
the general operational structure of the University must be re- 
viewed also in terms of the total plan of intersegmental relation- 
ships. The work of the Long- Range Planning Committee should pro- 
ceed in close liaison with the Trustees so that they are aware of 
its recommendations well in advance of its final presentation. 

Discussion was then held on the composition of the com- 
mittee to make recommendations on system-wide organization to the 
Board. It was agreed that the committee would consist of five men 
each from the Amherst and Boston campuses and two from Worcester, 
plus a staff assistant whose duty it would be to put together the 
combined ideas (in effect: draft a report) for submission to the 
Executive Committee. 

The Staff Assistant will be selected on the basis of 
approval by all campuses. It was further agreed that the President, 
Provost and Chancellor will compile a list of persons suggested to 
serve on the System Organization Committee. The list is to be pre- 
sented at the May 30 meeting of the Board, and will include a repre- 
sentative group of Deans, Department Heads and Faculty. 



Treasurer Johnson reported on the current status of the 
budget appropriations. He noted that cuts made by the House Ways 
and Means Committee, plus those recommended by the Governor have 
put the University in a deficit operating condition. for next year 
unless cutbacks are made now. Although the budget contains $2.5 
million more than the current year appropriation, this is absorbed 
in fixed costs already committee including salary adjustments. In 
spirt of this, 1500 additional students have again been accepted for 
the next academic year. One hundred new faculty positions have 
been authorized by the Governor in accordance with the usual 15 to 1 
formula, but funds, apparently, have not been appropriated for all 
of these positions. 

The Treasurer detailed the many accounts which were 
affected by the cut in funds. The position of the budget, he des- 
cribed as "critical." He asked for advice on a course of action, 
and how to proceed, pending possible restoration at least to the 
level the Governor recommended. Should, for example, all vacant 
positions be frozen. 



3305 



Committee 
Review of 
Organizational 
Structure of 
University 



Budget 



3306 



COMMITTEE 



Columbia 
Point 



UmVER&lfTKWJCMF/ NTASSAtSISUSeTnTS 

Dean Redfern advised that the Legislature has been in- 
formed by the faculty as well as student groups that lack of funds 
would dictate a freeze.' 

After comment and discussion, Chairman Healey stated that 
we are rapidly approaching a time when there will be no other course 
but to declare a freeze on admissions and seal off growth. Ample 
advance warning should be given to the legislature before this 
occurs. Notices will have to be sent to students that, although 
qualified, they cannot be admitted because of insufficiency of 
operating appropriations. 

Dean Redfern recommended that the leadership be notified 
that the 1500 students accepted for this year will be the last, as 
the University is in a deficiency situation which cannot continue. 
Provost Tippo agreed that virtually all segments have now come to 
this viewpoint. For the fall of 1969, it may become necessary to 
close down some sections and some classes because of lack of teachers 
but he assured that every effort will be made to do the best possible 
job within the situation facing the University. 

Chairman Healey requested Dean Redfern to communicate 
clearly to the Senate the position into which the University has now 
been forced. In the meantime, it was agreed: 

1. to establish a freeze on all appointments (vacancies 
and new positions) - professional and non-professional 

2. to get in touch with the Senate Ways and Means 
Committee 

3. to report back to the Board on May 30, 1969 

Treasurer Johnson reported on a meeting held with Mr. 
Shepard, Deputy Commissioner for Fiscal Affairs for the Commonwealth, 
concerning proposed legislation for the acquisition of Columbia 
Point and the initiation of construction. The total concept for the 
first 5,000 students involves a cost of $150 million. Commissioner 
Shepard suggested the possibility that construction of the approach 
road (interchange with Morrissey Boulevard) might be handled on MDC 
highway funds, also, that Public Works could perhaps assist in con- 
nection with the land that must be crossed. He suggested that the 
requests be revised immediatelyto the $50 million range, which would 
not provide for all construction of buildings for 5,000 students, 
but would insure the moving forward on site acquisition and develop- 
ment work including utilities, as well as total planning for the 
project. Under this approach, some funds would be available for con- 
struction of buildings. Chairman Healey noted it would be encourag- 
ing to receive total planning money, and this will provide impetus 
toward the next step. 

Chairman Healey explored with Chancellor Broderick the 
possibility of acquisition of the Boston College High School 
property. Conversations with Fr. McGovern have given indication that 



li 



:3TTIMM03 



II 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the property will be for sale. More information may be secured 
prior to the next Board meeting and presented at that time. Chair- 
man Healey noted that, although the University was not seeking this 
property, if it does become available, it could be of interest. 

The proposed policy for the UM/ Amherst campus, relative to 
continuing appointment policies and other matters, as detailed in 
document supplied to the members of the committee in advance of the 
meeting, was postponed for full discussion at the meeting of the 
Board, May 30. Trustee Pumphret stated his opposition to the pro- 
posal. He felt the minuses outweighed the advantages. He pointed 
out that experience would not indicate a history of capricious 
switching of personnel by the administration, nor the need of safe- 
guards against this, to insure employment. He pointed out that in 
fact the proposed (s.7) to grant continuing appointment at the end 
of the sixth year has the inherent disadvantage to the employee of 
then being dependent upon this factor. Trustee Troy concurred and 
questioned the need for establishment of a policy at this time. 

Dean Redfern explained that the proposed policy relative 
to continuing appointment policies, rules and regulations, for non- 
academic professional staff; as well as the proposed general policy 
statement on professional personnel actions, are consonant with 
existing policies of the Board relative to members of the faculty. 
The proposal merely extends to all professional staff members the 
established system of consultation and evaluation now enjoyed by 
the faculty. He stated that he and the Treasurer have consulted 
with many groups on campus relative to the proposal and a strong 
sentiment exists for such a plan. 

There was general discussion. In response to a question 
Dean Redfern stated he had no knowledge of a similar policy else- 
where and possibly this would be a pioneering decision. However, 
the Provost noted that it does create as many problems as it solves. 

After further consideration, it was agreed that an im- 
proved rationalization of the proposal will be developed by the 
proponents . 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:15 p.m. 



330? 




Boston 
College 
High School 



Job Security 
For Non- 
Academic 
Professional 
Personnel 



3308 



COMMITTEE 



WMUA-FM 

Power Increase 

Request 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

June 10, 1969, 10:00 a.m., Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Lyons, President Lederle; 
Trustees Croce, Plimpton, Rowland; 
Secretary McCartney. 



Chancellor Broderick; Professor James 
Ryan, UM/ Bos ton Faculty Senate; Mr. 
Eshbach, Mr. Keenan, Mr. Re id, Mr. 
Hulsen from the University Broadcast- 
ing Cduncil; Mr. Jay Ballard and Mr. 
Richard Stadlen from Station WMUA; 
Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Lyons convened the meeting at 10:15 a.m. He 
stated that the Board of Trustees of the University holds the 
license for the student radio station WMUA-FM. The student manage- 
ment of the station requests an increase in power to 1,000 watts, 
incorporation of a stereo capacity and removal of the transmitter 
location to Orchard Hill. The University Broadcasting Council, how- 
ever, recommends that no increase in the effective radiated power 
be requested at this time pending determination of the results of 
the relocation of the transmitting facilities. The Council also 
recommends appointment of an ad hoc study group composed of Council 
members, representatives of WFCR, WMUA and the Student Senate to 
study these questions. 

The purpose of the meeting, the Chairman said, was to hear 
the situation and' resolve the conflict. He then invited Mr. Richard 
Stadlen, General Manager of WMUA, to outline details of the 
requested pwoer increase. 

Mr. Stadlen said WMUA has been a ten watt station for 
twenty years. He pointed to the growth of the University and said 
the radio station had not grown with it. The basic problem is that 
many students cannot receive the station. A firm of consulting 
engineers (Kear and Kennedy, Washington, D.C.) were asked to do a 
study and form suggestions for improvement in the transmitting 
facilities. Their preliminary report contained alternatives includ 
ing relocation of the antenna to an Orchard Hill site. A subsequent 
report, based on a redefinition of WMUA's aims, recommended increase 
of power to 1,000 watts. The redefined aims included: filling in 
receptivity gaps on the campus; reaching commuter students; moving 
up to stereo transmission. Mr. Stadlen referred to pending legis- 
lation at FCC that would" require all FM stations to be able to 
broadcast in stereo, in which case ten watts would be inadequate. 
In addition, the Student Senate supports the plans for a power in- 
crease, and for stereo operation. It has provided a suitable appro 
priation in the budget, with the stipulation that no funds would be 
available for WMUA next year if the station does not go to higher 
wattage. 



i 



COMMITTEE 



I 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The five faculty advisers to WMUA have carefully con- 
sidered the request to increase the power, advance to stereo and 
move the transmitter location to Orchard Hill, Mr. Stadlen said. 
After study of the reports of the consulting engineers, the advisers 
believe that all three facets are essential to the future of the 
station. It was pointed out that many campus listeners live in 
steel-reinforced dormitories, at some distance from the center of 
the campus; also, they expect to hear broadcasts in stereo. 

In response to question, Mr. Ballard, Chief Engineer of 
WMUA, said the increase from ten watts to 1,000 watts was considered 
a reasonable figure, based on the experience of other stations. He 
cited Harvard as an example. There would be no station interference 
on the FM band by WMUA at 1,000 watts. Because of the terrain, and 
the high-rise buildings, ten watts is inadequate, Mr. Ballard 
stated. The coverage problems are related to low power and location 
of present operation. He said there would be no question of high 
power interference with WFCR. 

Chairman Lyons asked for comment on the statement in a 
letter from Mr. Peterson of Jansky & Bailey (a Washington engineer- 
ing consulting firm retained by the University). Mr. Ballard said 
the basic position of Jansky & Bailey is that 10 watt operations 
enjoy a much simpler set of FCC requirements than those of higher 
powered stations, and thus the 10 watt operation should be retained. 
Mr. Ballard held that WMUA has been a pioneer and has prided itself 
on the excellence of its engineering. Though not required to, it 
has always kept detailed logs as well as other records not required 
by FCC for 10 watt stations. Their operation is well within 
accepted engineering practice. As stated by Kear and Kennedy, WMUA, 
in most respects of its detailed operation, already operates as if 
it were a high-powered station. In view of the fact that WMUA 
chooses not to take advantage of the permissive rules it is now 
subject to, Mr. Ballard stated that the change to higher power would 
not affect its internal operations substantially, as suggested by 
Jansky & Bailey. 

In response to question, Mr. Stadlen said that campus 
clearance had been received to relocate the antenna facility at 
Emily Dickinson dormitory on Orchard Hill. 

In response to Trustee Rowland's suggestion of shorter 
area coverage, Mr. Ballard stated that FM stations, in order to 
direct signals, require complicated and expensive antenna mechanisms 
He stressed the impracticality of the consideration. 

Chairman Lyons noted that the Broadcasting Council does 
not approve and does not recommend the increase in power. He in- 
vited comment from the representatives of the Council. 

Professor Reid submitted that the matter should be dis- 
cussed in terms of objectives to be achieved. In any event antenna 
relocation is indicated regardless of power, due to reception 
problems in high-rise buildings. With reference to reaching 



3309 



3310 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

commuters, evidence was presented, he said, as to where commuters 
live. An impression was gained that they live near campus anyway, 
this if the campus area were covered effectively, the aim of reach- 
ing most commuters would be accomplished. He said if the station 
were to become in effect a regional station, a number of problems 
would evolve, including difference programming requirements and more 
stringent internal operation of the station. He expressed some doubt 
that such a change in operation would be in the student benefit. He 
was concerned that with WMLJA operating as a regional station it 
would cease to be a real student station. He questioned also 
whether this would be in the public interest. 

Mr. Hulsen, in response to Trustee Rowland's question, 
stated there are two University stations: one operated cooperatively 
by Five Colleges (WFCR) and one by the University students with 
student funds. The Board of Trustees hold the licenses in the 
public interest for both stations. It was his opinion that the 
Trustees could use WMUA, the 10 watt facility, for a good valid 
purpose. A 10 watt, class D coverage is not wide, but if it were to 
increase power it would become a real broadcast station and would be 
obligated to serve the public. Mr. Hulsen held that a better use of 
the facility would be to make it a legitimate training operation for 
students to move in tandem with WFCR, the higher powered station. 
Mr. Hulsen said he considered use of the facility at more than 10 
watts on its present programming basis as a waste of public property 
He said more could be done with the present 10 watt station to make 
it an active aspect of the educational program. Mr. Hulsen posed 
for WMLJA the alternatives of (1) closed circuit (2) creating more 
valuable educational use of the station (3) turning the entire 
operation over to the students, including the license. 

Mr. Keenan commented that the station operates under a 
license held by the Trustees. However, the station is financed by 
student funds. The students wish to increase the power of the sta- 
tion in order to provide a little more challenge. He felt it would 
be in the public interest to supply such a challenge, since it would 
provide professional training. The problem would be that in going 
to high power and assuming the added responsibility, professional 
guidance would be needed. No such adequate guidance is presently 
available to the students. If this could be provided, the station 
with the proposed increase in power could provide a real service. 
The students now have faculty advisers who do not lend direct pro- 
fessional or technical assistance, but at high power, and assuming 
a different audience profile, it would be necessary to have a much 
more actively involved faculty advisers group. 

As a parallel to the Collegian , Chairman Lyons questioned 
whether an audience of 15,000 on campus would not supply sufficient 
challenge to the students; why, in other words, is 1,000 watts 
needed to develop the kind of responsibility mentioned? 

Trustee Croce asked for definition of the requirements of 
FCC for a 1,000 watt station, as related to programming. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



] 



i 



3311 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Hulsen explained that as soon as a station goes beyond 
10 watts in power the class is changed and it is necessary to add 
more sophisticated technical equipment. In addition, there is a 
moral requirement in regard to radio spectrum space which is public 
property. Mr. Eshbach added that (1) in comparison with the 
Collegian , WMUA is using part of the public spectrum; the Collegian 
is not (2) WMUA operates on a license held by the Board of Trustees; 
the Collegian does not have these public responsibilities. He felt 
that WMUA should be a student station and that the power should be 
low enough so that it's coverage would not extend beyond the campus. 

Discussion was held, during which Mr. Stadlen outlined the 
activities of the station, which included (1) basic wake-up service 
(2) music programming during the day of interest to students (3) edu- 
cational - where an effort is made not to duplicate WFCR programs, 
but to assume a different approach and supply material of special 
interest to the younger generation. There is one hour of educational, 
programming per evening related to student matters. The Dean of 
Students appears regularly as a guest on this program. An open- 
ended view is taken of educational programs, rather than a rigid 
view. Plans are in process for more involvement with student pro- 
gramming, for example, encouraging submission of original scripts to 
be produced. Famous speakers visiting the campus are broadcast as 
a service to the campus community; major University sports events 
are broadcast. Some programs, for example on Biafra, the Jimmy 
Fund, SDS , etc., would be of interest to a wider group and would be 
suitable for broadcast beyond the campus if the power were increased 
Mr. Stadlen noted that because of the destructive storm just prior 
to commencement time, WFCR was out of business and WMUA was able to 
supply the major networks such as NBC, Mutual, and CBS with their 
requirements. In addition, they broadcast WFCR's evening program 
and provided informational service on commencement. He noted that 
these services were performed in spite of the fact that only four 
students operating as a skeleton crew were on hand at the time. He 
drew attention to the generally favorable record of broadcasting 
made by WMUA. 

Chairman Lyons asked Mr. Stadlen to comment on the resolve 
of the Broadcasting Council to establish an ad hoc study group to 
study the questions raised by WMUA's request, relating to the most 
effective use of the publicly owned, trustee licensed frequency 
space. Mr. Stadlen expressed conviction that the results of such a 
study would be favorable. He also advised that the FCC is prepar- 
ing to study the FM band and may decide to lump 10 watt stations to- 
gether. This could have the result of binding WMUA so closely with 
the others that it would be impossible to increase power at a later 
date without interfering with another station. Basically, the con- 
cern is about FCC's future plans. 

Trustee Rowland commented that it seems apparent that the 
transmitter should be relocated no matter what the ultimate plan 
adopted is. She asked whether the students would be willing to try 
the transmitter relocation pending completion of a study. 



3312 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Stadlen said that a study already has indicated it 
would not be possible to achieve the desired purpose at 10 watts. 
He agreed that a high powered station would require added staff and 
much more formal planning, and some consideration has been given to 
this. Included in the considerations is formation of a private 
corporation to group together all student communications activities, 
including the Collegian and Yahoo . 

Trustee Plimpton queried what the result would be if WMUA 
were to get closer faculty supervision. Mr. Keenan stated that if 
the station were to increase to 1,000 watts, it would be necessary 
to develop firm, professional programming. 

Secretary McCartney referred to the improvement of the 
Collegian toward professionalism after the addition of Mr. Oickle, 
a professional journalist who was compensated for giving hours of 
consultation several days a week to the editorial staff. 

Discussion was held, during which Professor Reid said that 
WMUA is a good student station. At higher wattage, however, it is a 
different matter. It was pointed out that audience analysis would 
become a part of necessary planning, and competition with area com- 
mercial stations is a factor which must be considered. 

WMUA's Chief Engineer said actually that the primary ob- 
jective is to "fill in the pattern." Equipment has been budgeted 
and approval of the Student Senate secured. Both Harvard and 
Emerson are on fewer hours than WMUA, which is on the air longer thai 
any non-commerical station. Mr. Ballard added that, because of 
terrain, it would be more practical to place the transmitter at 
Orchard Hill. Mr. Eshbach pointed out that there would be no 
guarantee, even at 1,000 watts, that all areas of the campus would 
be served. 

Chairman Lyons asked for information on how the members 
of the WMUA staff are chosen; also, what exposure to professional 
training, and about the role of the five consultants listed by WMUA 
in a document provided to the committee. 

Mr. Stadlen described the recruitment of staff, through 
various avenues of advertising, including word of mouth, the 
Collegian , and over the airwaves. There is no dearth of applicants. 
All must go through a (student operated) training period before go- 
ing on the air. Faculty advisers are nominated, invited to serve, 
and the list then submitted to vote of the students. Part of the 
new plan is to secure advisers from various departments concerned 
with broadcasting. The purpose is two-fold: (1) to provide programs 
of interest to people the station serves (2) to provide training for 
students in the broadcasting field. 

Mr. Hulsen stated that comparison with Harvard or Emerson 
was not suitable, since they are not public universities. The real 
problem is programming - the use made of public broadcast channels. 
As far as a training medium, no faculty members are involved to give 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

professional guidance. He repeated his view that, at additional 
wattage, the Trustees should consider expanded use for other more 
educational purposes. Mr. Keenan agreed that higher wattage would 
bring greater responsibilities which should be properly discharged. 
He felt that the students had the ability to handle this, but only 
with proper professional guidance. Mr. Stadlen described WMUA pro- 
gram policy, stating that a program has never been rejected because 
of its educational nature. WFCR, he said, was the prime supplier 
of educational programs. WMUA has supplied programs that were 
entertaining to students as well. 

In response to Trustee Rowland's question of whether pro- 
grams have been developed that would be suitable for a wider 
audience, Mr. Stadlen indicated the station felt no obligation to 
appeal to everyone, including, for example, housewives, within the 
broadcast range. The station is mainly interested in reaching the 
young adult, college-age population. 

The need for a study was considered. Mr. Stadlen said 
that WMUA would be willing to cooperate along these lines to assist 
in reaching their desired goal. Based on what WMUA regards as 
satisfactory past performance, the opportunity is now sought to pro- 
ceed with filing for increased wattage, as it may not be possible to 
be heard as advantageously by the FCC at a future time. 

The length of time it would take to make a study and the 
actual risk to WMUA's location on the broadcast band was considered. 
Mr. Stadlen felt a study could take weeks, or, if comprehensive, 
possibly a year. He set out the problems in such a delay as (1) the 
budget for WMUA has been allocated (2) costs of equipment will in- 
crease due to inflation; (3) the FCC has a study underway, the out- 
come of which is hard to predict, but which might bring about a 
freeze in allocation of broadcast frequencies. Mr. Ballard stated 
that time is of the essence. He urged that the application be 
filed without delay. 

Secretary McCartney expressed his concurrence with the 
Broadcasting Council vote. He stated that mature and capable people 
are managing WMUA at present, but the flux of students in and out of 
positions of responsibility is continuous, and when the station be- 
comes a public station it becomes a second voice of the University. 
This obviously will call for a professionally structured approach - 
some structure, in other words, which is not yet apparent in WMUA's 
present organization. 

Mr. Stadlen advised that the station is working on 
structure. This will include a salaried chief engineer and station 
manager. In addition, he and Engineer Ballard are sophomores and 
it is to be expected that they will be involved for another two 
years, thus supplying consistency of staff. In response to a 
question from Trustee Rowland, he indicated that the proposed pro- 
fessional staff members would not be paid from student funds. 



3313 



3314 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle commented that, as a resident of the 
campus, he could vouch for the quality of much of the programming 
on WMUA, although occasionally a student conducted himself un - 
favorably. He stated that, if the station were to reach out to 
greater public, he did not believe the Trustees would wish to be 
charged with the responsibility. He suggested greater continuity, 
more solid advice to students. The President said that WMUA pro- 
vides something which WFCR does not, i.e. athletic events coverage. 

A better system to provide improved program monitoring is 
advisable. The President noted that, although Messrs. Stadlen and 
Ballard are responsible persons, some individuals broadcasting over 
WMUA have not used the public air waves in a responsible manner. 

The visitors then left the meeting. 

Discussion was held. The effect of two large public sta- 
tions operating out of the University was considered. 

Trustee Rowland expressed the view that requirements at 
higher power in terms of kinds of programs, people and equipment, 
would bring about a situation where the students would lose the 
opportunity to be creative and might ultimately lose the complete 
direction and control of the station. 

Trustee Croce observed that, although the proponents are 
very capable students, the University Trustees must consider their 
own responsibility as license holders. 

Motion was then made, seconded and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the resolutions of the University Broad- 
casting Council with reference to a pro- 
posed increase in power from 10 to 1,000 
watts by student radio station WMUA be 
adopted (Document T69-076, attached) and 
that the ad hoc study group proposed in 
Resolution II be requested to study, among 
other things, the feasibility of a different 
organizational structure for WMUA which 
would provide for the station to hold its 
own broadcast license. 



The meeting was adjourned at>t%z 10 p.m 



II 




RobArt J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustejes 




1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

June 10, 1969, 12:30 p.m., Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Pumphret, President Lederle; 
Trustees Frechette, Gordon, Secretary 
McCartney, Treasurer Johnson. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



3315 



Chancellor Broderick, Associate 
Treasurer Brand, Trustee Lyons, 
Messrs. Ladd and Wood of Standish, 
Ayer & Wood, Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting at 1:30 p.m. He 
introduced Mr. Wood of Standish, Ayer & Wood who presented the 
recommendations of the investment counsel. He discussed the current 
"credit crunch" and termed it more severe than that of 1966. The 
University's Endowment Fund was appraised by Mr. Wood who said in- 
creases in equity participation of the endowment funds over a period 
of time would result ina a total return which would exceed that of 
fixed income securities. He predicted the end of the present cycle, 
noting that the banks are out of money and that municipalities are 
unable to borrow. 

An appraisal of the securities portfolio, with statistical 
tables indicating the relationship of book value to market value for 
various segments of the portfolio, and information on yields and 
diversification was supplied to the committee in advance of the 
meeting. In summary, the security portfolio analysis as of March 28, 
1969 had book value of $1,045,771 and a market value of $1,177,039, 
with unrealized appreciation of $131,268. Estimated annual income 
was set at $46,633, producing a yield at book value of 4.467>. 
Portfolio distribution is 37o in cash, 32% bonds, 657. preferred and 
common stocks. 

The bond portfolio diversification was reported as 
virtually unchanged since the last report and continues to be good. 
The quality of holdings was termed excellent; 807, of the portfolio 
rated AA or better. It was noted in the current period of high 
interest rates that call protection is important. This is provided 
by the substantial holdings of discount and non-refundable bonds. 



Mr. Wood stated th 
will provide greater return 
capital appreciation. Some 
be used to build up the stoc 
tion present itself. Counse 
placed on industrial rather 
in the industrial area, that 
the brightest outlook at pre 
$50,000 were suggested as re 
be increased as the size of 
number of commitments. 



at, over the long term, common stocks 
than bonds, through dividend growth and 
of the proceeds of maturing bonds may 
k position, should an attractive situa- 
1 recommended that greater emphasis be 
than utility stocks. It was said, with- 
consumer oriented stocks appear to have 
sent. Unit commitments of $25,000 - 
asonable; with a recommendation that they 
the portfolio increases to limit the 



Investment 

^ouncil 

Recommendatioi 



3316 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

No change was recommended in the Operating Fund, which is 
fully invested at present. A reduction in savings or variable 
interest accounts would provide room for change. Investment of new 
funds in short term Federal agencies, or commercial paper with a 
yield of more than 67o was considered. 

Mr. Ladd discussed the University Endowment Fund listing, 
as supplied to the members of the committee at the meeting. Dis- 
cussion was held on new issues in areas not presently held in the 
University portfolio. Mr. Ladd pointed out that, in line with the 
proposal that consumer goods category should be attractive, it is 
recommending a high grade list of issues. Mr. Ladd and Mr. Wood 
then responded to questions, indicating that the market has stood up 
extraordinarily well in the current financial crisis. Despite the 
credit crunch, the consumer will be the last to be affected. 



After further discussion, motion was made and seconded, 



and it was 



VOTED: 



To authorize the Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity, Kenneth W. Johnson, to execute 
the changes in orders in the University's 
investment portfolio as recommended by 
Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc. 



Sell 



Issue 



Approximate 
Price 



25M 
Buy 
25M 

Sell 



Federal Home Loan 6.30 6/25/69 $ 100 



Federal Home Loan 8's 6/26/70 



300 
225 



Buy 

300 

700 
400 

40(1) 
1500 



Clark Equipment 
First Nat'l Boston 
Total Sales 
Available Cash 



Continental Can 

Northwest Airlines 

Magnavox 

Baltimore Gas & Elect. 

Security Pacific 

Total Purchases 



(1.40) 
(2.90) 



100 



38 
76 



(2.20) 


70 


(0.45) 


33 


(1.20) 


49 


(1.70) 


32 


(1.28) 


39 



Market 
Value 

$25,000 



25,000 



11,400 
17,100 

$28,500 
55,981 

$84,481 



$21,000 

23,100 

19,600 

1,280 

19,500 

$84,480 



(1) Subscription to Forthcoming 1 x 10 rights offering 



331? 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson commented on the Operating Fund. From 
the middle of August to the middle of September there is a big 
build-up of funds, which could be invested on a short-term basis. 
He questionedwhtgther Participation Certificates should replace 
Certificates of Deposit and asked Counsel to recommend the best 
vehicle; 

Mr. Wood stated this was a perfectly good credit and a 
desirable way to handle these funds with a return 1/4 - 3/8 better 
than commercial paper. After further comment, the matter was left 
that when funds are available, further discussion and consideration 
will be extended to this type of investment. Messrs. Ladd and Wood 
then left the meeting. 

The need for funds for the creation of a development 
office was described by the President. In the past the Associate 
Alumni have had a virtual monopoly on fund raising, with the Uni- 
versity cooperating through provision of several staff positions, 
including a Fund Director. The results have been less than had been 
hoped. 

Within recent months the Administration has developed plans 
for inaugurating a full-fledged fund raising office, calling for a 
stepped up program in which the Associate Alumni would participate 
cooperatively. 

At a meeting held with the Associate Alumni Board of 
Directors recently, agreement was reached that their program would 
be part of the University's general development program. This matter 
is also of great interest to several Deans who strongly favor moving 
into an accelerated program. 

It is proposed that $50,000 of Trust Fund money be used on 
a preliminary basis for setting up this expanded fund raising office 
The plan calls for engaging a high calibre person to head the effort, 
together with an assistant and a secretary. These people, in turn, 
would be associated with a Development Advisory Council, composed of 
Deans, a representative of the Administration, faculty members, 
Trustees and both alumni and student representatives. The Develop- 
ment Director would provide the lead in deciding the priorities. 

More than the $50,000 sum recommended in the Trust Fund 
Budget is needed, President Lederle stated, but in the present 
stringencies, this is a beginning. 

Trustee Gordon referred to the University of Massachusetts 
Foundation, set up in 1952-53, to act as a tax exempt vehicle for 
deposit of funds contributed by Alumni and others, to the University 
He recommended that some latitude be left which would keep the 
Foundation vehicle open for use. "e expressed the hope that the 
development officer would assume a high level title to lend the 
office appropriate prestige. 



Development 
Office 



3318 



COMMITTEE 



State 

Auditor's 

Report 



Financial 
Repgrting of 
Trustees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle said the University is at a point where 
an experienced fund raiser, assisted by adequate manpower, is needed 
to spend 100% of his time providing leadership for and negotiating 
his way through these problems. 

President Lederle said that the Development Advisory 
Council would set out specifications for the man to head the program, 
as well as spell out the relationships between the various interestec 
elements on the campus at Amherst. 



After further discussion, on motion made and seconded, it 



was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that they approve creation of a 
Development Office. 

Chairman Pumphret referred to the State Auditor's Report, 
which had been supplied to the members of the committee in advance 
of the meeting. He stated this was one of the most favorable reports 
ever received by the University, and complimented the Treasurer's 
Office. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that all details in this report 
have been now taken care of. He carefully described the actions 
taken on the various items detailed in the Report of the Auditor. 

Chairman Pumphret introduced the agenda item on Financial 
Reporting to the Trustees. Treasurer Johnson exhibited sheets of 
daily IBM reports on various accounts prepared for internal Universi 
ty use. He offered to arrange to supply these to the members of the 
Board on a daily, weekly or monthly basis. He noted that these 
figures are sometimes thirty days behind, due to the amount of work 
involved in assembling the detail. After consideration, it was the 
consensus that quarterly reports would be most suitable. This will 
provide information so that it will be possible to determine the 
current budgetary situation as the year progresses. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:00 p.m 




J. Mc( 
Board of Tri( 




tees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

June 24, 1969, 11:00 a.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy; President Lederle, 

Trustees Haigis, Maginnis, Secretary 
McCartney. 



3319 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick, 
Associate Provost Allen, Acting Dean 
Gagnon, Dean Gentile, Professor Ulin, 
Dean Bischoff, Dean Dwight Allen, 
Dean Picha, Professor Glen Gordon, 
Secretary, Faculty Senate; Dr. Appley, 
Professors Ricci, Kroll, Lewis, 
VanderZwaag, Campney, Plagenhoff, 
Heronemus, Professor Weaver, UM/Boston; 
Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 11:00 a.m. He in- 
formed the Committee that the agenda included consideration of 
certain new programs and urged that they be considered in the light 
of current financial restrictions in the Commonwealth. Reference 
was made to the listing supplied of programs offering the Doctor of 
Philosophy Degree and the number of students enrolled in each pro- 
gram (fall of 1968). 

Provost Tippo reviewed the appointment by the President of 
a Committee in September, 1968 to advise him on the selection of the 
Dean of the Graduate School. Included were 18 faculty members; 
also, representatives of the undergraduate and graduate student 
senates. After due search and consideration, the Committee has 
submitted two candidates, both of whom are at present members of 
the UM/ Amherst faculty. At the request of the Chairman, Provost 
Tippo described in detail the procedure for hiring on this level and 
outlined the steps taken by the committee. 

Professor Mortimer H. Appley' s resume was briefly reviewed 
It was noted that he has been a member of the UM/ Amherst faculty for 
two years. He was then invited to join the meeting. Discussion was 
held. At the invitation of the Chairman, Professor Appley described 
his educational and academic background, as well as some of his pro- 
fessional works and experience. He then responded to question. 

Professor Appley stated that he conceived the role of 
Graduate Dean as one in which the protection of scholarship is a 
primary obligation. Graduate programs have been over-subscribed and 
in the next decade will come under a great deal of pressure. He felt 
the role of Graduate Dean was one of protection of the balance be- 
tween the creative function of the University (research) and the 
transmission of knowledge (teaching) ; to see that neither intrudes on 
the other, but that both are cherished. 



3320 



COMMITTEE 

Dean of 

Graduate 

School 

(Dr. Appley) 



Revision, 
Physical 
Education 
Requirement 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Discussion followed. After consideration and comment, 
motion was made and seconded and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the appointment of Professor Mortimer H. 
Appley as Dean of the Graduate School of 
the University of Massachusetts/Amherst 
be approved. 

A proposal for a revision of the Physical Education re- 
quirement was presented by Dean Bischoff. He described the proposal 
in some detail (Document T69-087) . The present requirement is two 
years. The student is graded, but receives no credit. It is pro- 
posed that one year of activity courses or a one semester lecture/ 
lab course be required. Two credits would be awarded in either 
case. It is also proposed that students could opt to be graded or 
to have their performance assessed on a pass/fail basis. 

In response to question, Dean Bischoff said the proposal 
to offer the courses as a choice of pass/fail or graded, is in 
order to extend the broadest possible selection and range of oppor- 
tunity to students. He stated the department has the capacity to 
enter such a program. The program has been approved by the Faculty 
Senate . 

Motion was then made, seconded and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the revision of the 
Physical Education Requirement as set 
forth in Document T69-087. 

A Proposal for a Program of Study leading to a Ph.D. in 
Human Movement was next introduced by Dean Bischoff. The faculty 
members involved in implementing the proposed doctoral program 
joined the meeting. Dean Bischoff stated that these educators 
would form a core of competency to produce a Ph.D. unique in this 
country. He briefly described the background of these men and their 
major contributions in their fields. The program will provide a new 
concept of intellectual content within the area of physical educa- 
tion. The group will bring the study of human motor activity to a 
new height. There are many physical education graduate programs in 
the United States, including those at Columbia, Michigan, Stanford, 
UCLA and Berkeley. 

Discussion was held on the title for the proposed degree. 
The Dean and members of his staff held that a degree in human move- 
ment has significance within the discipline. Dr. Campney stated 
consideration has been given this title within the school and also 
within the Big Ten. Although the term leaves much to be desired, it 
follows national usage. The term would be most meaningful to stu- 
dents who would be recruited throughout the country. 



II 



COMMITTEE 



%J<LJ/±w< J. 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor Ulin stated the Academic Matters Committee of 
the Faculty Senate recommended the program without hesitation. He 
complimented the manner in which the proposal was drawn up and 
stressed the capacity of the department to carry out the program. 
Dean Picha noted that the Engineering School feels a strong inter- 
action with the physical education program. He noted, for example, 
the significance of human engineering factors involved in the space 
program. 

Dean Bischoff said nc inordinate expense is anticipated 
since the faculty is already available. No problem is expected in 
recruiting candidates for the program. The members of the Physical 
Education group left the meeting. 

Acting Dean Gentile stated that the proposal is a good, 
solid scientific program. He drew attention to the endorsement by 
the Graduate Council and the Faculty Senate. 



Motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
a graduate program in Physical Education be 
approved leading to a degree in Human Move- 
ment as set forth in Document T69-082, which 
is hereby attached to and made a part of these 
minutes . 

A proposal for establishment of a graduate program in 
Ocean Engineering was submitted by Dean Picha of the School of 
Engineering, (Document T69-083) . Ocean Engineering is that activity 
which combines knowledge of the ocean with engineering skills to 
utilize the oceans, their contents or boundaries for the achievement 
of human objectives. The proposed program grew out of Research Pro 
ject THEMIS. Three pilot courses have received enthusiastic re- 
sponse from students. The 1500 mile coastline of the Commonwealth 
provides a wealth of ocean resources and the economy benefits from 
a highly developed ocean industry. One-fifth of the nation's 
oceanographic industry is established in the Commonwealth. To 
maintain a leading position in this industry, it is proposed that 
academic support be furnished to this program. The Stratton Report 
(a ten-year national plan for exploiting the oceans) was referred 
to as establishing its need. 

Dean Picha introduced Professor Heronemus to the meeting 
and he responded to specific questions. The six similar programs 
now established include one in Rhode Island now in its third year. 
The proposed program will be limited to 25 students. Although 400 
applications were received, no growth is presently planned. 

The Ocean Engineering program can be initiated in existing 
facilities in Amherst, with research and instruction augmented by 
field trips to coastal and ocean areas. Discussion of cost factors 
revealed that investments will be necessary for modification of 
facilities and expansion of laboratories. Funds will be necessary 



in 



Ph.D 

Human 

Movement 



3322 



COMMITTEE 



Graduate 
Program, 
Ocean 
Engineering 



Ph.D. in 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for transportation to field trip sites and cruises in oceanographic 
research vessels. Waterfront facilities will be necessary and 
possibly can be supplied at Columbia Point later in the program. 

Dean Picha said the total capital investment, spread over 
a seven-year period, would approximate a million dollars. It is 
expected that much of this investment could be secured from federal 
sources. This would educate 50 students per year in Ocean Engineer' 
ing and provide waterfron ^support for 50 students in Marine Sciences 
Dr. Heronemus stated the program at Rhode Island is financed an a 
state and federal sharing basis. Rhode Island has offered to share 
its ship TRIDENT with the University program. Cost per student 
approximates $4,000 a year, a large part of which is supplied from 
Sea Grant funds. 

Chairman Troy stated that the program was admirably set up 
and was most desirable. However, he expressed concern on the fund- 
ing. Discussion was then held on the possibility of phasing into 
the program. Ways and means of doing so are documented on page 40 
of the proposal. After thorough discussion, Chairman Troy requested 
that a budget be supplied showing the possibilities of phasing into 
the program gradually, using existing facilities and equipment. 
Dean Gentile stated that Federal funds are available for sea grant 
programs for applied research, but not for theory. Dean Picha 
stated that the program could operate modestly under Phase I through 
1971. Federal or private funds would be required and hopefully 
available for the second phase. 

Motion was then made, seconded and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the establishment of a Graduate 
Program in Ocean Engineering, subject 
to the availability of state and federal 
funds be approved. 

A proposal for a Ph.D. in Education was submitted by the 
School of Education. This proposal was previously approved in 
principle by the Committee (Document T69-084) . 

The Dean of the School of Education stated that the pro- 
posal is consistent with the new plans and programs being developed 
within the School. A grant of $150,000 has been received from the 
Ford Foundation. No additional faculty will be required. 

Dean Allen left the meeting. 

After discussion, motion was made and seconded, and it 
was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that a graduate program in the School 
of Education leading to the Ph.D. degree 
be approved as set forth in Document T69-084, 
which is hereby attached to and made a part 
of these minutes. 



COMMITTEE 



3323 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Provost Tippo submitted for consideration a proposal from 
the Department of Sociology (in consultation with the Department of 
Government) that a Chair be named to be occupied by Professor Hans 
Speier (Document T69-085) . Professor Speier is expected to join 
the faculty in the fall of 1969. 

It is proposed the chair be called the Robert Morrison 
Maclver Chair in Sociology and Government. Professor Maclver, an 
internationally known scholar, is the Liever Emeritus Professor of 
Political Philosophy and Sociology at Columbia. His distinguished 
background and accomplishments were set forth in the document. 

Provost Tippo said there are two other named chairs at 
the University. Chairman Troy expressed the hope that their 
prestige would be maintained by limiting the numbers of such chairs 

After comment, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that a chair be named for Professor 
Robert Morrison Maclver in Sociology 
and Government, and that its first 
occupant be Professor Hans Speier. 

Faculty Senate Secretary Glen Gordon and Professor Reid 
entered the meeting. 

Secretary Gordon was invited to address the meeting. He 
informed them of a resolution passed by the Faculty Senate express- 
ing concern with the treatment accorded by the Administration to 
recommendations of the Tenure and Grievance Committee. The faculty 
feel they should be primarily responsible for decisions on promotion 
and tenure. The Senate had moved that the 1966 AAUP Statement on 
Government of Colleges and Universities should be endorsed. (See 
page 12 of this document). Mr. Gordon said he expressed the senti- 
ment of the Senate in urging the Board of Trustees to adopt the 
AAUP policy on Governance. 

Chairman Troy inquired whether his comments in the May 
meeting of the Faculty and Educational Policy Committee had been 
reported to the Senate. At that time Mr. Troy indicated that a 
strong Tenure and Grievance Committee should be set up, and that it 
would then carry enormous weight. 

The Provost pointed out that the Trustee Committee meeting 
had been held after the Faculty Senate had adjourned for the year. 
Thus, the Senate did not have opportunity to learn of Chairman 
Troy's Comments. 

Secretary Gordon expressed personal sympathy with Chairman 
Troy's point of view. He stated that re-structuring of the Tenure 
and Grievance Committee was receiving consideration at the present 
time. As a result, it is expected that the Committee will have a 
clearer mandate and additional strength in the future. 



Robert 
Morrison 
Maclver 
(Hans Speier) 



Faculty 

Senate 

Resolution 

Re 
Board of 
Trustees vs 
Tenure and 
Grievance 
Committee 



3324 



COMMITTEE 



Overscale 
Appointments 
UM/ Bos ton 



UM/ Boston 
Junior Year 
in Paris 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Maginnis questioned whether the faculty really 
does have the primary responsibility in matters of appointment and 
tenure. Provost Tippo described the Board of Trustee Policy which 
clearly states that a department head should receive counsel from 
the faculty and then form his own judgment, as does the Dean of a 
School or College. Trustee Maginnis commented that much of the 
problem could have been avoided if the Grievance Committee had been 
better structured. 

The matter was left that the Committee would consider 
carefully Document T69-086 and hold further discussion at the next 
meeting. Messrs. Gordon and Reid then left the meeting. 

Chancellor Broderick then submitted two overscale appoint' 
ments for consideration. Acting Dean Gagnon was requested to make 
additional comment. 

Dean Gagnon summarized the distinguished background of the 
candidate for Professor of English, adding that he would be con- 
sidered for Chairman of the Humanities Division at a later date. 
This highly regarded scholar has had wide administrative experience 
as dean of his college and assistant to a chancellor. He is recom- 
mended by the English Department Personnel Committee for appointment 
with tenure. 

The second candidate, recommended for Professor of 
Economics, has the endorsement of the Chairman of the Department of 
Economics; also of Professors Wolozin and Powers. 

Dean Gagnon then distributed a brief report on the UM/ 
Boston Junior Year in Paris. 

At the request of the Chairman the committee then went 
into executive session for the purpose of considering a high level 
administrative appointment at UM/ Boston. It was left that this 
appointment would be reconsidered at a later date with more complete 
committee attendance. 

Motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the appointment of Professor 
Robert Hoopes as Professor of English with 
tenure, and Dr. Harvey Segal as Professor 
of Economics with tenure, both at UM/Boston. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:20 p.m and joined the Com- 
mittee on Buildings and Grounds for luncheon and meeting. 




Robert 
Secretary, 





cCartney 
rd of Trustees/ 



COMMITTEE 



1 



3325 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

June 24, 1969, 2:15 p.m., Berkshire Club Room, U of M, Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 

Trustees Maginnis, Pumphret; Secretary 
McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Trustee Troy; Provost Tippo, Chancellor 
Broderick, Associate Provost Jeremiah 
Allen, UM/A; Planning Officers Littlefield, 
UM/A and Frank O'Brien, UM/B; Professor 
Weaver, Chairman, Planning Committee, UM/B; 
Assistant Dean of Administration Gugin, 
Miss Coulter. 



Chairman Haigis called the meeting to order at 2:20 p.m. 

The Chairman stated that the main agenda item was con- 
sideration of the UM/B Master Plan. However, it would first be 
necessary to act on acquisition of the Anderson property in 
Worcester. 

After brief discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
VOTED : That, in accordance with Chapter 847 Item 
8066-98 of the Acts of 1965, and all other 
acts, authorizing the Trustees of the Uni- 
versity to acquire land, or land with build- 
ings thereon, by purchase or by eminent 
domain under Chapter 79 of the General Laws, 
for the development of the University of 
Massachusetts Medical School in the City of 
Worceser; independent appraisals having been 
made by qualified disinterested appraisers 
and filed with Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer; 
that the Trustees of the University purchase 
or take by eminent domain in fee, the property 
of Alan R. and Joan E. Anderson situated at 
382 Plantation Street, in Worcester, Worcester 
County, Massachusetts and more particularly 
described in a deed recorded June 14, 1963 at 
the Worcester District Registry of Deeds in 
Book 4377, Pages 220 and 221, and that the 
purchase price for said property be Twenty 
One Thousand ($21,000.00) Dollars, and that 
the conveyance be subject to the conditions 
and agreements as set forth in the option for 
the purchase of the said property signed by the 
said Alan R. and Joan E. Anderson. 



Anderson 
Property - 
Worcester 



3326 



COMMITTEE 



UM/ Boston 

Master 

Plan 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Committee next considered the UM/B Master Plan. 
Chairman Haigis called on Chancellor Broderick to make the pre- 
sentation. The Chancellor presented highlights of the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston Master Plan through 1980. (Document 
T69-080). He stated that this plan had been developed by the UM/B 
Faculty, adopted by the Senate on June 9, 1969, and that UM/B 
Planning Officer O'Brien and Professor Weaver, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Planning and Development had assisted in its preparation. 

In general, the plan called for use of the Columbia Point 
acreage for six colleges of two to three thousand undergraduates 
each, with five hundred graduate students attached to each college. 
The expectation is for an enrollment of 15,000 students by 1980. 
It is planned that the campus shall open in 1972 for 5,000 students 

It was pointed out that the plan calls for development of 
a college system, and that this approach will provide a basis for 
experimentation. Originally, an enrollment figure of 2,000 students 
per college was used; but, at the end of the semester, the faculty 
voted for an enrollment of 3,000. 

Professor Weaver pointed out that the 3,000 students per 
college figure grew out of a compromise between opposing faculty 
groups, some of whom wished to have complete autonomy for the 
colleges and others no colleges at all. 

Chancellor Broderick reiterated his recommendation that 
there be 2,000 undergraduates plus 500 graduate students for each 
college. He noted that it is not possible for the colleges to enjoy 
complete autonomy since the requirements for degrees must be 
established by the university as a whole and not by the individual 
college. 

In response to a query by the Chairman, Professor Weaver 
responded that the college system concept for UM/B afforded certain 
advantages including: (1) it will be possible for students to take 
more than one course under the same man, and faculty can maintain 
contact with students outside of the classroom and follow up their 
academic progress; (2) this system lends itself better to educa- 
tional experimentation. As to whether this system would be more 
expensive, Professor Weaver commented that as long as the breaking 
point comes at the 2,000 to 2,500 enrollment range, laboratory and 
classroom space should be adequate. The only increase in expense 
would involve extra administrative help for each college. 

Trustee Troy raised the question of whether the concept of 
centralization really works and is fruitful. The response was in 
the affirmative. 

It was pointed out that the departments of Physics and 
Chemistry were not in favor of the split college concept. They 
favored a single science center for 15,000 students. This led to 
the question of what would be the relationship of these departments 
to the rest of the campus. The solution was stated to be the build 
ing in to the plan of flexibility relative to the exchange of faculty 



I 



I 



I 



;32? 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

in the individual colleges with faculty in the rest of the Uni- 
versity. It was pointed out that the English departments in the 
separate colleges would look for fraternal relations with the Uni- 
versity at large. It was also noted that departments in the 
several colleges will recruit in common. This will leave sufficient 
flexibility to have the administrative machinery adapt to problems 
which develop as the institution grows. 

The President commented that the ideaof breaking down 
the monolithic university is not new. When the UM/B site was 
under consideration, this factor was taken into account, and it was 
hoped to get the academic units on one location prior to such a 
split into separate colleges. The President added that since ex- 
perimentation and innovation are invited by the structure of 
separate colleges, at least one college should have an emphasis on 
urban problems. 

Chancellor Broderick noted that there will always be 
tension between the concepts of graduate and undergraduate education 
However, the college plan favors the undergraduate side. 

Acting Dean Gagnon credited much of the original inspira- 
tion for the UM/B Master Plan to the UM/A University College Study, 
including the importance of having departments sufficiently small so 
that people can know each other. He added that the college plan 
combines the advantages of a small college conceptwith the advan- 
tages of a university-at-large. 

Trustee Pumphret queried whether an agreement on the en- 
rollment of 15,000 students by 1980 should not be determined at 
this meeting. It was also pointed out that the proposed proportion 
of undergraduate to graduate students (ratio) should be 12 and 3 
respectively. 

Trustee Troy pointed out that, on the Amherst campus, the 
proposed ratio suggests 20,000 undergraduates to 10,000 graduate 
students - a different approach based on the project demand for 
graduate study by Massachusetts youth. 

The President observed that the Amherst campus approach 
is possible "because of the going concern value of the existing 
physical plant." By 1980, UM/B should have a similar advantage. 

Trustee Troy raised the question whether provision is be- 
ing made for extra space beyond the 15,000 student enrollment. Mr. 
O'Brien responded that additional students could be accommodated 
through evening programs without an increase in space. 

Extensive discussion followed on the first phase cost of 
setting up a campus for 5,000 students by 1972. Trustee Pumphret 
raised also the question of how many buildings would be required. 



3328 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Planning Officer O'Brien responded that the price is based on a 
translation of academic planning into space requirements. Eight 
buildings will be required at a cost of approximately $150,000,000. 

After extension further discussion on what course of 
action should be pursued if less than $150,000,000 is provided for 
first phase of construction, it was agreed that the draft of legis- 
lation to proceed with the Columbia Point campus as submitted to 
the Governor should call for the full $150,000,000 required. 

General Maginnis noted that the Trustees have a mandate 
to build a University of Massachusetts campus at Columbia Point, 
and it is an obligation on the Trustees to state the cost. 

Discussion next moved to what features of the plan might 
involve self-liquidating projects. Planning Officer O'Brien 
responded that possibly the residential features, the student union, 
and food services might self-liquidate; also, possibly the garages, 
although they are presently scheduled for capital outlay. Trustee 
Maginnis queried Mr. O'Brien on the residential features of the 
plan. Mr. O'Brien responded that provision was being made for about 
five percent of the student body. 

President Lederle expressed serious reservation on this 
feature of the plan. He noted that, until recently, unions and 
dormitories have been built at state colleges on state funds. There 
remains the question of whether this should be passed on to the 
Board of Higher Education as a proposal or whether the University 
should move toward an Authority concept for UM/B as is done on the 
Amherst campus. 

The President noted that the policy issue is whether the 
situation at UM/Boston is so different that it should be handled 
differently from the same problems on the Amherst campus. He re- 
minded the Trustees that UM/Boston has been publicized as a commuter 
campus. Trustee Troy added that, tactically, it would be a serious 
mistake to advance the residency concept for UM/Boston. 

Chairman Haigis invited UM/A Planning Officer Littlefield 
to elaborate on some of the problems of moving ahead at Columbia 
Point on a tight timetable. 

Mr. Littlefield observed that the principal dilemma is, 
UM/B has a small site and expects to do a lot on it. There are 75 
buildable acres, for example, versus 250 in Amherst. Approaching 
this problem calls for decisions to be made many years in advance 
of construction. Any mixing of academic and university facilities 
has caused serious delays in the past. Architects need to be com- 
mitted immediately to expedite the process. He noted that, if the 
facilities are "split out", then you have a land density problem 
and will probably have to centralize. In any event, construction of 
3,300,000 square feet of space in eleven years is a formidable 
problem - especially since some facilities for ten years or longer 
will have to be built into the first phase. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Mttlef ield reminded the Trustees that they now face 
nine months of decision making daring which it must be decided what 
to tell the architects must go into each building. He reminded the 
meeting that, in order to open in 1972, construction would need to 
proceed almost as fast as though the project were being handled by 
the University Building Authority, whereas the BBC simply does not 
move at this pace. Additional personnel will be required, either in 
the UM/B Planning Office or in the Office of the BBC to expedite 
matters. 

As an example, Mr. Littlefield compared the new Universi 
Library and the Campus Center at UM/A. Both started within three 
months of the same date in the planning stage, but the Center, an 
Authority project, will open in seven months; whereas the University 
Library, a BBC project, is still a hole in the ground. 

Mr. Littlefield concluded that, unless the Legislature is 
committed to move fully and firmly on this project, and on a track, 
it would be impossible, in his opinion, to meet the opening deadline 
date of 1972. 



Further discussion followed, 
seconded, it was 



and after motion made and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the UM/Boston Master Plan to 1980, Document 
T69-080, which proposes (a) an enrollment of 
15,000 by 1980, and (b) an organization of 
the campus into six colleges of 2,000 under- 
graduates and up to 500 graduate and pro- 
fessional students, with central library and 
natural science facilities be approved in 
principle. 

It was further 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
VOTED : That the UM/Boston Master Plan - Estimated 
Space Requirements (Document T69-062) which 
proposes 3,300,000 square feet of academic 
and related structures, or approximately 
200 gross square feet per student for 
facilities other than those which are to be 
self-amortizing, be approved as the basis 
for site planning and establishment of estimate 
of capital costs. 

It was also 

VOTED : That the draft of legislation appropriating 
funds and authorizing acquisition of land, 
planning and construction facilities at 
Columbia Point (Document T69-079) be approved 
and that the President be directed to transmit 



UM/Boston 
Master Plan 
Columbia 
Point 



1330 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

a copy of that legislation, together with 
a copy of the vote of the Trustees to the 
Governor of the Commonwealth for: submission 
to the Great and General Court in this 1969 
legislative session. 

^t was further 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
VOTED : That the Board of Trustees instruct the 
administration of the University to 
implement the plan with a sense of urgency 
commensurate with the need for higher edu- 
cational facilities in the Commonwealth. 

Chancellor Broderick next reported that the Historical 
Trust on Nantucket Island wishes to purchase a hotel and make it 
available for academic purposes to the University of Massachusetts 
at a lease price of one dollar per year. The President commented 
that arrangements should be made at an early date to inspect this 
property. 

The Chancellor also reported that Mrs. Ullian, Chairman 
of the Capital Outlay Committee of the Board of Higher Education, 
is to arrange a discussion with Chancellor Broderick and Messrs. 
O'Brien and Littlefield at 10:30 a.m., Friday, June 27, 1969. 

President Lederle next inquired of Planning Officer 
Littlefield what would be the best means of bringing the UM/B 
Master Plan to the Board of Higher Education for their review. 
Chancellor Broderick indicated that he would communicate directly 
by letter with Chancellor Millard. It will be indicated that the 
Board of Trustees is studying funding aspects of the project. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:10 p.m. 




Seer 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

July 14, 1969, 12 Noon, Exeter Room, Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Healey, Trustees Haigis, 
Lyons, Pumphret, Troy, President 
Lederle 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick 



Mr. Roy Hamilton was interviewed for the position of 
Chief Business Officer at the University of Massachusetts/Boston. 
During the course of the discussion, there was considerable talk 
about the relationship of the Chief Business Officer to the 
Chancellor and to the Chief Fiscal Officer of the University wide 
system. It was suggested that there are two possibilities. One is 
that the Chief Business Officer in Boston report to the Chancellor 
or that he report both to the Chancellor and to the Chief Fiscal 
Officer of the system. The relative merits of both systems were 
explored. It was pointed out that the whole matter of the system- 
wide organization was under study at the present time and, there- 
fore, the committee wished to be careful not to anticipate the con 
elusions of the study group. However, it was recognized that it is 
important to appoint a Chief Business Officer in Boston as soon as 
possible. There was considerable discussion of the proper title 
for the Chief Business Officer in Boston. The title of Vice 
Chancellor for Business Affairs was suggested and again it was 
pointed out that by granting such a title, the committee might seem 
to be anticipating the recommendations of the system-wide study 
group. However, because of the importance of immediate action, it 
was decided that the term Vice Chancellor should be used. 



After consideration, motion was made and seconded, and 



it was 



VOTED : To approve the appointment of Roy Hamilton 
as Vice Chancellor for Fiscal Affairs at 
UM/Boston at a salary of $27,000 contingent 
on the passage of an appropriate salary bill. 

The committee spent considerable time discussing the list 
of candidates for honorary degrees to be awarded at Commencement 
1970. Chancellor Broderick recommended that no honorary degrees 
be granted at the UM/Boston 1970 Commencement. He prefers that 
major emphasis be placed on the graduating seniors. It was agreed 
that this procedure would be followed for the next Boston Commence 
ment but the Board reserved the option of changing this policy in 
future years. The committee then eliminated some 30 or 40 names 
from the proposed list. At a later meeting this list will be 
further condensed. The President was given authorization to write 
to a prospect for Commencement speaker. 



3331 



Vice 

Chancellor 
for Fiscal 
Affairs 



Honorary 
Degrees 



3332 



Medical 
School 



COMMITTEE 



1971 
Budget 



State 

Democratic 

Convention 

Committee 
to Select 
a President 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Reference was made to a letter from the Governor addressed 
to Chairman Healey on the Medical School. It was reported that the 
Chairman of the Board, President of the University and Dean Soutter 
would see the Governor on Tuesday, July 15, concerning the Medical 
School. 

The committee next turned to the matter of the 1971 budget 
Provost Tippo outlined the major questions which need to be faced in 
the preparation of the 1971 budget. First is the question whether 
we should take an additional 1,500 in Amherst in the fall of 1970. 
The Administration will prepare a basic budget designed to handle 
the 1969-70 enrollment (17,335 students). In a separate section, 
the Administration will present the budgetary requirements for the 
additional 1,500 students. It was agreed that early in September, 
the University will seek a meeting with the Governor and legislative 
leaders to present the problem of adding an additional 1,500 stu- 
dents at Amherst. Consideration was given to the inclusion of new 
programs in the budget. It was agreed that the budgetary require- 
ments for a Law School should be included. In addition, the 
budgetary needs for new programs in Ocean Engineering (Marine 
Science) , additional television and continuing education will be in- 
cluded. It was reported that a meeting has been arranged for 
Thursday, July 24, with the Governor at which time the proposed 
capital needs of the Boston campus will be discussed. The proposed 
budget for 1971 will be presented in broad outline at the Board 
meeting on August 11. As indicated this budget will present the 
needs for the 1969-70 enrollment at Amherst, a separate section on 
the cost for the additional 1,500 students and the cost of new pro- 
grams. After the proposed September meeting with the Governor and 
legislative leaders, the complete budget will be presented to the 
Board for approval at its meeting on September 12. 

Mention was made of the suggestion that the State Demo- 
cratic Convention will be held on the Amherst campus. It was agreed 
that if we are asked to act as host, we should do this. 

Chairman Healey brought up the question of the procedures 
to be followed in selecting the next President of the University. 
After considerable discussion, it was agreed that an ad hoc committed 
of the Board of Trustees should act as a screening committee. Then, 
on each campus, there should be established a student committee, a 
faculty-administration committee and, where appropriate, an alumni 
committee. Each one of these committees would suggest names and 
make recommendations of several candidates to the Trustee screening 
committee. It was also agreed that there should be appointed a per- 
son to coordinate all these efforts. Chairman Healey suggested that 
the Executive Committee meet at 10:00 a.m. on August 11 to give 
further consideration to these plans for the appointment of 
committees to aid in the search for a new President. Therefore, the 
informal meeting of the Board would be scheduled for 10:30 a.m. 
rather than 10:00 a.m. on August 11. 



The meeting was adjourned at 




swald Tippo 
Acting Secretary 




r 



[ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
July 15, 1969, 10:00 a.m., Sheraton-Boston Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 

Trustees Haigis , Lambson, Maginnis , 
Plimpton, Rowland. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick, 
Associate Provost Allen, Acting Dean 
Gentile, Dean Shapiro, Professor Ulin, 
Miss Coulter; also, Mrs. Burn, Miss 
Tillona; Messrs. Terence Burke, Conlon, 
Emerson, Gordon, Kaczka, Norton. 



The Chairman convened the meeting at 10:00 a.m. He in- 
vited Chancellor Broderick to discuss the recommendation for the 
Deanship at the University of Massachusetts in Boston. The 
Chancellor noted that the material supplied to the committee in ad 
vance of the meeting included most of the necessary information so 
that a detailed presentation of the case was not necessary. He 
pointed out that the recommendation had been made by two Chancellor 
an outstanding educator, and the Faculty Committee. The search for 
a Dean included initial consideration of 76 candidates; the list 
was finally reduced to 23, and after full deliberation agreement 
was reached and the recommendation, as submitted, was made. He 
briefly reviewed the accomplishments of the candidate. 

Chairman Troy invited comment. General discussion was 
held. In response to Trustee Rowland's inquiry, the Chairman 
stated it was the responsibility of the committee to vote on the 
proposal and present the results to the full Board of Trustees. 
The Board would consider the matter in executive session and arrive 
at decision by vote. After further comment, motion was made and 
seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

that the recommendation for Deanship at 
UM/Boston be approved. 

(The vote was 4 yea; two nay; one abstaining) 

Professor E. H. Emerson joined the meeting and presented 
a proposal for a four-year Honors Program for the College of Arts 
and Sciences (Document T70-001) . The proposed program, which be- 
gins in the student's freshman year, also includes seminars at the 
junior-senior level that would be valuable for superior students 
who had taken freshman- sophomore honors courses. The objective of 
the program is to challenge the able, highly motivated student to 
work at full potential under expert faculty guidance. The range 
of academic opportunity would be widened by fostering educational 



3333 



Deanship 
UM/Boston 



Honors 
Program 



3334 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

experimentation and allowing considerable curricular flexibility. 
It was held that establishment of a strong honors program would be a 
vital step in the growth of the University's academic stature. 

In response to questions, Professor Emerson said that some 
students from the other colleges in the 5-college community will be 
eligible to participate on the same basis as students from the Uni- 
versity. The program would operate harmoniously with present honors 
program. It would incorporate existing departmental programs as 
well as certain features of honors work that have proven of value in 
the University. The proposal to begin at the freshman level stems 
from the realization of the sophisticated work done in high schools 
now and the wish to attract students to the University who might not 
otherwise come; this has already proven successful. 

It is expected there will be approximately 90 freshmen in- 
volved from a total enrollment of approximately 3,000. The proposal 
provides for the waiving of University core requirements or approval 
of faculty advisors. 

Professor Emerson emphasized that the program stresses 
active, personal involvement of the student in the educational 
process. It would be administered by a Director with the status of 
a department head who would report directly to the Dean of the 
College. He would be aided by a small committee of faculty members 
from various disciplines. Staff would include faculty honors ad- 
visers, each of whom would be responsible for up to 12 honors stu- 
dents. The student-adviser relationship would be a continuing one. 

Chairman Troy commented that a great part of the success 
of the proposed plan would be dependent upon the effectiveness of 
the advisers, and that 12 students was a large number to work with. 

Professor Emerson responded with several names of outstand- 
ing faculty members who have already agreed to serve as advisers, as 
an indication of the quality of the faculty identified with the pro- 
gram. He agreed that 12 was a large number of students to advise and 
indicated that most advisers would deal with fewer students. 

In response to a question, Professor Emerson said at 
present juniors and seniors are not required to take interdiscipli- 
nary courses, but it is hoped these will be offered beginning in 
1970. He stated there is no fear of too much concentration and lack 
of breadth. 

After further comment, Professor Emerson agreed that the 
results of the program would be reported to the Trustees at the end 
of one year. He then left the meeting. 

Provost Tippo and the Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences affirmed their unequivocal support of the program. Motion 
was then made and seconded, and it was 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the Honors Program for the 
College of Arts and Sciences (Document 
T7D-001). 

Professor Zina Tillona, Associate Professor of Italian, 
entered the meeting and presented a proposal for a major in Italian 
Language and Literature in the College of Arts and Sciences at 
UM/Amherst (Document T70-002) . She reviewed the history of the 
Italian program at the University beginning with its inception in 
the late 1940' s. For the next twenty years, it was limited to a fe 
sections of elementary and intermediate courses. Enrollments in- 
creased dramatically from 74 in September 1965, to 125 in September 
1966. Three years ago the faculty consisted of one instructor; 
now there are three full-time faculty members and one part-time 
member teaching Italian, with a fourth person already appointed for 
next year and a fifth in the process of being appointed. Student 
interest has brought about the increase in offerings, and has 
stimulated growth of the faculty. The program has now come to a 
crucial point. In order to attract more qualified students to con 
tinue with Italian beyond the intermediate level, and in order to 
allow students who have indicated interest to major in this field, 
a major program must be offered. The proposal includes the addi- 
tion of seven new courses in Italian Literature and the institution 
of an undergraduate major in Italian Language and Literature. 

In response to questions, Professor Tillona stated that 
the proposed program presently involves no need for additional 
faculty. Profitable cooperation with the other four colleges in 
the valley is entirely feasible and probable. 

Professor Tillona then left the meeting. 



After consideration, motion was made and seconded, and 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the proposal for a major 
in Italian Language and Literature in 
the College of Arts and Sciences at the 
University of Massachusetts/Amherst as 
set out in Document T70-002. 

Professor Terence Burke joined the meeting and presented 
a proposal for an undergraduate major in Geography (Document 
T70-003) . He noted that there are two state universities in the 
United States without an undergraduate program in Geography; the 
University of Massachusetts is one of these. Professor Burke 
briefly reviewed the field, stating that it has been rapidly grow- 
ing in the United States in recent years because of the increased 
demand for geographers by federal, state and local government 
agencies as well as industry, the armed services, and teaching. ' 



3335 



Italian 
Lang. &. Lit. 
UM/Amherst 

Undergraduate 
Major 



Undergraduate 
Major in 
Geography 



3336 



COMMITTEE 



M.S. in 
Management 
Science 
UM/ Amherst 






UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The program is intended to provide a broad introduction to the 
methods, materials and concepts of the discipline, as well as to 
allow freedom to pursue special interests. Requirements for the 
major would include one introductory course from the lower division, 
two regional courses and two systematic courses from the upper di- 
vision and a minimum of three upper-division courses with one course 
in a directly related cognate field other than geography. Students 
would be encouraged to use course selections to reinforce their 
geographic ability, attaining a multi-disciplinary appreciation of 
those problems and regions of most interest to themselves. 

Professor Burke stated that with the addition of a fourth 
faculty member in September 1969, the teaching faculty will be ade- 
quate to support a major in 1969-70. In addition to courses propose 
and modified at present, it is proposed that Botany 226 and Geology 
360 be accepted as meeting departmental requirements. 

A table of courses in the revised and extended program was 
considered and discussed. The question of overlap was clarified. 
Dr. Burke stated that the difference lies in the point of view 
brought to bear, which is the major contribution or distinctive 
feature of the proposed program. He stated that the proposed 
changes in the program would provide a sound initial training for 
students with long-term interest in this field, "service course" 
capabilities requested by programs centered in other departments, 
and "breadth" components sought by students as electives within 
their liberal arts program. After some further comment, motion was 
made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of an undergraduate major in 
Geograph UM/Amherst as set out in 
Document T70-003. 

Professor Burke then left the meeting. 

Dean Conlon and Professor Kaczka joined the meeting and 
presented a proposal to introduce a graduate program leading to the 
degree of Master of Science in Management Science at the University 
of Massachusetts in Amherst (Document T70-004) . Dean Conlon re- 
ferred to the rapid growth of enrollment in the School of Business 
Administration. He stated a Master's degree in Management Science 
is a logical extension of the undergraduate quantitative methods 
major, and it would complement the Ph.D. program by dual use of 
courses and as a potential source of doctoral students. The 
Master's Program in Management Science would result in an even 
greater utilization of existing faculty resources and course offer- 
ings., The program would offer a degree of specialization not possi- 
ble under present programs. Two major reasons for the program were 
said to be (1) its application to problems of business and ad- 
ministration and (2) the need to improve communications between the 
technical and non- technical groups. 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Management Science is the application of scientific and 
mathematical techniques to solution of management problems in 
accord with management goals. It requires technical skills and 
understanding of management problems. The goal is to turn out 
competent management scientists. This requires both technical 
capability and management empathy. The program is designed to meet 
this goal. The program of study was reviewed as set out in Docu- 
ment T70-004. 

Professor Kaczka stated that this is not a rigid, highly 
structured program, but one which allows option to students. The 
program which is designed to take two years will draw heavily on 
other sources within the University. After question and comment, 
motion was made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of a graduate program leading 
to the degree of Master of Science in 
Management Science at UM/ Amherst (Docu- 
ment T70-004) . 

Dean Conlon and Professor Kaczka then left the meeting. 

Professor Paul Norton joined the meeting and presented a 
proposal for the degree of Master of Arts in Art History (Document 
T70-005) . Professor Norton explained that in order to encourage a 
balanced growth in visual arts within the University and to serve 
the needs of the larger academic community, as well as the demands 
in the state and national area, a program leading to the Master of 
Arts in Art History was being proposed. A graduate program leading 
to the Master of Fine Arts degree is already established; no such 
provision exists for the art history student. Professor Norton 
said it is expected that this beginning program will be the first 
step toward the larger objective of a doctoral program at a future 
time. Faculty and other resources are adequate to support an M.A. 
program, but there is no assurance they would be for a doctoral 
program. Experience will indicate this in the first few years. 
It is expected the value of the program will be enhanced by the 
cooperation of art departments of Amherst, Mount Holyoke and Smith. 
A trial period will be practical and of value in this phase also 
before advancing to the doctoral program. Professor Norton noted 
that although the library collection is adequate at present for the 
needs of an M.A. program, bolstered by the cooperation of the other 
colleges, it would be desirable not to offer the doctorate until 
the combined valley art history collection approaches the level of 
40-50,000 volumes. A small group of five to ten students can be 
accommodated at present. With the completion of the new library 
and Fine Arts building, the situation will be more attractive. 

An intermediate program, which may develop into a doctora 
program, is needed because of expansion of established museums, 
founding of new museums, rising demand for public art courses for 
adults (including evening and mail courses in art appreciation) and 



333" 



Master of 
Arts in 
Art History 
UM/ Amherst 



3338 



COMMITTEE 



Summer 
French 
Language 
Program - 
Pau 



Summer 

German 

Language 

Program 

Abroad 



LfcNrV£RS4TY OFw MASSACHUSETTS. 

the rising demand for Art History teachers. Professor Norton stated 
the vogue of travel to Europe, which has extended to persons of even 
modest income, has stimulated a need for persons properly trained to 
lead and direct tours. 



meeting. 



After responding to questions, Professor Norton left the 



Motion was then made and seconded, and it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of the Proposal for the Degree 
of Master of Arts in Art History (Docu- 
ment T70-005) . 

Dr. Barbara Burn, Director of International Programs, 
entered the meeting and presented a Proposal for a Summer French 
Program at Pau (Document T70-006) . This six-week study program 
would be of service also to students of other valley colleges, since 
no summer program is available in the French language. Pau, in 
southwestern France, utilizes the academic personnel of the French 
university system, especially the Universities of Bordeaux and 
Toulouse. The University of Massachusetts will provide only a 
Director; the instructors will, be paid by the Institute at Pau; they 
will be French. Course offerings will be available at the upper- 
division and graduate levels, with flexibility of emphasis according 
to individual need. An elementary six-credit course of study for 
beginners- in French is available, administered by the University 
Center (Institute) at Pau. Dr. Burn stated the cost to the student 
is minimal, though the facilities and quality are outstanding. One 
thousand dollars is available from departmental funds for scholar- 
ships. The Pau summer group will be coordinated with the travel 
abroad of other study groups of the University. One faculty member 
from Amherst will accompany the group to assure proper functioning 
of. the University program. 

Dr. Burn stated that the summer program at Pau could be 
useful to students who plan to participate in the UM/Boston program 
at Paris during the academic year by affording an opportunity for 
preliminary training. 

During the ensuing discussion, it was reaffirmed that all 
foreign programs must be made available to students at each campus. 
Trustee Rowland noted that the purpose of Mrs. Burn's appointment as 
University International Program Director was to insure a university 
wide program. 

Dr. Burn then described the proposal for an eight-week 
summer German Language program at Freiburg to begin in the summer of 
1970 (Document T70-007) . This program would afford an opportunity 
for students to strengthen their German so. that they could partici- 
pate in the full program at Freiburg. In addition, anthropology 
students can gain additional language proficiency, which will benefi 



3339 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

their studies and research in Germany. No other American univer- 
sity offers a summer program in German language in Germany com- 
parable on the basis of cost to student and quality, with the pro 
gram proposed. The summer program could utilize the facilities 
and staff assistance of the Atlantic Studies Institute in Freiburg. 
It is anticipated that the international travel of the students 
will be coordinated with that of the other study-abroad programs 
of the University. 

The potential interest of the other colleges in the Five 
College group has been explored, and although no commitments have 
been made, interest has been indicated. 

Dr. Albert Reh of the Department of German has been desig 
nated to be the director of the summer 1970 program. He will 
accompany the group and be responsible for supervising and ad- 
ministering the program. 

Dr. Burn then described a proposal for an Exchange Pro- 
gram with the New University of Ulster in Northern Ireland (Docu- 
ment T70-008) . The exchange program with the New University of 
Ulster is one example of the individualized international education 
program which the Center for International Education of the School 
of Education plans to develop. It is anticipated that the Center 
will organize a number of carefully structured overseas relation- 
ships which will provide students with opportunity related to their 
program of study. 

Dr. Burn stated at present few Schools of Education in 
the United States provide prospective teachers the opportunity to 
include an international experience in their doctoral programs. 
The proposed arrangement would help supply this need, and provide 
the Commonwealth with teachers who could bring in international 
dimension to the classroom. 

The program is designed to enable upper division under- 
graduates to spend one semester at the New University of Ulster, 
Northern Ireland. This University accepted its first students in 
October 1968 and expects to have an enrollment in excess of 2,200 
by 1972. The University has an Education Center which focuses on 
educational change with special reference to curriculum develop- 
ment and problems in learning. University of Massachusetts stu- 
dents will pay only a nominal fee of $100 per semester, though the 
normal semester fee for foreign students is $300. Students will 
participate in a full academic program under the guidance of the 
Center for International Education. Programs at Ulster will be 
approved at Amherst, according to standard procedures. This will 
be a pilot project and will involve six to ten students. Appli- 
cants for the program will be selected by a special committee of 
the School of Education, who will consider the candidate's academic 
record, maturity and ability to profit from the experience. The 
program will be self-supporting; no University funds are requested. 



Exchange 
Program 

New 

University 
of Ulster, 
Northern 
Ireland 



3340 



COMMITTEE 



: 



o 



Faculty 
Participation 
in University 
Government 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. George Urch, Assistant Professor, the School of Educa- 
tion, will be the Director of the program. 

Discussion was held. Chairman Troy expressed reservations 
about the desirability of a program in this part of the world. 
Trustee Maginnis supported this view, stating also that the New Uni- 
versity of Ulster was too new to be suitable for the proposed ex- 
perience. Trustee Haigis encouraged early implementation of the 
program, particularly the exchange proposal. 

Dr. Burn stated that the School of Education desired to 
offer this as an educational experience and asked Professor Ulin to 
comment. 

Professor Ulin said that the intent of the program is not 
to find another Oxford to provide prestigious scholastic education, 
but to find a different cultural setting from America, and that 
Ulster provides such a setting with special features useful in this 
type of training. The purpose is to give doctoral students a chance 
to see other institutions, other people, and thus understand them- 
selves and their own culture more clearly. The experience is educa 
tion in the broadest sense for teachers. Dr. Burn added that unlike 
Paris or London, there will not be other Americans there. 

Trustee Rowland inquired if Dr. Burn were enthusiastic 
about the program, noting that the committee must depend upon her 
investigation, knowledge and experience in this field. She said she 
was, noting that no University money is involved and stating it is a 
part of a program planned by the School of Education, and one which 
they expect to expand to other areas, citing for example French 
Canada. 

After further consideration and comment, it was decided to 
try the program for one year, at which time a report would be given. 

Motion was then made and seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval of Proposal for a Summer French 
Language Program Abroad (Document T70-006) ; 
Proposal for Summer German Language Program 
Abroad (Document T79-007) and Proposal for 
Exchange Program at the New University of 
Ulster, Northern Ireland (Document T70-008) . 

The meeting briefly adjourned for luncheon and reconvened 
to hear the Secretary of the Faculty Senate. Secretary Gordon 
stated the Senate felt the faculty were not sufficiently involved in 
long-range planning at the University and that a committee should be 
appointed to study faculty involvement in governing the University. 
The Rules Committee of the Faculty Senate considered the extent of 
the involvement; as a result resolution was formed (see Document 
T70-009), for consideration by the Board of Trustees, adopting 
policies intended to improve faculty participation in University 

decis ion-making . 



3341 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In answer to a question, Mr. Gordon indicated that the 
most radical item referred to determination of whether the depart- 
ments should have Department Heads or Department Chairmen. He 
said the thrust is that there should be Chairmen. The faculty, as 
a community of scholars, should be the governing body of each de- 
partment and the Chairman should be only primus inter pares . The 
departments should be organized so that each faculty member has 
maximum opportunity to participate. Someone must lead, recruit, 
plan for the department. In the case of a Head, the decision- 
making power of the department is with the Head; the vote of the 
faculty is merely advisory. In the case of a Chairman, the deci- 
sion-making power lies in the vote of the faculty. 

Discussion followed, during which consideration was ex- 
tended as to whether this is a general problem or a product of only 
one or two departments. Secretary Gordon indicated that the 
Faculty Senate had judged the matter, so it must be considered on 
this basis. 

Discussion was held on the difference between the acti- 
vities of a Head and a Chairman. Dean Shapiro stated most good 
Heads behave as Chairmen now, 957o of the time. 

Chancellor Broderick suggested that the Trustees move 
very slowly in moving toward a rigid structure until a genuine 
grievance makes it necessary. The key is to have the right person 
in each job. 

In response to a question, Secretary Gordon stated that 
the thrust behind the document came from the feeling the University 
would be better run by faculty involvement at all levels, and was 
not brought about because of inequities. Faculty participation at 
the policy level is desired. Secretary Gordon expressed the view 
that the Board of Trustees would benefit from closer relationship 
with the faculty. He stated the document merely asks the Board to 
cooperate in exploring; it does not say it is desirable, or that it 
should be done. The faculty is anxious to relate more to the Board 
and get their views; it does not mean they are encroaching on the 
authority of the Board. 

Chairman Troy noted that nothing appears to be radically 
changed by the document, but expressed reservations as to the de- 
sirability of spelling everything out. He suggested a review of 
the proposal at a later date, when the new UM/Boston Constitution 
will also be reviewed. The Executive Committee will study these 
documents also. 



Chancellor Broderick agreed to send a copy of the pro- 
posed UM/Boston Constitution to President Lederle and Chairman 
Healey for informational purposes, although it has not yet passed 
the Faculty or Student Senates. He noted that it is almost entirely 
an internal document and deals with different problems from those 
now discussed. 



3342 



COMMITTEE 

Proposal to 
Divide the 
College of 
Arts and 
Sciences 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Acting Dean of the College of Arts. and Sciences 
described the proposal to divide the College of Arts and Sciences. 
This proposal has been developed because of the size of the College 
of Arts and Sciences. He stated that the last three or four annual 
reports from the college -have discussed the scheme of reorganization 
and consideration of dividing the college. In May a ballot of 
faculty members resulted in i 657o vote for reorganization of the 
college as opposed to maintaining status quo; 537o voted for the 
three-college option as opposed to an alternative plan calling for 
four colleges, and another calling for six. The three colleges 
would be a College of Humanities and Fine Arts, a College of Be- 
havioral and Social Sciences and a. College of Mathematical and 
Natural Sciences. 

Dean Shapiro expressed the desire to attend a future meet- 
ing of' the committee to present a more detailed plan when available, 
He advised that the proposal is related to the former Dean's resig- 
nation so that instead of instituting a search for a new dean, the 
faculty would prefer to have three deans of the three colleges in 
accord with the proposed: restructuring. 



After general discussion, the meeting was adjourned at 



2:35 p.m. 





Robert^ A .V McCarTfney 
Secretary, /Board of Trus,< 




es 



: 



f 



I 



1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
August 6, 1969, 12:30 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT : Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 



Trustees Chandler, 
Knowles, Maginnis, 
Pumphret, Troy. 



Croce, Gordon, 
Plimpton, 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Dean Soutter, Dr. Richard Saunders, 
Medical School; E. J. Ryan, Chief 
Project Engineer; Hospital Director 
Stockwell, Associate Treasurer Brans, 
UM/ Amherst; Daniel Melley, News 
Editor, UM/ Amherst; Miss Coulter. 



A brief meeting of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds 
was gathered at the close of the combined meeting held with the 
Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. 

In the absence of the Chairman, Trustee Maginnis con- 
vened the meeting in Parlor C at 12:40 p.m. Discussion was held 
on the proposed redraft of the University Motor Vehicle Regulations 
(Document T70-012) . Four major changes in existing regulations 
incorporated in this redraft are: 

1. Inclusion of authority and duties of 
Parking Control Officers authorized 
by Section 10F, Chapter 147 of the 
General Laws of the Commonwealth. 

2. Elimination of the restatement in 
Article V - TOW-AWAY ZONE REGULATIONS 
of the illegal parking offenses which 
are listed in Article IV - ILLEGAL 
PARKING. 

3. Deletion of specific towing and storage 
fees from Article V, Section 3. (Fee 
changes vary with respect to some newer 
models of automobiles which require that 
all four wheels be off the ground in 
order that tow might be accomplished 
without damage to the vehicle.) 

4. Changes in penalties for parking viola- 
tions (Article VIII - PENALTIES) to 
provide: 

a. consistency with Town of Amherst 
penalties for like violations 



3343 



3344 



COMMITTEE 



Redraft 
Motor 
Vehicle 
Regulations 



Parking 
Control 
Officers 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

b. a more effective bookkeeping system 
in the Hampshire District Court in 
the handling of University parking 
violations. 

c. a greater deterrent to illegal 
parking by raising the penalties. 
(Over 11,000 tickets have been 
issued during the current year.) 

After consideration and on motion made and seconded, it 



was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the Board of Trustees of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts acting under 
the powers granted by Section 32A, 
Chapter 75, General Laws of the Common- 
wealth, adopt, subject to subsequent 
amendment or revision, the rules and 
regulations for the use and operation 
of vehicles used in and about the 
campus of the University and on other 
. lands of the University, as set forth 
in Document T70-012 attached hereto 
and made a part of these minutes. 

President Lederle discussed the appointment of employees 
as Parking Control Officers. He, referred to Chapter 320 of the Acts 
of 1969, effective May 21, 1969, which strikes out section 10F of 
Chapter 147 of the General Laws and substitutes the following: 

10F Appointment of Parking Control Officers 

Any board or officer authorized to appoint 
police officers in any city or town which 
accepts this section, and any college, 
university or other educational institution 
empowered by law to make or establish rules 
or regulations regulating the parking of 
motor vehicles, may appoint parking control 
officers who shall have only those powers and 
duties conferred or imposed on police 
officers by section twenty A of twenty C 
of chapter ninety. 

Section 20A of Chapter 90 is concerned with the ticket- 
issuing authority and responsibility of police officers in general 
and Section 20C with the same subject in Boston and Cambridge. 

The President stated this legislation is of great interest 
to the University and outlined the plan to assign this limited 
police function to positions already in the Security Department, 



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COMMITTEE 



3345 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

already assigned to parking control. He noted it may be necessary 
from time to time to confer this authority temporarily on other 
employees, for example during football weekends. He stated the 
intent is not to create new positions or titles, but to accept and 
exercise a degree of authority given by the Legislature. 



After consideration and on motion made and seconded, it 



was 



VOTED : To recommend to 
that the authori 
parking control 
by Chapter 147, 
General Laws, be 
employees of the 
chusetts at Amhe 
nated by the Pre 
sity. 



the Board of Trustees 
ty granted concerning 
officers, as provided 
Section 10F of the 
exercised by those 
University of Massa- 
rst who are so desig- 
sident of the Univer- 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:50 p.m. 




Rob 
Secreta 



3346 



COMMITTEE 



Procedure 
for Se- 
lecting 
President 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
August 11, 1969, 10:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Boyden, Lyons, Pumphret, 
Troy; Trustees Chandler, Gordon, 
Knowles, Plimpton, Rowland, Sweig, 
Weldon. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Provost Tipp°> Dean Soutter, 

Chancellor Broderick, Miss Coulter. 

Chairman Healey convened the meeting at 10:00 a.m. in 
Parlor C of the Statler Hilton Hotel in Boston. He stated the pur- 
pose of the meeting was to consider and develop a procedure for se- 
lecting the next President of the University. Chairman Healey pro- 
posed a plan to have an ad hoc committee of the Board do preliminary 
screening of persons considered for President. As agreed at an 
earlier meeting, Chancellor Broderick had prepared a memorandum in- 
corporating some ideas for this procedure. Copies were supplied to 
the Chairman and the President in advance of the meeting. 

Chancellor Broderick stated principles which should guide 
the selection committee included: (1) the Trustees must make the 
selection themselves and (2) they should have the advice of every 
possible constituency. The Chancellor then read his suggestions for 
procedure (Document T70-014) . 

The Chairman invited President Lederle to comment. The 
President stated the procedure outlined provided a means of in- 
volving the three campuses and that it included students in the de- 
liberations. He expressed concern about so many committees unless 
communications to possible candidates were to be channeled through 
a designated coordinating clerical assistant or faculty member, to 
eliminate any possibility of duplication or proliferation of 
approaches. Simplification of the procedure could be accomplished 
through combined meetings. 

Discussion was held pro and con the plenary session in- 
cluded in the proposed procedure. Some felt unity could be supplied 
through the coordinator without necessity for a plenary session. 
In response to the proposal that representatives from all three 
campuses compose one committee, rather than have three separate 
groups, since the President will serve the total University, the 
Chancellor indicated the inherent physical difficulty of arranging 
committee meetings for a membership so geographically separated. 
He agreed separate groups would tend to have competitive slates, 
but considered it unavoidable. 



r 



i 



334? 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

With reference to the timetable, Chairman Healey stated 
it must be fitted into the specifications of the job and location 
which are yet to be defined. The system study must be completed 
prior to the activation of the search. Any official contacts 
should be on behalf of the committee and through the secretary of 
the committee in order to eliminate unauthorized communication. 
Discussion of the appropriate body and the procedures for interview 
and selection followed. 

Provost Tippo was invited to comment. He indicated a 
Trustee committee and separate committees on each campus would be 
desirable. These would be comprised of faculty, administration and 
students. This structure would lend itself more easily to the de- 
cision-making process. The Provost recommended separate faculty 
and student committees on each campus. General discussion was held 
on the selection process and to what extent the committees should 
be involved. 

The Chairman noted the problem of securing a sensible, 
viable list. He pointed out the importance of defining the kind of 
position so evaluation can be made as to the type of person re- 
quired. He expressed the hope that these data would be available 
for use by September, so that the search could be underway by 
October. Choice of the President is basically a Trustee decision 
and cannot be shared. The various groups will be advisory in 
nature and not decision-making groups. 



Chairman Healey stated the issue: whether to have 
separate committees of types described and how to involve them in 
the selection process. After discussion, the Chairman noted a con 
sensus to arrive at a process by which the ad hoc committee of the 
Trustees would receive from the various advisory committees a mastej: 
list of names from which to select a group of ten or twelve to con- 
centrate on. 

Chairman Healey noted that a plenary session at the early 
stages might be acceptable, but expressed concern that discussion 
of individual qualifications and personalities at a final screening 
stage in plenary session could lead to breaches of confidence and 
would be undesirable. 

The matter was left that the Chairman would appoint an ad 
hoc committee, apart from the Executive Committee, which will de- 
termine procedure. A meeting of this committee will be held in ad- 
vance of the regular meeting of the Board of Trustees in September. 
A copy of Chancellor Broderick's Draft of Procedure (Document T70- 
014) will be supplied to the ad hoc committee as a starting point. 



The meeting was adjourned a 



25 a.m. 




Robert/!/. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trusty s 




3348 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE AD HOC COMMITTEE TO ADVISE ON 
SELECTION OF A PRESIDENT 

September 5, 1969, 12:45 p.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, Mass, 

PRESENT : Chairman Maginnis, Trustees Crowley, Knowles, 
Plimpton, Rowland, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick, Miss 
Coulter- 



Chairman Maginnis convened the meeting at 12:45 p.m. He 
stated the purpose of the meeting was to draw together a general 
plan of operation to discharge the responsibilities of the "Ad Hoc 
Committee to Advise on Selection of a President." For ease of refer 
ence it was agreed after discussion to abbreviate the name of the 
committee to Trustee Committee to Advise on Selection of a President 

The responsibilities of the committee were defined. In 
summary, the responsibility of the committee is to obtain from the 
academic community the names of individuals including their records, 
who might be considered suitable as President of the University of 
Massachusetts. 

Chairman Maginnis said that a faculty member would be 
appointed to assist the committee. This would insure that all in- 
formation would be uniformly channeled. It was stated that several 
hundred names might eventually be submitted for possible considera- 
tion. 

Dr. Tippo described the academic and professional backgrouni 
of Dr. Charles Page, professor of sociology, in terms of his fitness 
to work with the committee as staff coordinator. After discussion, 
it was then moved and seconded and 

VOTED : To appoint Professor Charles H. Page as staff 

coordinator (part-time) to the Trustee Committee 
to Advise on Selection of a President. 

Chairman Maginnis described the procedure for setting up 
committees of several constituent University groups which will be 
asked to participate by suggesting names of persons to be considered 
for President. The following groups will be asked to form advisory 
committees to recommend names: 

Alumni Association - Amherst 

Alumni Association - Boston 

Faculty & Administration - Amherst 

Faculty & Administration - Boston 

Student Body, Undergraduate - Amherst 

Student Body, Graduate - Amherst 

Student Body - Boston 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was stressed these groups would be cooperating bodies 
only to advise the Trustee committee, also that direct and personal 
approaches to potential candidates should be made only by the Chair- 
man of the Trustee committee and that the final selection of a 
President will be made only by the full Board of Trustees. It was 
re-emphasized that, at the previous Board meeting, the principle 
was established that no contact with prospective candidates should 
be made except through the Chairman of the Trustee committee. 

Chairman Maginnis read a draft form of a letter to be 
directed to the organized groups of the University community from 
whom suggestions will be requested. 

At the request of the Chairman, Chancellor Broderick 
supplied copies of a memorandum he had drafted on suggested pro- 
cedural steps for securing a new President (Document T70-015) . 
Discussion followed. 

It was agreed to proceed on the basis of eight (8) sepa- 
rate committees, rather than one University system committee. The 
Amherst faculty-administration committee is to have 11 members: 
8 faculty members selected by the Faculty Senate, 1 dean selected 
by the deans, 1 department head selected by the department heads, 
and the Provost. 

The Boston faculty-administration committee is to have 7 
members: 5 faculty members selected by the Faculty Senate, 1 depart- 
ment head selected by the department heads, and the Chancellor. 

The Worcester faculty-administration committee is to have 
5 members: 3 faculty members selected by the faculty 1 department 
head selected by the heads, and the Dean of the Medical School. 



3349 



Each of these three committees is to elect its own chair- 



man. 



It was noted again that these committees will not approach 
the candidate, but will submit names for consideration by the 
Trustee committee and subsequent follow up, if deemed appropriate, 
by the Chairman. 

The possibility of inclusion of representatives of other 
areas on campus, i.e. Finance, etc. was discussed. 

Motion was then made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : That the Trustee Committee to Advise on the 
Selection of the President recommend to the 
full Board there be established eight (8) com- 
mittees as specified above and that the faculty- 
administration committees have the composition 
stated above. 



3350 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was agreed that a statement of guidelines to be sent to 
the eight advisory groups will be reviewed by the Chairman next week 
and sent along with a letter of invitation to formulate the advisory 
groups after clearance by the full Board of Trustees on September 12 

Trustee Plimpton presented a list of twenty names, plus 
one additional name, of potential candidates for President. The list 
and single vitae will be duplicated and supplied to the members of 
the committee. Secretary McCartney reported that he had received a 
vitae from Trustee Pumphret and another suggestion from off-campus. 
This material will also be duplicated and provided to the committee. 

Brief comment and, consideration was held on guidelines and 
criteria. Chairman Maginnis noted that, in the interest of accelera 
tion, it is expedient to move ahead with plans as outlined. Provost 
Tippo agreed to try to secure a decision from the proposed committee 
staff coordinator (Dr. Page) by Monday, September 8. It was stressed 
that the coordinator must be a person knowledgeable in University 
circles and absolutely discreet. It was agreed that secretarial 
assistance would be provided to the coordinator. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:45 p.m. 





Robert J. McCartney/ 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 




UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 



September 8, 1969, 9:30 a. 



m. 



Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston, Mass, 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



3351 



Chairman pro tern Rowland, President 
Lederle; Trustees Croce, Knowles, Troy, 
Snowden; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Chancellor Broderick, 
Dean Field, Miss Coulter; Dr. Robert 
Gage; from the Student Senate: Bruce 
Balboni, Patricia Beharry, John DuBois, 
Robert Kentfield, Patricia Mahoney, 
John Messenger, Cynthia Olken, John 
O'Rourke, Pamela Pepper, John Tierney 
and Paul Brubacher. 



In the absence of the Chairman, Trustee Rowland was 
appointed Chairman pro tem. The meeting was convened at 10:00 a.m. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Dean Field briefly re- 
viewed the agenda for the meeting. He then asked the Student 
Senate Vice President, Miss Cynthia Olken, to comment on the first 
agenda item: "Suggestions for Modifications in Policy on Residence 
Hall Visiting Hours." (Document T70-016) . 

A report of the Student Life Committee included a compi- 
lation of the results of a questionnaire completed by the presidents 
of the residence units concerning their visiting policies for the 
fall semester. 

A Report of the Open House Subcommittee (1968-69) included 
recommendations for changes in the Open House Policy, resulting 
from the questionnaire. Miss Olken said the study demonstrated 
that the residence hall visiting policy in effect during the past 
year had worked well. The Student Life Committee now recommends 
deletion of the parental permission and guest registration require- 
ment, also dormitory and corridor autonomy to establish visiting 
hours. Due to variance of opinion within the residential units as 
to the desirable length for visiting periods, corridor autonomy was 
felt to provide a way to respond to the different desires of studerts 
A student could thus select a corridor with a policy suitable to his 
needs . 

Miss Patricia Beharry, Secretary to the Student Senate, 
stated that the importance of dormitory autonomy was discussed at a 
meeting in the spring. Experience has proven that residence hall 
units can make determinations on their own. She stressed the im- 
portance of people who are involved making their own decisions. 
Miss Beharry noted that under the proposed plan it would be possible 
for various sections of a residence hall to have different policies; 
that the hours could be extended without restriction, seven days a 
week. 



Residence 
Hall Visiting 
Hours 



3352 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

During the course of discussion it was clarified that no 
one would be at the reception desk during extended hours, although 
the dorms are locked at closing time. Guests, in such an event, can 
be admitted if desired. 

The President referred to the incidence of strangers 
entering residence halls during the nighttime, with a consequent 
security problem. Miss Beharry agreed that under current rules, 
evasions are practiced by having doors propped open after closing. 
She stated this would be eliminated if students were allowed to ad- 
mit invited guests, and had to assume responsibility for them. 

In response to question, Miss Olken stated that views in 
favor of modified visiting hours represented the consensus of stu- 
dents in the various residence halls. Mr. Kentfield, Chairman of 
the Student Matters Committee, felt there was no consensus about 
what open house policy should be, but that a consensus does exist 
about dormitory autonomy. Miss Olken stated a majority vote is re- 
quired to establish the policy and that voting is held monthly. A 
campus-wide referendum will be held in October. The Dean indicated 
it would show that the students wished dormitory autonomy. 

Dean Field said he had opposed the concept of total 
autonomy, but approved increasing the visiting hour limits, pending 
additional experience prior to any major modification in the present 
visiting policy. Limited changes which would allow greater flexi- 
bility in working with the Student Senate and area and house govern- 
ments were considered avisable. Some of the areas in which latitude 
was sought were (1) simplified system of controlling guests rather 
than guest registration (2) extension of hours when approved by 
residence unit (within present security limitations) (3) possibly 
different hours for different parts of residence halls wheee 
practical (4) modification of procedure by which visiting policy is 
approved. 

Trustee Snowden inquired where the responsibility lay for 
security; what the implications were; what the students felt about 
this subject. 

Miss Olken responded that within the manner in which the 
system and the student judiciary are set up there is no police force 
enforcing regulations. Either the student turns violators into the 
judiciary or they turn themselves in. She expressed the view that 
it is entirely up to the individual, an honor system. Trustee 
Snowden stated that her greatest concern involved intrusion by out- 
siders rather than students. Mr. Kentfield said the Student Senate 
may have passed over this question of security because of its larger 
interest in male-female interactions. He said the penalty is the 
same whether one sees a girl in her room or steals a TV set, and he 
expressed reservations about imposing social restrictions because of 
the possibility of damage to property or felonious assault. 

During the course of further discussion, Dean Field stated 
that the situation during the summer was not good due to efforts to 
use the same system employed in the winter. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



3351 



o 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In response to question related to the guest register, 
Miss OLken stated that each residence hall would establish its own 
open house procedure including a policy on maintaining a guest 
register. She stated that this would conform to the concept of hous£ 
autonomy established by a majority of students in residence. 

Discussion was held on what would be considered objection- 
able behavior and the manner of handling it. Miss Beharry stated 
this matter has been considered by the students in self-government 
discussions, but as yet no regulatory process has been established. 

The question of parental permission was discussed. Miss 
Olken stated this was felt to be adivsalbe for freshmen under 21, 
particularly since it creates diaglogue between parents and child. 
The beneficial effect on freshmen of interaction with upper classmen 
was described by Mr. Kentfield who said this puts responsibility on 
the older student for the younger student. 

Discussion reverted to consideration of the security prob- 
lem. Mr. Kentfield stated that as dormitory autonomy progresses, it 
is hoped some sort of tenancy would emerge whereby students would 
assume responsibility for the dorm and its physical property. The 
more autonomy, the more responsibility students will assume, he said 
citing the case of damage to cigarette machines, etc. 

Dr. Gage expressed concern for the increasing impact on 
the campus of persons who do not belong to the community and are not 
part of the student body. He noted the increasing difficulty in 
identification and the case of intrusion into dormitories by tran- 
sients and hitchhikers. The need for additional security was 
stressed. v Iiss Olken stated this problem had been discussed within 
the dormitory. The girls felt secure once the door was locked and 
only those persons admitted who were established as legitimate visi- 
tors. Dr. Gage noted that no adverse effect on student health had 
been caused by the removal of the curfew. 

In response to Trustee question, as to function and re- 
sponsibility of staff who live in the dormitories, Dean Field stated 
they feel it is their purpose to establish climate. Mr. Brubacher 
stated the staff in residence halls tries to be a part of the 
community. 

President Lederle commented that this is not just a student 
world; the taxpayers provide funds; parents provide opportunity. The 
administration is not the bete noir. An awareness of public rela- 
tions with the Legislature and others is necessary in order to gain 
support. We live in a bigger world than just a world of students. 
The laws and police enforcement of them must also receive considera- 
tion. 

Miss Beharry expressed her support of the proposal for 
dormitory autonomy, but felt it should not be f ractionalized down to 
corridor autonomy. 



3354 



COMMITTEE 



Policy on 
Alcoholic 
Beverages 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Du Bois adjured that the lesson to be learned from 
last year's experience was that student leadership must be listened 
to when it speaks. 

Miss Olken noted that, as Vice President of the Student 
Senate, she must answer to 16,000 students on campus; their support 
is dependent on their confidence. 

Chairman Rowland afforded everyone an opportunity to speak 

to this issue. The meeting then advanced to discussion of the 

second agenda item: "Proposal for Change in Policy on Alcoholic 
Beverages." 

Professor George Goddard who served on the Alcohol Bever- 
age Committee, 1967-68, reviewed the findings of that committee. 
The University's alcoholic beverage policy has been extensively 
studied and discussed for several years. The state statutes have bee. 
thoroughly examined. The greatest concern is the conduct associated 
with use of alcohol, and not alcohol per se. No policy can be 
established contrary to the existing state statues. As a result of 
a meeting held in the spring, a proposal was formed (see Document 
T70-017) which puts the responsibility on the shoulders of the stu- 
dent, recognizing that students can be responsible individuals. The 
proposal relates the state statutes to the individual. 

Discussion was held on the application of the various pro- 
hibitions and regulations, these included sale to minors and storing 
alcoholic beverages for sale. 

The Dean of Students' Office recommends adoption of the 
Student Affairs Committee report which embodies a new alcoholic 
beverage policy. . The report recommends a change rescinding the pre- 
sent Trustee policy prohibiting all alcoholic beverages in residence 
halls and substituting a statement of the laws of the Commonwealth, 
with regulations concentrating on student behavior, storage, sale or 
use of alcoholic beverages within the residence hall and consumption 
of same on campus ways and grounds and in administrative and class- 
room buildings. 

Dr. Gage, Director of University Health Services, was 
asked to comment. He said the responsibility of his department is 
to provide information; drinking is an individual student problem. 
He felt there was use of liquor on campus, but very little actual 
alcoholism. Any problems would be social and not medical or health 
problems. Education is the answer - not restriction, he said. 

Dean Field noted that the University is the only education- 
al institution in the valley adhering to the current code. He ex- 
pressed willingness to file a complete document with the Alcoholic 
Beverage Commission at the appropriate time. Student Senate Presi- 
dent Balboni said it is a matter of student responsibility. The 
students can enforce the rules and will assume the responsibility. 
He stated that a Rathskeller should be available at the Student 
Union. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle noted that if the current age rule of 
21 years were changed, it would eliminate a great deal of the prob- 
lem. He suggested the students gather their colleagues before 
December 1, (filing deadline for new legislative bills) and face 
into the issue at the legislative level. 

General and thorough discussion ensued. The President 
pointed out that students must learn that they will be subject to 
the law of the state. Violations will not be the problem of the 
University. 

The Chairman invited comment. Miss Olken said the policy 
proposed is clear. Miss Beharry agreed, asserting that the students 
are responsible as citizens to conform to state regulations. 

In response to the Provost's query as to the effect of 
extreme behavior because of the use of alcohol, Mr. Kentfield 
stated that damage to property and noise would be handled by the 
usual judiciary process; the fact a student was drunk would be aside 
from the consideration. 

Chairman Rowland moved on to agenda item three: "Sug- 
gestions for Change in the Picketing Code." (Document T70-018) 
It was noted that the Student Senate passed a variation in the pre- 
sent picketing code last spring. This is basically different from 
the code adopted by the Board. The Faculty Senate has not had 
opportunity as yet to review the student proposal, or to present 
their recommendations. 

President Lederle suggested that the appropriate procedure 
would be for the faculty and student groups to join in consideration 
of this matter and come forth with some common language. Mr. Kent- 
field agreed. He affirmed student willingness to do so. Messrs. 
Kentfield and Balboni agreed that "outsiders" should not be allowed 
within the classroom. 

Chairman Rowland suggested that the Provost and the Dean 
join with the Faculty Senate and Student Senate and arrive at a 
recommendation. 

The Chairman next introduced discussion of the "Proposal 
that Greenough Residence Hall Be Occupied by Men and Women on Segre- 
gated Floors (Document T70-019) . 

Mr. Tierney stated the plan provides an answer to the in- 
creasing student interest and ability to direct their lives. The 
proposal would also solve the security question, referred to earlier 
in the meeting. Security is dependent on the citizens of a town; 
this plan would supply the opportunity to interact and feel responsi 
bility for others. The plan as proposed would reduce the masses to 
smaller groups, make people individuals, provide a sense of community 
a sense of belonging. Privacy is asS ured since male and female stu- 
dents will live on separate corridors. Mr. Tierney referred to the 
report of research conducted at Stanford University (Document 
T70-020) which indicated very favorable results. 



3355 



Picketing 
Code 



Coed 
Dormitory 

Greenough 



3356 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Discussion followed and consideration was extended as to 
whether, in accord with the theory, Greenough was a suitable loca- 
tion. Miss Olken supported the selection of Greenough as the place 
to begin. Some dormitories have rejected the plan, but Greenough 
would be a complete entity and entirely appropriate. 

Trustee Snowden inquired about the impact on black students, 
seeking their own identity. Mr. Tierney explained this is a sepa- 
rate situation of people seeking a sense of identity among them- 
selves. Six black students have applied for inclusion in this pro- 
gram for next year. Three blacks and three white students will 
serve on Mills House. 

Trustee Troy asked what the impact on education would be 
and intellectual independence. Mr. Tierney stated the research of 
experience on other campuses indicated the level of conversation is 
higher intellectually and more topics are discussed. Two hundred 
campuses throughout the country have similar plans; 20 of whom were 
listed, and included: Michigan State, Tufts, Michigan, Antioch, 
University of California at Davis, University of Kansas, Stanford 
and Rochester. 

The parents of the girls and men who expect to occupy 
these dormitories have been approached and are in full support of 
the arrangement. Miss Pepper stated it is planned that meetings of 
all parents, 1 students and administrators will be held before assum- 
ing residence. 

Provost Tippo noted that one letter opposing the plan has 
been received by the administration and Trustees. 

Mr. Balboni stated letters had been sent to all parents 
and only one negative reply had been received. 

Dean Field noted that the group has worked very hard on 
this project and the he originally opposed the initial project, as 
he felt there were other campus priorities. He stated, however, he 
felt some such arrangement is inevitable. 

President Lederle stated the importance of discussing 
these matters within the family. 

Trustee Snowden commented that this is a very adult atti- 
tude where the parents are consulted. The students are in effect 
saying the parents are human beings whose feelings are being con- 
sidered. 

The meeting recessed for luncheon during which the Trustees 
and Senate President Balboni and Vice President Cynthia Olken con- 
tinued discussion. 

In summation, Chairman Rowland called for individual com- 
ments on the proposed modification in policy on residence hall 
visiting hours. 



><3D f 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After full review and comment and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

approval in principle of the student pro- 
posal of self-determiniation of visiting 
hours and other visiting regulations for 
dwelling units, with the provision that 
before implementation acceptable plans for 
security of person and property be developed, 
approved by the administration, and that 
written parental permission be required for 
freshmen under 21. 

Chairman Rowland asked for comments on the proposal for 
change in policy on alcoholic beverages. Consideration was given to 
(1) rescinding the present statement of discipline code, with refer- 
ence to alcoholic beverages and (2) recommendation that the code of 
student conduct be modified in accord with recommendations of Facult 
Senate Committee on Student Affairs which states essentially that 
students are bound by the laws of the Commonwealth (3) a "21" room 
be approved, subject to filing ABC and appropriate agencies. The 
final version has not yet been reviewed by counsel. After due con- 
sideration and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the present policy on Alcoholic Beverages 
(II g Code of Student Conduct; Handbook 
1968-69) be rescinded and the policy sub- 
mitted (Document T70-020) be approved in 
principle, pending review by counsel. 

Suggestions for changes in picketing code were reviewed. 
The matter was left that it be referred to the Faculty Senate, with 
the recommendations a joint committee be set up and differences re- 
solved, for subsequent presentation to this committee. In the mean- 
time the Faculty Senate Picketing Code is set out in the handbook. 
On motion made and seconded, it was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the proposed Student Senate Picketing Code 
be referred to the Faculty and Student 
Senates with the suggestion that a joint 
commission be established to resolve the 
differences and that any proposed changes 
be referred back to the two Senates and 
eventually to the Board of Trustees. 

The proposal that Greenough House be a coeducational resi- 
dence hall was reviewed. It was agreed that written permission of 
parents would be a prerequisite and that meeting would be held with 
students, parents, administrators and Trustees present. In addition 
there must be agreement of present residents at Greenough. Provost 
Tippo recommended that one of the two parents must attend the meeting 
planned. It was suggested that alternate dates be established to 
provide flexibility. 



Proposed 
Alcoholic 
Beverages 
Regulations 



Picketing 



Coed 
Dormitory 

Greenough 



3358 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After general discussion and comment and on motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
effective the second semester 1969-70 the 
proposal to have Greenough residence nail 
occupied by men and women on segregated 
floors be approved with the provisions (1) 
that there be written parental permission 
for any student under 21, (2) that there 
be student involvement with their parents, 
administration and some Trustees to discuss 
the entire proposal, and (3) that all pre- 
sent Greenough residents give their approval 
to the proposal* 

The meeting was then adjourned. 



I 





Robert J. McCar 
Secretary! /Board of Trus 




es 



I 



L 



335i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

September 12, 1969, 9:00 a.m., Gardner Room, Sheraton Boston Hotel 

Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Knowles, Maginnis and 
Pumphret, Treasurer Johnson Secretary 
McCartney. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Croce, Frechette, 
Healey, Rowland and Troy; Provost 
Tippo, Chanceloor Broderick, Vice 
Chancellor Hamilton, Dean Gagnon, 
Planning Officers O'Brien and Prince 
of UM/Boston; Assistant Dean Gugin, 
Budget Director Morrell, Consultant 
Pietro Belluschi; Messrs. Sasaki, 
Alexander and Minervino of Sasaki, 
Dawson, DeMay Associates, Inc. 

The meeting was called to order by Chairman Haigis at 
9:10 a.m. 

At the invitation of the Chairman, Chancellor Broderick 
reported that the legislation for implementation of the University 
of Massachusetts at Boston at Columbia Point had passed, but not 
quite as originally drafted (Document T70-021) . All reference to 
the University Building Authority was lost, so no self-liquidating 
projects under the Authority are included at this time. 

The Chancellor noted that Hale Champion, Administrator of 
the Boston Redevelopment Authority, indicated in a meeting on 
August 4 that the City of Boston wished to retain acreage at the 
northeast corner of the Columbia Point site for housing development 
purposes. This land was scheduled to be taken by the University 
under legislation then about to be filed. A request was made that 
the University relinquish its claim to this area (approximately 20 
acres roughly north of the sewer easement line on the acquisition 
map) , otherwise the City of Boston would oppose the legislation 
about to be filed. 

Compromise legislation was worked out by Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton. It's essence: if the City found a private developer 
within three years of the date that the legislation passed, the Uni- 
versity would release the approximately 20 acres and convey them 
back to the City. However, the City failed to get this in, and the 
University bill passed minus the amendment. Currently, the City of 
Boston is still calling for an agreement with the University, but we 
are not now bound. The Chancellor read a draft of a letter to Mayor 
White pointing out that, although the original amendment did not 
pass, the Trustees and administration, be interested in the adjacent 



UM/Boston 

Columbia 

Point 



3360 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

community, are always ready to discuss this matter. It was noted 
that the City of Boston has a commitment to further housing con- 
struction at Columbia Point, and President Lederle pointed out that 
we should be sympathetic to any future request to convey land since 
we are deeply committed to working with the adjacent community. The 
Vice Chancellor pointed out that, if we did not take these acres at 
present, the University would be left with approximately 50 acres of 
dry land. 

Planning Officer O'Brien noted that the University had re- 
quested $150,000,000 and gotten $50,000,000. Also, the Legislature 
has set a limit of capital expenditures at $355,000,000. In order 
to expedite construction,, the University had requested freedom from 
state operating procedures, but this was not forthcoming so it is 
probable that the present schedule cannot be met. 

Also eliminated was the transit link to Columbia Station. 
Earlier studies had pointed out that the prime value of Columbia 
Point as a campus site could be realized only by having a good tran- 
sit link to the MBTA line. Mr. O'Brien queried whether the Uni- 
versity should go back to transit funds in a fiscal 1970 deficiency 
request, or in the capital outlay request for 1970. 

The planning office has been in touch with the Department 
of Transportation, which is short of funds; however, they will agree 
to funding a technical study. This would be on a one-third/ two-thiiri 
matching basis. It was suggested that the University apply to the 
Department of Transportation and, at the same time, seek our share 
of matching study funds at the state level. 

Mr. O'Brien noted also that all items in the legislation 
which would be covered by the University Building Authority were 
also turned down. 

The following schedule of costs on self-liquidating ele- 
ments in the project was projected: 

Student Union - capital charges (exclusive of dining 

services) - $50/year. 
Dining costs - (now in capital outlay) - approximately 

$3.00/day. 
Housing - no estimate on cost per day. 

All of the above items should now be requested under 
capital outlay. 

Mr. O'Brien continued that a traffic analysis called for 
an interchange with Morriseey Boulevard. However, this was cut out 
by the executive department, restored by the Legislature and assigned 
to MDC. Needed now is a definition of the limits of responsibility 
as between the University and MDC. 

The Bureau of Building Construction has discussed in depth 
the proper staff support necessary to carry out the Columbia Point 
project. The existing legislation approves hiring of additional 



3361 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

personnel; but there is a question whether this will be effective. 
Mr. 0' Briens report that boundary changes were made when the legis- 
lation was reviewed by the Executive branch: 

1. The pumping station must remain open or be re- 
placed, and this area excluded from takings 
until the City of Boston and the MDC agree 
that the facility is not needed for sewage 
removal . 

2. Boston College High School has discussed the 
possibility of moving its operation, but there 
is no conclusion. The legislation requires 
that no part of the $50,000,000 appropriation 
be spent to acquire this facility. There has 
been a significant change in the matter of 
fill. Clearance must be obtained from the 
Department of Public Works in order to re- 
place fill. The conditions set are identical 
with those established for Bird Island for the 
airport. A riprap wall must be installed and 
no fill containing refuse or wood may be used. 
Thus, the University is left with a number of 
possibilities: (a) to carry on further dis- 
cussions with DPW, (b) to move refuse off the 
site (the cubage is substantial) ; also, there 
remains the problem of where to deposit the 
refuse; or, simply leave it on the site and 
let fill settle around the buildings. 

On the question of the transit link, Trustee Pumphret 
queried whkther MBTA had been asked whether they would provide it. 
He felt it would be better if they handled it so that the University 
could "stay in education, and get out of transportation." Discussion 
followed on union problems, vandalism in the area, etc. 

President Lederle was not optimistic that MBTA would re- 
spond favorably. Mr. Hamilton noted that the MBTA puts a very low 
priority on this link, saying in effect, "you do it." Treasurer 
Johnson urged filing legislation to have the MBTA handle this problem, 
noting that the Budget Office of the Executive Branch felt that the 
University should not be in the transportation business, which was 
why they knocked out the request. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton proposed that representatives of 
the Board of Trustees sit down with representatives of the MBTA 
board to discuss a viable solution to this problem. It was agreed 
that this course of action would be taken. 

Mr. O'Brien next turned to a review of the Master Plan for 
UM/Boston at Columbia Point to date. Chairman Haigis invited repre- 
sentatives of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay, Inc. to make a slide presenta- 
tion. Mr. Kay Alexander of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay, Inc. said that 
his presentation would be a progress report on Phase IV. 



3362 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Phases I - III embraced site evaluation, including sub- 
surface explorations , also, reviewing the educational plan and site 
data. Phase IV relates to the Development Concept. 

A series of 15 slides were shown in rapid review. These 
portrayed the advantages and disadvantages to the site, as well as 
specific lines of demarcation for areas to be utilized including 
newly filled acreage. During the next ten days a series of seven 
borings will be taken to record sub-surface conditions, provide 
samples of the strata, and define the water table, etc. There is a 
possibility that the 150 foot construction height ceiling imposed by 
the FAA may be eased to permit construction up to 250 feet above 
grade. 

Mr. Alexander said that Stage one would embrace 407o of the 
program, with lesser phases to be handled over the next ten years. 
Included will be two colleges and one-half of the Science Center. 
There will be a parking program for each stage. Certain elements 
should not be more than three levels removed from a pedestrian con- 
course. 

With reference to horizontal circulation, the major move- 
ment is between the colleges themselves. It is estimated that 
approximately 200 students per college will circulate between class 
changes, and 150 students per college during the 10-minute class 
change circulating to the library. 

The parking demand for each of the six colleges is approxi- 
mately equal, except for services and physical education. At the 
Fine Arts building more parking than program space will be provided. 
In toto, there will be approximately 50 acres of parking based on 
6,000 space demand. (This figure is based on availability of a 
transportation link to MBTA, with about 507» of the students using 
it.) It is clear, incidentally, that surface parking could not 
possibly accommodate 6,000 spaces. 

Mr. Alexander's display showed approximately 70 acres 

available, including part of the BC High School land, excluding the 

pumping station and an easement. (There are approximately 40 acres 
on the BC High land in both parcels) . 

Grade elevations will vary between 20 and 30 feet. Slides 
showed the maximum fill line agreed to; approximately 500,000 cubic 
feet of fill will be required initially. There will be a need to 
import about 200,000 cubic yards. Maximum space availability is 
approximately 90 acres. Community oriented facilities (Administra- 
tion, Fine Arts, etc.) will be constructed close: to Morrissey Boule- 
vard. The northeast quadrant of the site would be used temporarily 
for recreation. Graduate and professional schools may grow at the 
west end later on (new Administration and Fine Arts) . It was noted 
that traffic between the colleges in this projection does not exceed 
the class change interval, but does approach it. 



r 



i 



i 



3363 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The approach road at the entrance to the campus is planned 
for six lanes, with two of the center lanes reversible during peak 
hours. A full fledged grade separated interchange is planned at 
Morrissey Boulevard where it intersects with the University entrance 
road. 

Slides projecting the possible placement of buildings on 
the site were shown by Mr. Minervino. One plan showed a general 
parking area with some parking available next to the colleges them- 
selves. Placement in this plan called for a five to six minute 
interval at class interchange. The plan displayed core facilities 
(library and science center) surrounded by groups of colleges in 
pairs at the south, east and northeast; student services, administra 
tion and fine arts would be located on the west quadrant. 

Another slide showed the circulation of traffic within the 
site, with open ended design permitting possible westward expansion 
and private development possibilities to the north. The projection 
showed construction with six to eight-story height limits, but this 
is tentative. Individual architects may come up with their own 
solutions. Also, a two-level, 1,000 car parking structure had 
hostels straddling the service road which goes around the perimeter. 

It was pointed out that, by nature, UM at Boston must be 
compact. Trustee Troy queried whether parking for students would be 
free. It was pointed out that, under its Building Authority con- 
struction, a $3.00 a day per student fee would be required; there- 
fore, it is desirable that the state should construct this facility. 

Mr. Alexander stated that the cost estimate on total first 
stage construction in January, 1969 dollars, including the library, 
2000 parking spaces, transit link, College one, College two, one-hal:: 
science center, one-half central stores and shops and administration 
and site work would run to $115,000,000. Completely finished, the 
Stage One cost could run to $225,000,000 in capital costs plus about 
$35,000,000 in self-liquidating costs for a total of approximately 
$260,000,000. 

It was emphasized that, due to already accumulating delays 
it will be extremely difficult to hit the 1972 deadline for opening 
the campus . 

Chancellor Broderick pointed out that, in all dealing to 
date, we have always stated that 1972 was a possible date achievable 
only under the most stringent terms. Chiefly, we would need to be 
relieved of the usual state procedures. The Governor has urged his 
people to move as fast as possible with the project, but state pro- 
cedural structures were not removed. It was further emphasized that 
one goal is to start the site work by the spring of 1970 (obviously 
we will need the land by then); also, it will be impossible to build 
the first stage for $50,000,000. 

President Lederle and Trustee Rowland stressed the impor- 
tance of having the main parking area constructed close to Morrissey 
Boulevard. 



3364 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. O'Brien pointed out that there was no early anticipa- 
tion that the Boston College High School property would become avail- 
able. However, there should be some planning now to utilize that 
land in the event that it does become available in the future. 

Trustee Troy raised a question whether the campus would be 
constructed by one group of architects in an overall design, or 
whether there would be several architects. Mr. Belluschi responded 
that this was a very important question. He is painfully aware of 
the smallness of the site. Clean, new thinking will be required. 
Some attention will have to be given to erection of a megastructure 
and how this can be expanded in the future. An absolutely functioraL 
design will be needed with-, no architecture "to glorify the individual 
architect." He hoped to have flexibility, with interchange provided 
from classrooms to laboratories to offices. He hoped for a struc- 
ture with "wells" through which all services may become available. 
He favored a modular design which could change and be flexible and 
yet make sense in terms of immediate requirements. 

After much further discussion, it was the sense of the 
meeting that overall coordinating architects would be desirable, but 
that individual architects might be required for the core area, and 
for the subsequent groups of colleges constructed. Treasurer 
Johnson noted that the final decision on architects must be made by 
the Designer Selection Board. He stated that Board action is needed 
now to facilitate appointment of appriasers and surveyors, and to 
determine who, through the Designer Selection Board, will be the 
architects . 

Mr. Sasaki said that, because of the "overlap" requirement, 
it is now necessary to start: 

a. the integrated coordinated design 

b. the integrated coordinated schedule 

Messrs. Belluschi and Sasaki indicated their willingness 
to undertake this task and then move back later to more of a coordi- 
nating role. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton stated that he would like: 

1. to employ a single firm as coordinating architects 
to prepare schematics 

2. to select an architect in addition for working 
drawings for the central spine 

3. to select separate architect also for each of 
the first two colleges 

The "spine" architect, Mr. Hamilton said, would set the pace against 
which other architects would be forced to compete. 

Trustee Pumphret queried what similarity would prevail be- 
tween colleges one and two. Mr. Hamilton responded that he hoped 
they would not be similar in design, but in schematics. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

A list was distributed of all architects who have ever 
worked on a University project. Further discussion ensued concern- 
ing the number of architects who should be involved in the project. 
Treasurer Johnson outlined the procedures of the Designer Selection 
Board. 

1. DSB presently advertise for applicants for 
the project (in the past the Treasurer has 
specifically invited any architects to apply 
in whom the Trustees expressed interest. The 
University has only one vote on the Designer 
Selection Board, but they will normally query 
how we wish to have the project handled) . 

2. The Designer Selection Board will next in- 
vite and interview and then recommend three 
architects to the Commissioner of Administra- 
tion who will make the final selection of a 
single architect. 

The Treasurer stressed the current need for the Trustees 
to review the list of architects in whom we are interested so that 
a recommendtion can be made at an early date to the Designer Selec- 
tion Board. 

In response to query from Trustee Rowland, Chairman Haigis 
advised that Messrs. Belluschi and Sasaki might well serve as the 
coordinating architects over the entire project. After brief 
further discussion in which it was once again stressed that surveyors 
and appraisers should be brought immediately to the site, and upon 
distribution of a memorandum by Vice Chancellor Hamilton, it was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
upon the recommendation of Chancellor 
Broderick, Vice Chancellor William R. 
Hamilton, Jr., University of Massachusetts, 
Boston, be and hereby is authorized to enter 
into an agreement, or agreements, on behalf 
of this Board for the purpose of obtaining 
fair and accurate appraisals of the value of 
lands and appurtenances within the boundaries 
of the Columbia Point site as established by 
law. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Vice Chancellor William R. Hamilton, Jr. , 
be and hereby is authorized to enter an 
agreement or agreements on behalf of the 
Board for the purpose of obtaining accurate 
surveys of the boundaries of all parcelts of 
land within the boundaries of the Columbia 
Point site as established by law. 



3365 



3366 



COMMITTEE 



World 
Fair 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Hamilton stated that he has three firms of appraisers 
in mind: 

Grush of R. M. Bradley & Co., Inc. 

Singer of Singer Associates 

Cary of Leggat, McCall & Werner, Inc. 

He also recommended as the surveying firm, New England 
Surveys, a firm acceptable to the Land Court. 

After further discussion, it was also moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
three appraisals be made of each land 
parcel at the Columbia Point site of the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
we proceed with the acquisition of approxi- 
mately 20 acres of land in the north quadrant 
of Columbia Point with the understanding that 
the University Board of Trustees is sympathetic 
to the need for development of future housing 
in the area, and that, under warranted cir- 
cumstances, the land may be reconveyed at some 
time in the future to the City of Boston for 
this purpose. 

Chancellor Broderick reported to the committee that, on 
the 24th of September, he will join with Boston's Expo-76 team in a 
visit to Washington, D.C. for the purpose of advancing the City's 
interest in obtaining the World Fair for Boston in 1976. He stated 
that he will reflect the University position: that we could co- 
operate if Boston is awarded the exposition, but that we are not 
actively seeking the fair for this site. 

Agreement was reached that a meeting of the Buildings and 
Grounds Committee of the Board of Trustees would be held in Boston 
on Thursday, September 18, to consider recommendation of architects 
for the UM/ Bos ton campus together with other business. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:40 a.m. 



f 




RotSe^tf 'J. McCartr 
Secretary/ Board of Trustees 



! 



336? 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
September 18, 1969, 11:00 a.m., Sheraton-Plaza Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Haigis; Trustees Pumphret, 
Crowley, Knowles , Troy; Secretary 
McCartney, Treasurer Johnson. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Dean Soutter, Chancellor Broderick, 

Vice-chancellor Hamilton, Mr. O'Brien, 

Mr. Prince, Mrs. Hull. 

At the invitation of Chairman Haigis, Chancellor 
Broderick reported on progress to date on plans for development of 
the Columbia Point campus. The procedures involving surveyors and 
appraisals have moved rapidly, with final approvals and contracts 
being processed today. 

On the matter of architect selection, the plan calls for 
(1) one architect for the Library and the Natural Sciences Build- 
ing, (2) two separate "star" architects for each of the colleges, 
(3) one architect each for (a) Administration Building and (b) 
Central Stores; and (4) a coordinating firm of consulting archi- 
tects . 

The following list suggests possible architects: (List 
attached) . 

Chairman Haigis asked for clarification of the role of 
the University's present design consultants - Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay Associates and Pietro Belluschi. Mr. Pumphret also raised 
questions on this matter. Mr. O'Brien explained that the problem 
of adhering tightly to an on-going schedule is of greatest signifi- 
cance, and that this would be the principle job of the coordinating 
architects. This is not presently the function of the Sasaki firm, 
as their concern is with overall site planning and design. No con- 
flict is foreseen, with the expectation being that Sasaki, Dawson 
would continue in general advisement as consultants. Also, the 
architects selected by the Designer Selection Board should be of 
the highest caliber. The design function is of great importance. 

Treasurer Johnson stressed that the concept of coordi- 
nating architects is one of keeping the individual building archi- 
tects on schedule, rather than controlling their design ideas. 

In response to Mr. Pumphret 's request for information on 
the proposed timetable for construction, Vice-chancellor Hamilton 
stated that UM at Boston expects to proceed with the taking of two 
parcels of land, the so-called "dump site" and the land opposite th^ 
Boston College High School by October 1. 



UM/Bpston 
Columbia 
Point - 
Progress 



Timetable 



3368 



COMMITTEE 



Appropriation 
Budget 

Utilities 



Designer 

Selection 

Board 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. O'Brien gave a breakdown °f figures for the 
$50,000,000 appropriation: 

Expenditures for acquisition of land $8-10 million 

Design and engineering expenses $20 million 

Excavation and site preparation, and foundations $20-22 million 
(Utilities are included in these figures) 

Mr. Pumphret expressed concern that future utilities re- 
quirements and a sequence for their installation be considered in 
the early stages of planning; also, that if electricity proved to 
be the most desirable energy source, that cost not be the deciding 
factor. Chairman Haigis asked for more information on plans for 
utilities. Mr. Johnson replied that the overall campus plan inte- 
grates utilities so that they are almost totally contained within 
each building. Quite possibly the pj.^ject will be totally electric 
electricity would be a great time-saver. 

Trustee Knowles suggested that, as they are taxpayers, 
Massachusetts architectural firms be used whenever possible. It was 
generally agreed that a Massachusetts firm would be defined as one 
maintaining offices within the state. 

Treasurer Johnson explained the procedures of the Designer 
Selection Board. This Board is required by law to advertise project 
The Board of Trustees must (1) specifically define projects by indi- 
vidual buildings, and (2) specifically ask for distinguished archi- 
tects. Individual firms submit to the Designer Selection Board 
their qualifications and the board then reviews their credentials, 
and, by taking into consideration the size and experience of the 
firms, by process of elimination gets down to a workable group. By 
a series of ballots, the Designer Selection Board reduces the list 
to three and a recommendation is then made to the Commissioner of 
Administration who makes the final selection. He may select from 
the list submitted or choose any other firm of architects. Mr. 
Johnson made the additional comment that the Designer Selection 
Board is a highly professional group and is sympathetic to the de- 
sire of the University to have top quality design in its buildings. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that he has been the voting 
representative of the Trustees on the Designer Selection Board. He 
suggested that the Board might wish to designate the Chancellor or 
Vice-chancellor to represent them on UM/Boston projects. 

Chancellor Broderick proposed that Vice-chancellor 
Hamilton represent UM/Boston to the Designer Selection Board in 
projects relevant to the Boston campus, and it was moved, seconded 
and 



3369 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Vice-chancellor William R. Hamilton, Jr. be 
designated as voting representative to the 
Designer Selection Board on matters relating 
to UM/Boston, with Treasurer Kenneth W. 
Johnson to be available as a resource person. 

Mr. Hamilton discussed the power plant and some of the 
disadvantages of various sources of power, in particular air pollu- 
tion and the extreme shortage of trained and licensed steam opera- 
tors. A Boston Edison study shows, on comparative costs of con- 
ventional vs. electric power, that electricity is the most economi- 
cal. To confirm this an independent study would have to be made. 
Mr. Pumphret stated that he was under the impression that Amherst 
studies had shown electric power to be more expensive. In explana- 
tion Mr. Johnson said that the rates for Amherst and Worcester 
could not be brought down to economical levels, and that one unique 
problem for a medical school is the need for large quantities of 
hot water. The initial cost of electricity for UM/Boston con- 
struction would be less, however, as extra insulation is required 
anyway at Columbia Point because of the environmental noise factor 
Chairman Haigis reiterated the need for a report on electric power 
other than that provided by Boston Edison. 

In answer to a question, Mr. Hamilton confirmed the fact 
that site difficulties at Columbia Point are expected, and will, in 
fact, be a major problem, "as all Boston sites are difficult." 

Mr. Hamilton also stated that the UM/Boston proposal to 
the Board of Trustees will call for taking of the Columbia Point 
properties - no negotiations. 



VOTED : 



It was then moved, seconded and 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
architectural services for the UM at Boston 
Columbia Point campus be comprised of the 
following: 

1. overall coordinating architects 

2. separate architects for each of 
five different projects 

3. a single architect for the Library 
and Natural Science buildings 



Chancellor Broderick submitted names of the following 
architects that he would recommend be considered by the State De- 
signer Selection Board for UM/Boston. 

Possible Architects for Colleges I and II 
Edward Catalano Sert, Jackson and Associates 

Architects Collaborative Hugh Stubbins 
Vincent J. Kling John Carl Warnecke 

I. M. Pei Harry Weese 



Power 
Plant 
UM/Boston 



Site 
Difficulties 



3370 



COMMITTEE 



Medical 
School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Possible Architects for Library and Science Buildings 
Vincent J. Kling 
Ernest J. Kump 
I. M. Pei 

Kevin Roche-John Dinkeloo Associates 
Skidmore, Owings, Merrill 

Possible Architects for Administration Building 
Anderson, Beckwith and Haible 
Edward Larabee Barnes 
Deeter, Ritchey & Sippel 
Ulrich Franzen 
Outcalt Guenther Partners 
Kallmann & McKinnell 
Ernest J. Kump 

Possible Architects for Central Supply Building 
J. Timothy Anderson 
Colletti Brothers 
Geometries Inc. 
Goody &. Clancy 
Drummy, Rosanne, Anderson 
Perkins & Will 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
those architects suggested by Chancellor 
Broderick be encouraged to apply to the 
State Designer Selection Board for design 
of certain projects at the Columbia Point 
campus . 

Dean Soutter reported on the Medical School. Fourteen 
firms have applied for the site work contract and the bids will be 
opened today at 2:00 p.m. The project has been delayed 52 days to 
date, resulting in impossibility of completion of site work by 
January 1. The power plant will not get underway until April 1, 
1970 and a start on the hospital is now delayed until October, 1970. 
This schedule is too tight to guarantee completion on the projected 
schedule by 197(2 or 3). The BBC is now proposing to hand carry 
contract through in order to make the award by this Monday, 
September 22. This agency is also considering "penalty" arrange- 
ments, but Dean Soutter is concerned that this would only add to 
overall costs. 

Some of the slow-downs encountered on the teaching hospita 
have involved: delays with the architectural firm including work on 
plans being stopped while key personnel went on vacation in August; 
errors in design such as floors that don't fit with the Medical 
Science Building, and awkward design such as placing ducts up in 
front of patient's windows; also, faulty placement of partitions, 
and "architecture that doesn't jive with other buildings." 



I 



I 



3371 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Soutter requested action on these problems. He agreed to re- 
circulate Medical School schedules to the Trustees for their re- 
view. It was the recommendation of the committee that the 
Secretary write a letter to Mr. Poitras, Acting Director of Build- 
ing Construction, requesting corrections and showing of drawings 
at an early date. Mr. Johnson stated that he had consultation with 
the BBC yesterday on these issues and the architects have been in- 
structed to set a meeting date in the near future to discuss the 
situation with the Buildings and Grounds Committee and representatives 
of the BBC. Dean Soutter stressed the fact that occupancy by 1973 
is of the utmost importance and that if buildings are not ready, 
serious difficulties will result. 

Another problem is that, to expedite site progress, rapid 
clearance of a license must be obtained from the Department of 
Public Works to Mr. John T. Hammon, deputy commissioner, to permit 
drainage of water into Lake Quinsigamond. Normally, this process 
takes three months. It was suggested that an attempt be made to 
enlist the help of the Commissioner of Administration. 

Mr. Johnson reported on the housing situation in Amherst 
Construction of the 1970 dormitories is ahead of schedule. These 
are the last dormitories planned for the Amherst campus. Some of 
the questions now to be decided are: will 1500 additional students 
a year be admitted? If so, what ype housing? Studies were made 
this past summer by Planning Officer Littlef ield, the Master 
Planning Committee, and student groups. There is currently much 
activity on the Amherst campus in regard to housing, such as the 
"Martin Luther King Rent Strike" which has been reported in the 
press. This summer there was a confrontation with the town manager 
concerned with low-rent housing, and there is a continuing demand 
for student apartments. In the area of housing for married stu- 
dents, the University has a "gentleman"s agreement" with the town 
not to move into the area if private interests build apartments. 
But, rents are exorbitant. The prefabricated Puff ton Village 
apartments are the least expensive but not really low-cost. In 
addition, there is the demand for low-cost housing for support 
staff for the University. Other groups are organizing for action. 

There are some possibilities for University action: 
(1) The University Apartments and Lincoln Apartments could be 
designated as low-income housing, (2) the Graduate Student Committed, 
with Dean Gentile as Chairman, proposes lowest cost, interim, 
trailer- type housing consisting of 250 units, to be self-liquidated 
over a certain length of time. Mr. Johnson has also been meeting 
with town officials who now want the University to build housing, 
feeling that it is the responsibility of the University to provide 
housing for married students. Additionally, the SCOPE Corporation 
has been investigated. This firm builds housing adjacent to 
campuses at competitive prices and has been very successful. These 
are not, however, low-rent but rather actually luxury-type housing. 
(Swimming pools in every unit, for instance.) This corporation has 



Housing 
Amherst 



W( 



337 



3 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

built $150 million worth of housing in the west including Texas and 
California. They use no federal subsidies, and buy their own prime 
land. Also, the Warnecke firm has been asked to give cost estimate 
on the same type dormitory they are now building on Eastman Lane 
but with kitchenette facilities in lieu of one bedroom. Recommenda- 
tions will be made to the next meeting of the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee, but a trustee policy will be needed first on whether the 
University at Amherst will admit an additional 1500 students 
annually. 

The present overcrowded campus situation may be due in 
part to poor assignments by the Housing Office (which is staffed by 
new personnel) and in part by some housing of fraternity people in 
dormitories due to some of the new fraternity housing not being 
completed, the Treasurer said. Activist students are exploiting the 
situation, however, and the possibility exists of it becoming ex- 
plosive. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:40 p.m. 





Secretary, Btfa/'d of Trustees 
Robert J. McCartney 




I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
October 6, 1969, 11:00 a.m., Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 

Trustees Boyden, Haigis, Lyons, Troy; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Assistant Dean Gugin, 
Associate Dean Marcus, UM/ Amherst; 
Chancellor Broderick, Vice-chancellor 
Hamilton, UM/Boston, and Mrs. Hull. 



Chairman Healey convened the session at 11:10 a.m. for 
the purpose of discussing the Reorganization Study submitted by 
Dean Joseph S. Marcus. As Staff Assistant to the Board Executive 
Committee on this matter, Dean Marcus has worked for several 
months on this report and it has involved extensive travel to other 
major university systems for interviews and research. The report 
was originally presented to this committee at its joint meeting of 
September 18 with the members of the Ad Hoc Advisory Committees on 
University-wide Reorganization (see list attached) . Its present 
form represents a consensus of views from that meeting. 

Trustee Troy expressed the hope that in staffing any 
system office proposed in the reorganization study that administra- 
tive aspects would not be emphasized at the expense of academic 
aspects. 

The intent of the study, Dean Marcus said, is not to pro- 
duce at this time a definitive document but rather to outline, in 
general terms, the basic structure of the proposed reorganization 
plan. A new system President, it was felt, should have the powers 
and duties of the office defined, but should have as much freedom 
of operation as possible. 

Full and general discussion followed and agreement was 
reached on minor changes to be made in the basic document as 
follows : 

1. Deletion in line 2 of Section IIA of Addendum 
of October 1, 1969 the word ."ef ficient. " 

2. Reword Section IIA of Addendum to recognize 
authority of the Board of Trustees. 

3. Insertion in Section IIIC (p. 2) :.... "opera- 
tional (academic) programs..." 

4. Deletion Section IVC (p. 3) of all but first 
line. 



3373 



Reorganization 

Study 

Report 



3374 



COMMITTEE 



System 
Staff 



Development 
of State-wide 
Educational 
System 



Alternative 
Approaches 



Duplication 
of Facilities 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Broderick queried whether the system staff as 
presently conceived was not top heavy. It was affirmed that three 
or four Vice-Presidents would be an absolute minimum for the system, 
and that these should be first-rate administrators, having a staff 
relationship to the President. The Chancellors of the individual 
campuses, operating with as much autonomy as possible, would have a 
direct line relationship to the President. It was emphasized here 
that the VP's would not "come between" the Chancellors and the Presi 
dent as there would be a basic difference in their functions. The 
Vice-Presidents for example, would report directly to the President 
on a staff relationship basis and would have no authority over the 
Chancellors. Chairman Healey stressed the need for men of stature 
on the President's supporting staff as the University system will 
be the top focal point for education in the state, as well as one 
of the largest state operations. He added that the estimated cost 
of establishing a system office would be a very small percentage of 
the total University budget. 

Dean Marcus observed that the University system should be 
at the forefront of all higher education in the state. One function 
of the Vice-President for Academic Affairs, for example, would be 
to establish and maintain liaison with the leadership of other seg- 
ments in the state-wide higher educational system, such as the state 
and community college systems. 

Trustee Haigis asked if other alternative approaches to a 
University system had been considered; for instance, concentrating 
on the unique aspects of such already existing institutions as 
Southeastern Massachusetts University and having the present Univer- 
sity centers function independently with their own board of trustees 
Dean Marcus replied that this question is answered in the negative 
in the Loomis Report. 

Trustee Troy suggested that the University should evolve 
a system from a modest beginning. Dean Marcus pointed out, however, 
that "evolving" systems have experienced difficulties; also, that it 
is far preferable to start with as complete an organization as is 
practicable. 

Secretary McCartney observed that the University system 
concept is extremely sound. However, thought should be given to re- 
vising Section VII (p. 8) of the System Recommendation Proposal - 
particularly paragraphs two and three - if this section is intended 
as the hinge point on "justification for creation of a system." 
The rationale appears to require strengthening and amplification by 
adding detail and enumeration of examples of improved management 
operations and efficiency which will result from the reorganization 
so as to provide a package with maximum attractiveness to leadership 
at the state level. 

The discussion turned to avoiding duplication of expensive 
facilities and projects among the several campuses. The present 
capacity and service levels of the computer facilities on the Amhers : 



3375 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

campus were described. Although there are some difficulties in- 
volved with having the University system rely totally on the 
Amherst facility, it was felt that there are many alternative 
approaches available. Programming, for instance, could be directed 
by the central administration with equal access to the facility 
provided for all campuses. Chairman Healey also noted that com- 
puter technology is advancing so rapidly that many new possibili- 
ties would open up; for instance, a GE shared-time hook-up, or use 
of the IBM facility on Route 128. 

Treasurer Johnson expressed concern over some aspects of 
the reorganization plan in relation to budgetary control. He noted 
that budget control factor was removed from the job description of 
the VP for Finance and Management. He also noted that strong 
campus autonomy would, in effect, decentralize control of the 
budgetary system. It was affirmed that the control policy was de- 
fined on page three of the Study under " Presidential Duties and 
Powers " where the control function is assigned to the President. 

Chairman Healey emphasized that budgetary control is 
implicit in the functions of the President's office, and that a re- 
porting system would be inherent in the plan, with individual 
campuses sending regular reports to the VP for Financial Affairs 
for analysis. Mr. Johnson also foresaw unavoidable duplication of 
business procedures such as accounting, purchasing and payroll 
operations among the several campuses. 

President Lederle concurred with Mr. Johnson that there 
would be a necessity for detailed procedures to meet auditor's 
specifications. He added that autonomy gives the Board of Trustees 
real power and responsibilities, and that the reorganization plan 
must provide a central administration with the authority necessary 
to assure firm financial control. 

Secretary McCartney commented that the outline of duties 
for the Vice-President for Administration seemed heavily all en- 
compassing and therefore burdensome -- particularly in view of the 
great commitment of time required seasonally to do an effective 
coordinating job, for example, in the legislative relations area 
alone. A similar problem arises with the heavy time commitment re- 
quired to coordinate effective fund raising. The Secretary called 
for setting up strong communications (PR) units on each of the 
campuses. Chairman Healey indicated that the duties spelled out 
under the various Vice Presidencies are "as if," that is to say, 
tentative; also that staff support is called for in each vice- 
presidential area, and that latitude must be given for the new 
President to spell out in specific detail what operational areas 
will be covered by his Vice-Presidents. 

Chairman Healey stressed again the importance of accept- 
ing at this time the basic philosophy of the reorganization pro- 
posal and a plan for presenting it to the full Board on October 18. 



Budgetary 
Control 



Duties for 
Vice-President 
for Administr; 
tion 



3376 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Presentation to the Legislature will follow. It was agreed that, 
after one further review to incorporate any changes deemed desirable 
the present document will be presented to the Board. 

Dean Gugin referred to the need for a decision on whether 
or not 1,500 additional students will be admitted next year. A 
policy recommendation should be presented at the October 18 meeting 
of the Board. 

Following lunch the confidential list of honorary degree 
candidates for 1970 was discussed. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:55 p.m. 




f 



RoJ 

Secretai 




J. Fltcartcfey 
oard of Trustees 



f 



f 



I 



COMMITTEE 



J 



J 



Qi^% 



67 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Ad Hoc Advisory Committees on University-wide Organization 



Amherst Campus : 



Boston Campus : 



Dean Kenneth Picha 
Professor Ronald Reid 
Professor Glen Gordon 
Professor Bruce Morris 
Miss Cynthia Olken, Vice President, 
Student Senate 



Dean Paul Gagnon 

Professor James Ryan, faculty representa- 
tive to the Board of Trustees 

Professor George Goodwin 

Professor Fuad Safwat 

Mr. Andrew Warren, Vice-chairman of the 
Student Council 



Worcester Campus :Dr. R. W. Butcher 
Mr. John Stockwell 



Professor Joseph Marcus 



3378 



COMMITTEE 



Report on 

Black 

Studies 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
October 7, 1969, 11:00 a.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst 

PRESENT : Chairman Troy, President Lederle; 
Trustees Boyden, Haigis, Lambson, 
Plimpton; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Provost Tippo, Dean Shapiro, Pro- 
fessors: Gordon, Morris, Silver, 
Ulin of the Faculty Senate, UM/ 
Amherst; Mrs. Hull. 



Chairman Troy called the meeting to order at 11:10 a.m. 

The first agenda item considered was the Report on Program 
for Black Studies - UM/Amherst . Dean Shapiro commented on progress 
in this area since last year's student demands for a black studies 
program. Faculty Senate debate had produced a recommendation for 
teaching of some core studies such as black history and the sociology 
of ghetto areas. A committee has been formed which expects to com- 
plete a report by the end of October. The precise form of the pro- 
gram is still being debated, but there is agreement that it will be 
based in Arts and Sciences. 



Three faculty members have been recruited and appointed as 
visiting lecturers this semester. All have unorthodox backgrounds, 
but it is felt that they do have a scholarly approach, and the 
response from the students has been very good. One of these men is 
Algerian with a United Nations background. The other two have been 
connected with the Institute for Political Studies. In response to 
the Chairman's question as to the particular courses taught by these 
people, Dean Shapiro named black history, contemporary politics, and 
courses within the English department. Also, black and African art 
courses are being taught by a person with a museum background, and 
courses in black literature and black drama are contemplated. 

President Lederle expressed concern that black professors 
not be recruited from black land grant institutions. Dean Shapiro 
concurred, and mentioned one instance in which a black professor in- 
terested in teaching at the University had been planning to leave 
his institution anyway. 

Provost Tippo expressed hope that Five-College courses 
could be utilized in the area of black studies. President Plimpton 
commented that the experience at Amherst College had been that 
black students wanted their own professors, not an exchange pro- 
fessor. 



3379 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Troy asked about the effect of activist associa- 
tions of some of the new faculty members connected with this pro- 
gram. Dean Shapiro thought that where this existed, objectivity 
was increasing. 

In response to the Chairman's question as to whether the 
faculty for this program need be completely black, Professor Ulin 
responded that he was impressed with the objectivity of the people 
involved; they seemed to feel no necessity for a color line. 

The committee next considered the Proposal to Establish 
a Named Chair - UM/ Amherst, recommended by Acting Dean Shapiro of 
the College of Arts and Sciences. This professorship is to be 
established to honor the memory of Ray Ethan Torrey, one of this 
country's most distinguished teachers of Botany. Professor Torrey 
was born in North Leverett in 1887, awarded a B.S. from Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College in 1912, and received his M.A. and Ph.D 
from Harvard University. Most of his teaching career was spent at 
his alma mater, where thousands of Massachusetts students found 
his teaching an uplifting and unforgettable experience. Professor 
Torrey died in Amherst, January 16, 1956. 

Dean Shapiro commented on the unique qualifications of 
Professor Albert C. Smith to hold this Professorship. Provost 
Tippo further commented that Professor Smith is the only living 
botanist to have discovered a new family of plants. Professor 
Smith now holds the Wilder Professorship at the University of 
Hawaii, and is among the most distinguished persons in his field 
in the United States. 

After brief discussion, and upon motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
a Professorship in the Department of Botany 
at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst 
be established and named for former Pro- 
fessor Ray Ethan Torrey with Professor 
Albert C. Smith to be named to the chair. 

Discussion moved to the third item on the agenda: furthe 
discussion of UM/A Faculty Senate Proposal for Changes in Faculty 
Participation in University Governance . Professor Glen Gordon, 
Secretary of the Faculty Senate, briefly reviewed the fact that 
this proposal had resulted from the charge to the UM/A Faculty 
Senate Ad Hoc Long Range Planning Committee. Professor Gordon then 
turned discussion of the rationale for the proposal over to Pro- 
fessor Bruce Morris, Moderator of the Faculty Senate. Professor 
Morris noted that this matter had been under debate in the Faculty 
Senate for several months before agreement was reached that this 
proposal was the only acceptable plan (the other major proposal 
offered had been a form of collective bargaining.) The document 
being presented contains 14 motions; however, only six of these re- 
quire Board action. 



Ray Ethan 
Torrey 

Professorship 
of Botany 



Faculty 
Senate UM/A 
Proposal for 
Changes in 
University 
Governance 



3380 



COMMITTEE 



Attendance- 
Executive 
Session 



Attendance- 

"Informal" 

Sessions 



Student 
Participation 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor Morris then reviewed the four basic principles 
of the proposal: 

1. The Board of Trustees should base de- 
cisions on the fullest possible information from 
administration, faculty and students, with con- 
sideration being given to the competency of the 
group involved in any particular decision. The 
faculty feels it is the group most competent in 
the area of personnel and academic matters. 

2. The most effective operation of the 
University is through shared and responsible 
cooperation. The justification of faculty 
participation is more a question of efficiency 
than it is a right. 

3. There should be faculty participation 
at every level. 

4. The faculty must accept its responsi- 
bility and be willing to "work at it," if the 
proposal is to be effective. 

Chairman Troy questioned item 4(a) of the proposal, con- 
cerning attendance of the Faculty Senate representative at all 
sessions of the Board of Trustees, "including executive sessions." 
President Plimpton felt that it was sometimes necessary to discuss 
sensitive matters, when even top personnel might be excluded from 
an executive session; also, that the terminology used was in effect 
a "blanket phrase" which could preclude the Board's privacy in some 
discussions. President Lederle concurred in the opinion that the 
right of the official members of the Board to go into executive 
session when necessary must be preserved. 

Further discussion clarified the fact that there was some 
misconception over the nature of "informal" sessions of the Board 
where the intent is to have working sessions with press coverage ex- 
cluded. No votes are taken; there is only a frank exchange of 
views. By invitation of Chairman Healey, the representative of the 
Faculty Senate is welcome at the "informal" sessions. 

The forthcoming addition of a student member to the Board 
was discussed. It was pointed out that the student would be an 
official, sworn member of the Board, bound by the same ethics as 
any other member. 

Discussion followed on other points of the Faculty Senate 
Proposal. Query was made on when action by the committee might be 
expected. The Chairman pointed out that there was a Faculty-Student 
Senate Proposal from UM/Boston coming up for consideration and that 
limitations on time available for committee meetings must be 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



recognized. Also, it will be necessary to arrange a joint meeting 
with the Executive Committee on this matter before action can be 
taken. 

Professor Isidore Silver next reviewed agenda item (4): 
The Revised Proposal for Ombudsman - UM/A. He noted that this 
document (T70-025) differs slightly from the original document 
(T69-060) in several respects in that the scope of privileges and 
responsibilities has been somewhat narrowed. The Ombudsman must 
be a faculty member; also, provision is made for a co-ombudsman who 
may be a student. The post is envisioned as a part-time assignment 
in terms of work load, with no staff except possibly a secretary. 
The Ombudsman would do his own investigating. In reply to a 
question as to what type of files would be open to the Ombudsman, 
Professor Silver replied that such files as are now available to 
the Tenure and Grievance Committees, for instance, would be open. 
Medical and otherwise legally privileged files of course would not 
be. Professor Silver noted that on campuses now having Ombudsmen 
there is no apparent problem with files. He stressed the fact that 
the Ombudsman would have the power of recommendation only. 



3381 



Revised 
Proposal for 
Ombudsman 
UM/ Amherst 



two. 



Provost Tippo urged trial of the proposal for a year or 

After motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the revised proposal for establishment of the 
post of Ombudsman as detailed in Document 
T70-025 be approved. 



it was 

VOTED : 



The Board then went into Executive Session at which time 
To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 



accept the appointment of Robert L. 
Gluckstern as Associate Provost. 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:45 p.m. 




Robert^ J/. McCartney 
Secretary, M?oard of Trust* 



3382 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



BLANK PAGE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
October 17, 1969, 2:00 p.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst, Mass, 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



33! 



>«1 



Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Gordon, Troy; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Deans Field, Gentile, 
Lindsey, Professors Dittfach and Zube, 
Messrs. Littlefield, Norton and West, UM/A; 
Chancellor Broderick, Vice-Chancellor 
Hamilton, Mr. Prince, UM/B; Dean Soutter, 
UM/W. From the Graduate Student Senate, 
Messrs. Texeira and Yelton and Mrs. Hull. 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 2:05 p.m. In the 
absence of a quorum there was general discussion on several topics, 
and reports on progress of the Medical School as well as the Tobin 
Hall and all-weather track projects. Mr. Johnson reported on his 
negotiations with Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates for better rates 
in the contract now up for renewal. The hourly rate for principals, 
for instance, is up $10, but is as low as the firm can go. Mr. 
Johnson recommends acceptance. 

At 2:30 p.m., with a quorum present, Chairman Haigis re- 
turned the meeting to the regular order of business with the first 
agenda item - Student Housing-Amherst . Mr. Johnson presented an ex- 
tensive report on the Married Student Housing situation. University 
policy, worked out in cooperation with town officials over the past 
several years, has been not to build apartment units as long as the 
private sector was doing so. Now, however, at the present admission 
rate of 1500 additional students per year, about 200 units are 
needed yearly for married students in addition to faculty and staff 
demands. The slow-down in the housing caused by tight money and 
high interest rates has affected private building and pushed rents 
up, resulting in an acute shortage of low-rental units. 



Many campus groups have 
a Faculty Senate Committee headed 
partment of Landscape Architecture 
and a Graduate Senate Committee wi 
man. The latter group has worked 
University Planning Officer, who h 
of the problem. Agreement has bee 
It is felt that while private inte 
tinue to building apartments, rent 
meet the student-set criteria of $ 



been concerned with the problem: 
by Professor Ervin Zube of the De 
, the Master Planning Committee, 
th Associate Dean Gentile as Chair 
extensively with Mr. Littlefield, 
as also made an exhaustive study 
n reached on possible solutions, 
rests will be encouraged to con- 
s on these will remain too high to 
140 maximum monthly rental. 



There was brief discussion of a study made by Mr. Little- 
field of pre-fabricated single family mobile units; also of a request 
to the Warnecke Architectural firm to cost out a duplication of the 
1970 dormitories on Eastman Lane, with one room converted to a 



Married 
Student 
Housing 
Amherst 



3384 



COMMITTEE 

Proposal - 
Modular Type 
Pre- 
fabricated 
Housing Units 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

kitchen. A report on the latter is due, but not yet received. In 
any case, such apartments could not be ready for September, 1970. 

Another proposal is to construct through the University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority pre-fabricated modular units on a 
University-owned tract of 30 acres adjacent to the campus on North 
Pleasant Street. Although this site is not an ideal one (there is 
a drainage problem as well as access and landscape problems) esti- 
mates show that single units could be built to rent for $140-150 a 
month. Over all cost estimates would run: $900,000 for site de- 
velopment; $4,500 for individual units; and $2,300 for individual 
unit site development. In order to provide housing for September, 
1970, on an already tight timetable, prompt action by the Board will 
be necessary. 

,After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees: 

1. That housing be made available for married 
students as their numbers increase at the 
Amherst Campus. 

2. That the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority be requested to provide not fewer 
than 200 low rental housing units for married 
students who are attending the University of 
Massachusetts-Amherst for occupancy by 
September 1, 1970, and that this housing be 
provided in one of the following ways: 

First , by leasing through competitive bids 
solicited from private enterprise 
sources not fewer than 200 new low 
rental units for a period of five 
years suitable for married students 
in reasonable proximity to the Uni- 
versity's Amherst Campus, said units 
to be provided by others on privately 
owned land. 

Second , in the event that suitable married 

student housing cannot be built under 
First above, to request the University 
of Massachusetts Building Authority to 
construct on University-owned land 
approximately 200 units either of a 
pre-fabricated single family unit or a 
pre-fabricated modular apartment type 
of unit as may be determined most 
feasible on a cost and completion date 
basis . 

Mr. Texeira of the Graduate Student Senate expressed the 
appreciation of the Graduate Student Senate for University action on 
this matter. 



r 



3385 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Associate Dean Arthur Gentile of the Graduate School re- 
viewed the second agenda item - Hodgkins Cove Property . Acquisitior. 
of this privately-owned seven acre tract in Gloucester has been 
under discussion for some time. It is a highly desirable location 
having an unusual advantage of being a "clean water" site; it is 
readily accessible to all University campuses. A facility of this 
type is a necessity for further development of such important Uni- 
versity programs as Marine Science and the Ph.D. in Ocean Engineer 
ing. There is also the possibility of joint use with the University 
of Rhode Island of its research vessel at this site. 

It was pointed out that the family interests controlling 
this property, as well as city officials in Gloucester are enthusi- 
astic about its acquisition by the University, but the property can- 
not be held off the open market indefinitely. This is probably the 
last year it will be available. The University of Massachusetts 
Foundation is to be approached on this matter. 

It is also hoped to acquire the Dolliver's Neck property 
when the Coast Guard phases out there in a year or so. The two 
properties could be used in conjunction with each other. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

instruct the University administration to 
move ahead vigorously on acquisition of the 
Hodgkins Cove property. 

Treasurer Johnson next asked for Board approval of a new 
schematic for Roads and Signs - Amherst . The detailed list of all 
campus traffic signs installed over the last two months was pre- 
sented. After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the schematic for road and 
traffic signs on the University's Amherst 
campus as detailed on maps prepared by the 
Department of Physical Plant (Document 
T70-026) . 

It was also noted that an error had been made in Document 
T70-012 regarding motor vehicle regulations which document was 
approved by the Board of Trustees at its meeting of August 11, 1969, 
After a request that correction be made, it was moved, seconded and 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
VOTED : That the first sentence of Section 1, Article V 
of the Motor Vehicle Regulations for the Amherst 
campus approved by the Board of Trustees on 
August 11, 1969 (Document T79-012) be amended by 
changing Roman nume^-il III appearing therein to 
Roman numeral IV. 



Hodgkins 

Cove 

Property 



Dolliver ' s 

Neck 



Roads and 
Signs - 
Amherst 



Motor 

Vehicle 

Regulations 



Correction of 
Error in 
Document 
T70-012 



_ 



3386 



COMMITTEE 

Plans and 
Specifications 

Amherst 

Tobin Hall 

and 
All-weather 
Track 



Columbia 
Point - 
Land 
Acquisition 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Haigis next invited Treasurer Johnson to intro- 
duce agenda item number four - Plans and Specifications - Amherst . 

The Treasurer asked Mr. George Norton, Director of the 
Physical Plant, to review the plans for Tobin Hall and the all- 
weather track at the Physical Education Field. The Tobin Hall plans 
have not yet been approved, having just been received with minor 
site changes. The track plans have just gone to the BBC. Fontaine 
was the low bidder for Tobin Hall at $5,777,000 against the 
O'Connell bid of $5,826,000. However, these bids were against an 
architect's estimate of $4,600,000. It was noted that the closeness 
of the bids is verification that they are in order. It was also 
noted that the estimate includes cost of relocation of the tennis 
courts (necessitated by construction) . The total project cost is 
$7,602,000, with an original appropriation of $5,840,000. It is 
hoped that the deficit may be covered in part with BBC contingency 
funds and in part by economies in movable equipment allocations, 
and hopefully by salvaging some of the tennis courts now marked for 
relocation, by a change in some of the contractor's (boundary) 
lines . 

Chairman Haigis made several points: He stressed the 
necessity for the closest possible watch on expenditures, noting a 
207, increase in cost estimates on the Tobin project due to escala- 
tion during the time elapsed since the original appropriation re- 
quest. He also questioned whether there had been student partici- 
pation on the Master Planning Committee. Mr. Norton replied 
affirmatively. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
VOTED : approve final plans for Tobin Hall as 

prepared by the architectural firm of 

Coletti Brothers, with detailed documents 

on file in the office of Mr. George Norton, 

Department of Physical Plant. 

Vice-Chancellor Hamilton next reported on Land Acquisition 
at Columbia Point . Standard appraisal procedures have been complete 
and everything is in order for the taking of Parcel (E) (Mary Kelley 
lot) at the appraisal average of $935,000; and for parcels (F) and 
(h) at Boston College High School at a total award figure of 
$587,582. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

in accordance with Chapter 898, Item 7490-0102 
of the Acts of 1969, and all other acts, 
authorizing the Trustees of the University to 
acquire land, or land with buildings thereon, 
by purchase or by eminent domain under Chapter 
79 of the General Laws, for the development of 
the University of Massachusetts at Columbia Point 



I! 



COMMITTEE 



I 



J 



338? 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



in the City of Boston; independent appraisals 
having been made by qualified disinterested 
appraisers and filed with Vice-Chancellor 
William R. Hamilton, Jr.; the Trustees of the 
University purchase or take by eminent domain 
in fee, a parcel of land now or formerly the 
Robert Haufler property as shown as parcel (E) 
on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Boston, 
(Dorchester) Mass," surveyed by New England 
Survey Service Inc. October 6, 1969 and that 
the sum of $935,000 be and hereby is awarded 
as damages therefor and $5,941.56 for taxes 
apportioned for the current year, and that 
Robert J. McCartney, Secretary, Board of 
Trustees is hereby authorized to sign the 
order of taking for and in the name of the 
Board of Trustees. 

Vice-Chancellor Hamilton also noted that the Designer 
Selection Board has recommended to the Commissioner of Administra- 
tion and Finance, the names of three engineering firms for UM/B 
site development: Charles T. Main, Jackson and Moreland, and Fay, 
Spofford and Thorndyke. 

The BBC has decided also to employ the services of a con- 
struction management firm on this project rather than to manage it 
themselves. Three qualified firms have responded and these names 
will go to the Designer Selection Board next Wednesday, October 22, 
at which time the DSB will also resolve the question of whether to 
approach the architectural problems of the Columbia Point campus on 
a consortium basis or otherwise. Messrs. Belluschi and Sasaki 
approve of a coordinated (Consortium) approach. 

Also of interest: the Vice-Chancellor reported that more 
than 100~a~rehitectural firms have responded to the Designer Selec- 
tion Board advertising for this project. Board opinion, however, is 
divided as to whether the entire project should be re-advertised 
with more specific wording as to the consortium arrangement, which 
was not clear in the original advertisement. (A decision on this 
will probably also be reached on October 22, 1969) . 

Dean Soutter next reported on agenda item six - Site Work- 
Contracts Awarded-Medical School . Site work started on Saturday, 
October 4, two months behind schedule (but with the BBC maintaining 
the original completion date.) The contract, however, is $200,000 
less than the original estimate. 

There is a problem with location of a culvert under land 
belonging to the Department of Natural Resources. The Department 
disagrees with the easement and to date a solution has not been 
found with the result that the contractor's work has been delayed. 
Mr. Poitras of BBC will negotiate on this matter to see if construc- 
tion work can proceed. 



Medical 
School - 
Site Work 
Contracts 

Awarded 



3388 



Shaw 
Building 



COMMITTEE 



Room 
Refund Rate 

UM/ Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Shaw Building renovations contract is now scheduled 
for bid November 1, with construction date set for December 1, 1969. 
The BBC has been asked to set June 1, 1970 as the completion date. 
The architects schedules for the other buildings are satisfactory 
except for the Medical Science Building which now has an indetermi- 
nate end point for construction. 

Dean Soutter expressed need for a third architectural 
estimate on the hospital for capital outlay budgets for next year. 
Escalation may increase costs over a six month period, and it is 
extremely important to have the most accurate figures possible for 
presentation to the Legislature. 

The hospital architects are ready for presentation of 
plans to the Board. Also, the hospital elevation plans have not yet 
been approved, and are now in conformity with the other buildings. 
A meeting of the Buildings and Grounds Committee will be set for 
early November to review plans and consider other matters affecting 
capital outlay. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Bureau of Building Construction be re- 
quested to have an additional estimating 
firm provide new cost estimates on the Uni- 
versity's teaching hospital. 

The Chairman next called for discussion of item seven - 
Room Refund Rate - Amherst . 

Dean Field said that a policy change in the rate of refund 
when students are tripled is recommended. Students feel that the 
present 207, refund is not adequate or fair. He recommends that a 
307. refund be authorized regardless of the high cost of dormitory 
operation. In response to Trustee Troy's question as to how many 
students are now involved in "tripling," the Dean replied that the 
number now stood at 254 occupancies (or 762 students actually in- 
volved) . It was pointed out that some vacancies now exist, and that 
all tripled students have been so notified. No arbitrary action to 
relocate students is taken, however, as "un-tripling" can involve a 
change of roommate or dormitory which is not always desired. 

President Lederle also favored the refund increase to 307, 
After further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that all 
previous votes of the Trustees pertaining to 
the refund of portions of student room rent 
when there is assigned occupancy over the 
normal occupancy level of a room be resicinded 
and that in place thereof the following policy 
be established: 



3389 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



That when students are assigned at the con- 
venience of the University to a resident hall 
room in a number in excess of the normal 
occupancy level of that room for a period in 
excess of six weeks in any semester, the room 
rental rate for each such student shall be ad- 
justed to 70% of the then current rate for that 
room and if such room is equipped with a 
telephone the rate for the telephone shall also 
be adjusted to 707 o of the normal rate per stu- 
dent; provided, that in the administration of 
this policy "the convenience of the University" 
shall not be construed to in any way negate the 
pledge previously undertaken by the Trustees 
to the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority with reference to maintaining full 
occupancy in Authority owned buildings; this 
policy to be effective with the Fall semester, 
1969. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority that it adopt as part of its 
rules and regulations governing the Residence 
Halls owned by the Authority the room rate ad- 
justment policy adopted by the Trustees as of 
this date. 

Item nine - Policy on Naming of Buildings , was next 
discussed. President Lederle commented on the proposal to name the 
Main Engineering Building for George A. Marston, the first Dean of 
the School. He said that the persistance of this proposal was an 
indication of its merit and noted that there was a precedent for 
the naming of University buildings in some cases after living per- 
sons - namely, the Boyden Building, and Holdsworth and Brett Halls. 

Associate Dean E. Ernest Lindsey reviewed Dean Marston's 
University career from his arrival in 1933 to his retirement in 
1963. (He is now with Western New England College.) Mention was 
made of the high regard with which Dean Marston is held nationally 
and internationally in engineering circles. He has been head of 
the Land Grant Association's engineering section; also, vice- 
president of a national engineering association, the presidency of 
which he declined because of his imminent retirement. 

Professor John Dittfach spoke of Dean Marston's dedica- 
tion to the undergraduate school on engineering and also noted that 
three faculty members recruited by the Dean have received the Uni- 
versity's Distinguished Teaching Award. Professor Dittfash said 
that Dean Picha who was unable to be at the meeting also heartily 
endorses the proposal. 



Policy on 
Naming of 
Buildings 



Naming of 
Main Engineer- 
ing Building 
for George 
A. Marston 



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Capital 
Outlay 
Budget - 
UM/ Bos ton 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Troy said that he had the highest regard for Dean 
Marston and urged making an exception in this instance to the policy 
on naming buildings only for deceased individuals. Provost Tippo 
added that this proposal has much faculty support. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Main Engineering Building on the Uni- 
versity's Amherst campus be named in honor 
of George A. Marston, first dean of the 
Engineering School . 

Chairman Haigis invited comment from Chancellor Broderick 
and Vice-Chancellor Hamilton on the UM/Boston capital outlay budget. 
It was pointed out that the UM/Boston budget should be kept com- 
pletely separate from UM/ Amherst in all public discussion and rela- 
tions with state government. 

The Chancellor stated that we now need to go back for an 
additional $100,000,000 in capital outlay to complete Phase I of the 
Columbia Point campus for 5000 students. 

Trustee Gordon observed that, in his view, it may not be 
clear in some circles that the $50,000,000 approved by Governor 
Sargent and voted by the Legislature last summer is sufficient only 
for site work, foundations, design, utilities and some land acquisi 
tion. He called for stress and emphasis on this point in dealings 
with the Legislature, the Governor and the press. 

Treasurer Johnson queried whether the BBC has its schedule 
set yet. "Do we know that the initial $50,000,000 will be 
committed as we intended?" 



and 



After brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
a capital outlay request of $100,000,000 
for fiscal 1971 be approved for the UM/Boston 
Columbia Point campus with instruction to the 
administration that the attention of the 
Governor and the Legislature be called to 
the fact that the $50,000,000 appropriation 
of 1969 was mainly for design, site work, 
land acquisition, and foundations with the 
additional $100,000,000 now required for 
actual construction of buildings and facili- 
ties for Phase I - to accommodate 5000 stu- 
dents. Details are set forth in Documents 
T70-028 and T70-029. 



The meeting was adjourned a 




00 



p.m 



i>rW J 




Rob€r/fc J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trusteed 




» 



I 



3391 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT AND 
UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

November 4, 1969, 12:30 p.m., Room 434, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Gordon, President Lederle; 

Trustees Croce, Troy; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Provost Tippo, Assistant Dean Gugin, UM/A; 

Chancellor Broderick, Mr. Cass, UM/B; 

Mrs. Hull. 

Chairman Gordon convened the session at 1:15 p.m. follow- 
ing luncheon. He requested Mr. Joseph Cass, Assistant Director of 
the Labor Center and Assistant to the President, to review legisla- 
tive prospects and problems for the current year. 

Mr. Cass said that this will be a difficult year for the 
Commonwealth financially. The Governor, in anticipation of the tight 
money situation, has asked for submission of two budgets; one a 
"hold- the- line" budget, and a second expanded one allowing for some 
new programs. The Governor will submit both, giving the Legislature 
the responsibility for raising the money for any new programs which 
they vote. Also, Mr. Cass said, the revenues from the cigarette tax 
will be totally inadequate to meet the UM/A, UM/B and UM/W capital 
outlay requests. 

Mr. Cass stressed the importance of the University of 
Massachusetts "speaking with one voice," and the necessity of co- 
ordination of effort and information by all groups on all campuses, 
student, faculty and alumni, on legislative matters in particular. 
In this connection he mentioned the importance of faculty and student 
making personal contacts with their state legislators - "getting to 
know them" - in order to better work out matters of mutual concern. 
He also noted the possibility of alumni groups setting up committees 
in the forty Senatorial districts for distribution of information. 

The problems involved in the admission policy for 1500 
additional students on the UM/ Amherst campus were next discussed. 
There was agreement that it would be desirable to go over this matter 
soon with the legislative leadership, emphasizing the necessity for 
increased funding in the operating budget area particularly, if the 
1500 additional students are to be accepted. 

President Lederle reviewed the University budgetary pro- 
cedures to date. The budget was filed as of September 15. It clear- 
ly differentiates between monies needed to support today's enrollments 
and the additional amount that will be needed if enrollment is to go 
ap by 1500. A subsequent "follow-up" discussion has been held with 
the Governor. 



Budgets 



Admission 

Policy 

1500 Additional 

Students 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Johnson reported that he has talked recently with 
Commissioner Donald Dwight who is unable at this date to say if 
support for the additional students will be forthcoming, or to 
furnish any firm budgetary figures. The revenue estimates for next 
year have not yet been firmed up, and there is the complicating 
fact that the BHE (using a different formula) has recommended higher 
budget figures than those submitted by the University. This infor- 
mation, however, is expected to be available in two to three weeks, 
according to Commissioner Dwight. 

Chairman Gordon commented that it was not too soon to 
start thinking in terms of the differences in "interim" budgets as 
prepared now, and those ,of a system. He also suggested the possi- 
bility of an appeal to the public for support of the University's 
programs particularly the 1500 new student admission policy. 

Dr. Croce felt that public sympathy to an appeal would 
certainly exist, but that any ensuing demand for increased legisla- 
tive support of public higher education would be offset by the in- 
evitable public demand for increased social benefits such as welfare 
and medicaid, with the resulting inability of the legislature to 
change basic apportionments. He also felt that not to take 1500 
additional students would be "demoralizing." 

Provost Tippo commented on the difficulties of faculty 
recruitment in this situation. He noted that faculty recruitment 
must start now if there is to be an increase in enrollment and that 
the peak of activity in this direction is traditionally around 
Christmas vacation when several professional societies hold their 
annual national conferences. Delay, he said, means losing the best 
people. Also tentative plans to go ahead could not be cut back 
without difficulty insofar as faculty recruitment is concerned, as 
a commitment would have been made. 

Treasurer Johnson expressed the hope that, if Commissioner 
Dwight is able to supply the specific budgetary information within 
two to three weeks as expected, there would still be time to map out 
a course of action. The Legislature, he said, recognizes the nec- 
sity for discussion of the problem within the University, but this 
internal debate should n<nt ready the press. 

Assistant Dean of Administration Gugin next reviewed 
legislation to be submitted at the upcoming session of the Legisla- 
ture either by the University, or at the suggestion of the Uni- 
versity. 

Dean Gugin also commented on the Board of Higher Educa- 
tion's R eport of the Task Force on Fiscal Responsbility of October 
18, 1969. He explained that this group had been created by the Ad- 
visory Commission to the BHE to formalize certain personnel and 
financial procedures common to all segments of public higher educa- 
tion in the Commonwealth. The Task Force Report creates guidelines 
clearing up misconceptions and allegations of abuses of fiscal 
autonomy made by individuals outside of public higher education. 



1 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It also formally defines the BHE as more explicitly a clearing 
house for channeling financial and personnel reports to the proper 
executive and legislative departments. 

Dean Gugin expects to present to the Board a finalized 
version of the attached legislation summary in December. 

Chairman Gordon suggested that responsible students be 
invited to sit in on sessions of this committee. There was general 
agreement that this would be desirable. 

The meeting adjourned at 2:05 p.m. 




RobertVJ. McCartney 
Secretary^ Board of Trusteed 



3393 






j 



3394 



COMMITTEE 



Alcoholic 

Beverage 

Regulation 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
November 4, 1969, 2:00 p.m., Room 434, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Lyons, President Lederle; 
Trustees Croce, Knowles, Rowland, 
Snowden, Troy; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Deans Brubacher, Field, 
Gugin, Dr. Hunt, Dr. Barron, Mrs. Mary L. 
Hubbard, Head of Residence, from the 
Student Senate, Mr. Balboni, Miss Olken, 
Mr. Thall, students: Misses Cranston, 
Harrington, Petrowsky, Pratt and Stein; 
Messrs. Gleason, Palomba, Riggotto and 
Saunders - all UM/A; Chancellor Broderick, 
UM/B; Mr. Austin Broadhurst, Counsel to 
the Board, and Mrs. Hull. 



Chairman Lyons convened the meeting at 2:15 p.m. The com- 
mittee then voted to go into executive session for consideration of 
the statement on the alcoholic beverages statutes with counsel, Mr. 
Austin Broadhurst. The executive session ended at 2:40 p.m. 

At 2:45 p.m., Chairman Lyons called the regular session 
to order with students and members of the University administration 
as guests. Mr. Broadhurst was also present. Discussion of the 
alcoholic beverages policy was first on the agenda. 

Provost Tippo introduced Mr. Broadhurst and asked him to 
summarize the policy statement being recommended to the Student 
Activities Committee of the Board of Trustees for its consideration 
and possible application on the University campuses. See Document 
T70-034. It is proposed that this policy in final form be recom- 
mended to the Board of Trustees and substituted for the present 
policy defined on page 69 of the Student Handbook, UM/ Amherst. 

Essentially, the new policy recites the alcoholic beverage 
statutes of the Commonwealth. It states that such statutes are 
binding upon University of Massachusetts students, and enforcement 
is placed in the hands of regular police agencies as is the case in 
all communities of citizens within the Commonwealth. Special condi- 
tions are prescribed for serving alcoholic beverages to groups of 
students of legal age. 

Mr. Bruce Balboni, Student Senate President, commented 
that the Student Senate proposal of September, 1969, would be 
largely in conformity with that proposed by the Board. 

There was general discussion of the problems involving 
consumption of alcohol on the Amherst campus. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Lederle pointed out that students object to 
"in loco parentis," but expect special immunity as students when 
they are apprehended for violations. Will the students now object 
if they are subject to the same state laws and penalties as they 
would be in any public place? 

Dean Field replied to the President's question: "Any 
misbehavior, whether assault, destruction of property, etc. which 
may result from misuse of alcohol remains as an offense with 
specific sanctions as they are given in the code of student conduct 

Mr. Broadhurst pointed out that, until now, there has 
been some interposition by the University between students "under 
the influence" and the law. The effect now is to remove this pro- 
tection. 

Dr. Croce asked if police now were notified when students 
were brought to the infirmary to recover from intoxication. Dean 
Field answered negatively. Dr. Croce noted that students would be 
disinclined to use the infirmary if the medical staff reported 
routine incidents of this sort to the police. 

Chairman Lyons next asked for discussion on the matter of 
dormitory open house regulations. 

Dean Field reviewed the action of the Board on September 
22, 1969 when it approved in principle the self-determination of 
dormitory visiting regulations but reserved final approval until 
security plans had been approved. Dean Field stated that the con- 
cern of the Board over security matters was a valid one as the Uni- 
versity is now "a small city" with minimal security. 

The present situation has come about through the action oi 
the Student Senate on October 29, 1969, in passing the following 
bills: 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
VOTED : That the Board of Trustees recognize the 
authority of the Student Government 
Association to set all social regulations 
pertaining to student life at UM/A. 

VOTED : Whereas, the Senate, in keeping with its 
open house stand of last Spring (S220 
'68-' 69), believes now, as it believed 
then, that Trustee regulation of the pri- 
vate lives of undergraduates in the area 
of residence hall visitation beyond the 
close of last year is unacceptable; and 

whereas, it would therefore be philosophically 
inconsistent, as well as unrealistic, useless 
and futile, for the Senate to seek to impose 
a policy which has not been functionally in 
effect since before the close of last year, 



3395 



Open 

House 

Regulations 



3396 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

upon a student body justifiably unwilling 
to submit to any continued Trustee enfringe- 
ment upon their private lives; and 

Whereas, it would be dishonest and hypo- 
critical for the student government to 
pretend that the 1968-69 visitation policy 
can, will, or should be enforced; and 

Whereas, the Senate in passing S306 made 
adequate provision to meet any genuine 
security questions that arise as a result 
of residence hall self-determination; 
therefore 



Be it resolved that the 
with stand of last year 
question, and other que 
social regulation of st 
and ought to be outside 
of the Board of Trustee 
to be exclusively the c 
and his elected governi 
advice and assistance o 
services; and 



Senate in keeping 
, consider that this 
stions relative to 
udents' lives, are 

of the jurisdiction 
s, and are and ought 
oncern of the student 
ng agencies, with the 
f student personnel 



Be it further resolved, that the Senate 
strongly urge that: no reprisals be taken 
by any agency against anyone or group exer- 
cising his long neglected right to lead his 
life as he will; and 

Be it further resolved that the Senate urge 
the administration to consider carefully 
the potentially disastrous consequences of 
any such retaliatory action, in terms of 
jeopardizing the continued harmonious work- 
ing relationship between the student body 
and the Board in the many areas of legiti- 
mately joint interest. 

Dean Field stated that he and other student personnel 
staff had urged continued dialogue rather than the confrontation 
position taken by the Senate. 

Mr. Balboni stated that while the statement adopted by the 
Board in September had seemed reasonable at the time, the situation 
had since changed; that many residences were operating in violation 
of the previously existing policies, and that there was "confusion" 
as to what policy was actually in effect. Mr. Balboni further 
stated that he had not had the executive power to make agreements 
with the Board of Trustees without further consultation with the 
Student Senate and that the Student Senate could not enforce Trustee 

policy if the policy is at variance with the strong feelings of 
students. 



COMMITTEE 



3391 



<y. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Irwin Thall, Chairman of the Student Matters Committeej, 
noted that a Visitation Proposal and a list of Recommendations were 
then being distributed to the Board, and that the wording in Sectior 
E, line 3, of the Visitation Proposal had been changed from "shall" 
to "may" (an earlier wording) . 

Provost Tippo then asked what specific plans for security 
had been presented. 

Mr. Thall replied that it had been unclear as to what the 
Board meant by "security." The students decided that they were 
probably expected to consider (1) damage to property, (2) unwanted 
visitors resulting from open house policies and (3) "pegged" (open) 
doors after lock-up hours. A system providing that each resident of 
a dormitory be given a front door key is being proposed to handle 
these problems. Other proposals have also been made. 

President Lederle commented that real security could not 
be established on campus with such a large number of keys in exis- 
tence. Mrs. Knowles, in this connection, raised the question of 
duplication of keys and asked how this could be prevented. 

Mrs. Snowden asked whose thinking specifically was repre- 
sented in these proposals, as it now seemed important to define 
this. Mr. Balboni replied that they had been passed by a majority 
of the Student Senate. Query was also made concerning who, 
specifically , is being designated when students use the term 
"administration." Response was made that the term usually applies 
to members of the staff attached to the Office of the Dean of Stu- 
dents . 

Chairman Lyons, in connection with the reference made by 
students to "confusion," noted that a conflict exists between the 
communication of late October 30 from James House stating "the ad- 
ministration is unable to make decision," and Dean Paul Brubacher's 
written and clear statement that the previous dormitory policies 
were still in effect. 

According to Mr. William Gleason, Head of Judiciary for 
James House, the Student Senate had announced to house governments 
that they were responsible to the Senate on open house matters and 
that page 22 of the Student Handbook 1969-1970, Student Room Visi - 
tation Policy , was no longer valid. 

Chairman Lyons stated that, in his opinion, Dean Brubacher 
had made a clear statement of policy. Furthermore, there is no 
possibility that the members of the Board of Trustees are divesting 
themselves of their responsibility under law for the buildings and 
the policies of the University. 

Provost Tippo asked Attorney Broadhurst to comment on the 
specific area of Board responsibilities for University regulations. 
Mr. Broadhurst replied that it is clearly the Board's responsibility 
to make regulations, although it can, if it wishes, delegate the 



3398 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

enforcement of some regulations. The Board, however, does not have 
the power to delegate the authority for making such regulations to 
another body (e.g. the Student Senate). 

The Board might, of course, choose not to make regula- 
tions in a given area. It would then be possible theoretically for 
students to do so, but the students would have no power of enforce- 
ment unless such power had been specifically delegated by the Board 
of Trustees. 

Mr. Paul Saunders of James House asked for clarification 
on this point, and it was stressed that -- even in a situation in 
which the Board might not have made regulations -- it would still 
have ultimate authority. Student government, it was also noted, 
could not look to the University for enforcement of their regula- 
tions unless they were adopted by the Board of Trustees. 

Trustee Rowland reviewed action taken by the committee at 
its meeting of September 8 when, after much consideration of student 
proposals, it was decided to recommend to the Board of Trustees 
acceptance of the open house and self-determination policies desired 
by the Student Senate. There was, Trustee Rowland said, clear under 
standing that the official regulations would continue in effect 
until final action was taken by the Board . Subsequently, at the 
special meeting of the Board of September 22, although there was 
not unanimous support by Trustees, the proposal carried u nder these 
assumptions . Further, it was understood at all meetings that Miss 
Beharry, Miss Olken and Mr. Balboni were acting as the duly elected 
officers and representatives of student government. Trustee Rowland 
expressed unhappiness with the student leadership and felt that 
there had been a serious breach of good faith. 

Chairman Lyoims made note of Mr. Balboni 's remarks as 
quoted in the Daily Collegian of November 4, 1969: "We will disobey 
the Board if they do not allow student governing bodies to pass our 
own social regulations." 

Mr. Balboni, in reply, stated that his responsibility was 
to the students and not to the Board of Trustees. He said that 
there had been "misunderstandings" but that he did not see this as 
a failure of leadership. The minutes of the Student Senate meeting 
of October 29, 1969 were then distributed for background information 

Trustee Troy questioned Student Senate procedures, asking 
if the Senate felt that it could act as a group totally independent 
of the University administration. 

It was brought out that in a conversation between Provost 
Tippo and Mr. Balboni, Provost Tippo had cautioned that the proposed 
action by the Student Senate could be unfortunate and untimely and 
would endanger the very goals that the students, administration and 
Trustees had been working for cooperatively. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Some Board members expressed concern that there had been 
a serious breach of faith on the part of the Student Senate officers 
Trustee Snowden suggested that instead of evidencing strong leader- 
ship, the officers may have been merely "following the followers." 
Trustee Rowland expressed her astonishment that the Senate had been 
unwilling to wait the short time involved (two weeks) until the 
Board had a chance to act at its meeting of November 14. President 
Lederle noted that it was a matter of the Student Government 
officers supporting the proposals they themselves had presented. 
Trustee Croce pointed out an apparent flaw in the mechanism of the 
Student Senate's operations; that if the elected officers, as dele- 
gates to the Board meetings, had not been fully authorized to act 
for the Senate, they should have so stated. 

President Lederle asked the Senate leaders how they would 
feel about a trustee-administration move to increase room rates to 
cover the cost of adequate security measures if this action was 
taken without prior consultation with the student body. President 
Balboni protested that such was not the pattern of the past. Presi- 
dent Lederle responded, "You can't have it both ways." The Presiden 
also noted that, prior to this meeting, no security plans had been 
received from the Student Government, although these had been re- 
quested in September. This is the reason the Trustees had not given 
final approval to the open house policy up to this time. 

Dean Field noted that an insufficient budget was the cause 
of "an incredibly inadequate security force." Trustee Rowland noted 
that this, of course, had been one of the prime concerns which the 
Board had in mind in its insistence on proper security measures. 

A statement drawn up by Mr. Paul R. Saunders of James 

House: Analysis of Dorm Living Conditions UM/A 1966-69 and together 

with Recommendations was distributed. Mr. Saunders introduced a 

group of dormitory residents who presented a point of view in oppo- 
sition to that of the Senate officers. 

Miss Harrington, head counsellor of Coolidge, T2, stated 
that she had been threatened by a group of intoxicated male students 
recently, after asking them to leave because of boisterous conduct. 

Trustee Rowland at this time assumed the chair from Chair- 
man Lyons who had to depart for his nightly telecast. She noted 
that she had also chaired the committee in September, and earlier, 
in the absence of Trustee Lyons when the present issues were under 
debate. Noting the impossibility of reviewing the security pro- 
posals and other material distributed at this meeting, Mrs. Rowland 
suggested sending further pertinent material, if any, to the Board 
in the interim period before November 14. Hopefully there will be 
time for review and consideration of all material before Board 
deliberations on that date. 

Louise Harrington, Head Counsellor for Coolidge Upper, 
said that a plan involving distribution of house keys to students 
had been voted down there unanimously as being unacceptable. She 



3399 



3400 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

also stated that damage in the dormitory was at an all-time high - 
$150 the preceding week; that girls on attendant desk duty were not 
safe from attack; and that drunkenness and resulting objectionable 
behavior was often uncontrollable. 

President Lederle asked if it was difficult to get identi 
fication from visitors. Miss Harrington replied that it was im- 
possible. 

There was discussion of the escort policy, with conflict- 
ing opinion. Mrs. Mary L. Hubbard, Head of Residence, James House, 
felt that the escort policy was totally ineffective as the residents 
"do not want to enforce it." 

Karen Pratt, President of Dwight House, stated that the 
escort policy worked well there and described other details of the 
Dwight House plan. There was agreement, however, that Dwight was a 
small dormitory with more of a sense of community than the larger 
residences have been able to create. 

Joan Petrowsky, Head of Judiciary, Coolidge House Upper, 
said that residents usually "would not write up violations of rules 
She also said that lock-up hours were ineffective as visitors could 
"hide" in rooms only to roam around later at will. 

Miss Olken, also a resident of Coolidge, admitted that 
"there is damage and security is poor," but that she "hadn't run 
into all this trouble on her floor." Miss Olken made the suggestion 
that perhaps dormitories could be locked earlier, possibly 10:00 p.ir 

Mrs. Knowles asked what, specifically, the Senate leaders 
present would do with individuals who were disruptive, who did not 
conform to accepted standards of behavior and what they would con- 
sider realistic and practical measures to protect young woman in 
dormitories under open house regulations. Mr. Balboni mentioned the 
possibility of sanctions or expelling offenders. 

Trustee Snowden submitted the opinion that "all the money 
in the world for security could not solve this problem until inter- 
nal controls were developed by the students themselves . " There was 
general agreement on this position. 

President Lederle reflected on the failure of students in 
general to enforce control of aberrant behavior in their dormitories 

Mr. Balboni said he had no wish to put the Senate in a 
position of confrontation. He would like to see a spirit of coopera- 
tion. 

Mrs. Snowden expressed concern that the Senate leaders 
seemed to be presenting only some restricted points of view. Mr. 
Balboni replied that they could only express what they felt was the 
majority point of view. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean Gugin questioned if this was the proper group of 
students to be addressing the Board of Trustees. He thought Mr. 
Balboni was saying that he did not presume to be presenting a truly 
representative point of view, from a broad base of opinion. He 
suggested that possibly President Balboni should offer to resign. 

Mr. Balboni replied - "This is an incorrect interpretatior 
I repeat, the Student Senate is the agency the Board should deal 
with." Mr. Balboni suggested that the only alternative would be 
dealing with the 52 house governments, which he felt would be 
unwieldly. 

Mr. Saunders noted that when presenting views, the oppos- 
ing body of opinion should not be overlooked. 

Chairman Rowland requested Mr. Saunders to review his 
proposals on security measures briefly. Mr. Saunders did so, and 
noted that no organized effort had been made by student government 
to work on security proposals during the year of experimental open 
house. 

Mr. Balboni at this point stated that he challenged the 
credentials of Mr. Saunders and his group. 

It was noted that three out of four residential areas had 
been in favor of deferring a vote on open house until after Board 
action. Mr. Balboni stated that the fourth area, Southwest, repre 
sented over half of the students. 

Secretary McCartney stressed the fact, that seemed to have 
been overlooked in some quarters, that approval of security plans 
was the responsibility of the Board and that this authority had not 
been delegated to students. 

The meeting adjourned at 5:15 p.m. 



3401 





Rotfeft J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 




3402 



COMMITTEE 



Married 
Student 
Housing 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
November 7, 1969, 10:30 a.m., Board Room, U of M, Amherst, Mass. 

PRESENT : Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Knowles and Maginnis; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Provost Tippo, Mr J . Littlefield, Mr. 

Meade, UM/A; Vice-Chancellor Hamilton, 
Mr. 0' Brien, UM/B; Dean Soutter, Mr. 
Stockwell, UM/W; Mr. Kay Alexander of 
Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay & Associates; 
Messrs. Taylor and Wakefield of 
Charles T. Main Company. 

Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 10:30 a.m. 

Before taking up the regular agenda, the Chairman asked Treasurer 

Johnson to review the matter of Married Student Housing taken up at 
earlier meetings. 

Treasurer Johnson noted the vote of the Board on October 
18, 1969 which proposed two alternative plans: (1) to lease pre- 
fabricated housing units on land owned by others, and if (1) does 
not prove feasible to (2) build, through the University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Authority modular-type units on University-owned 
land adjacent to the campus on North Pleasant Street. It is empha- 
sized that the University Building Authority has not taken any 
formal action in this matter at the present time. 

The Building Authority, Treasurer Johnson stated, has in- 
formally expressed preference for the second option: to build on 
University-owned land rather than to lease from private developers. 
Difficulties and complications were foreseen with a lease arrange- 
ment. 

It is now necessary to designate formally the 30 acres 
more or less of University-owned land situated on North Pleasant 
Street, between the Presidential Apartments and the Puffton Village 
Apartments, for this use. Using the type of modular unit contem- 
plated, the site can accommodate up to 350 units. 

It was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
30 acre tract, more or less, owned by the Uni- 
versity adjacent to and north of the campus in 
Amherst and situated on North Pleasant Street 
between the Presidential Apartments and the 
Puffton Village Apartments be designated as 
a site for the construction of married student 
housing. 



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I. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Haigis asked Planning Officer Littlef ield, UM/A, 
to describe the latest of the modular-type units under considera- 
tion for this project. Mr. Littlefield described these units, 
built by a New York state firm, with enthusiasm. A Model unit has 
been seen at the University of Connecticut. These units are built 
to the most exacting standards and meet every FHA requirement for 
quality, design and durability. The firm makes a 30year minimum 
guarantee. Wheels are temporarily attached to the units for trans- 
portation. On site the procedure is to place units on piers, after 
excavation with special equipment. The interior design places 
kitchen and bathroom in a "center box" with readily accessible 
plumbing; and living room and bedrooms at either end. The units 
are completely carpeted. The exterior design is very good, with 
Douglas fir siding and a cedar- shake mansard roof. The manu- 
facturer will give a firm quote: four 1-bedroom units for $34,100, 
and three 2-bedroom units for $32,000. Within two weeks after 
arrival of the basic units on site, the apartments are operational. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that the Authority will bid the 
project and other manufacturers will have the opportunity to pre- 
sent plans. 



3403 



Mr. Littlefield noted the necessity of a decision on the 
specific units to be built on the site before the site design can 
be done as the architects must know what type of unit they will be 
working with. As another point of interest, IBM has recently in- 
vested two million in these units; an indication of their quality. 

Trustee Knowles asked if the units were "stackable." Mr. 
Littlefield replied that although the firm is working on stackable 
units, their prime concern is with highest quality production. The 
quality differential is great between these units and other manu- 
facturer's stackable units. 

Chairman Haigis noted that the design is exceptional. It 
is expected that after bidding, possibly by December first, Trustee 
Pumphret would give a full report to the Board. 

President Lederle at this point left the meeting to make 
the welcoming speech for the Conference of Landscape Architects be- 
ing held on campus. 

Chairman Haigis asked Mr. Littlefield to present Agenda 
Item 1: Capital Outlay Program . 



Mr. Littlefield distributed the Fiscal 1971 Priority Capi- Capital 

tal Outlay listing of normal or regular requests, as distinguished Outlay 

from special requests. He detailed background information on indi- Program - 

vidual items and noted that the listing represents an interfiling Fiscal 1971 
of requests from UM/A, Um/B and Um/W as approved by President 
Lederle, and as it will be presented to the BHE. 



3404 



COMMITTEE 



Columbia 
Point - 
Land 
Acquisition 

Parcels 

F & H 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

A major factor in determining priorities has been the 
fact that, with a possible UM/A commitment to accept 1500 additional 
students yearly, planning now through 1974 is crucial. The square 
footage of academic space per student has already been reduced below 
desirable levels (200 square feet per student) and a Sasaki-Dawson 
analysis projects square footage per student down to 164 by Fall, 
'70. Construction, although significant, has not kept up with en- 
rollment, and temporary classrooms will be necessary at Amherst to 
meet this emergency situation. 

Mr. Littlefield noted that all of these capital outlay 

items were highly urgent and that the interfiling process had been 

painful. All of the items on the final list, for example, may not 
get into the Governor's budget recommendation. 

Vice-Chancellor Hamilton expressed concern that the tight- 
ness of the state budget might force the Governor to include only 
the top six priority items. He requested consideration of moving 
item eight, UM/B-2 & 3 - Equipment-Enro ll ment Expansion and "catch- 
Up" to the number five priority position. 

Chairman Haigis noted that expansion by some degree of the 
UM/B and UM/W capital outlay requests will be possible under the 
special capital outlay request, and that Amherst items are limited 
to normal capital outlay. 

It was pointed out that the UM/B equipment and enrollment 
expansion item is backed up by including it in the Operating Budget 
request for Fiscal 1971, whereas the UM/A items listed are being 
carried only in the capital budget request. 



Motion on this was tabled until President Lederle's 



return. 



Chairman Haigis next asked Vice-Chancellor Hamilton to 
present Agenda Item 2: L and Acquisition - Columbia Point . 
Chancellor Hamilton reviewed the meetings held over the past three 
weeks with himself, Chairman Healey and Mr. Horan concerning ac- 
quisition of the Boston College High School property. The quoted 
figures have proved so high that Chancellor Hamilton has asked the 
Attorney General to prepare an order of taking of the property: 
Parcels F and H at an award figure of $587,582. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 

in accordance with Chapter 898, Item 7490-0102 
of the Acts of 1969, and all other acts, 
authorizing the Trustees of the University to 
acquire land, or land with buildings thereon 
by purchase or by eminent domain under Chapter 
79 of the General Laws for the development of 
the University of Massachusetts at Columbia 
Point in the City of Boston; independent 



3405 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

appraisals having been made by qualified 
disinterested appraisers and filed with 
Vice-Chancellor William R. Hamilton, Jr., 
the Trustees of the University purchase 
or take by eminent domain in fee, two 
parcels of land supposed to be owned by 
the Boston College High School, situated 
adjacent to Savin Hill Cove in the City 
of Boston, and shown as Parcels (F) and 
(H) on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in 
Boston, (Dorchester) Mass.," surveyed by 
New England Survey Service, Inc., October 
6, 1969, Scale 1" = 200; and that the sum 
of $461,366 be and hereby is awarded as 
damages for Parcel (F) , and that the sum 
of $126,166 be and hereby is awarded as 
damages for Parcel (H) , and that Robert J. 
McCartney, Secretary, Board of Trustees, 
is hereby authorized to sign the order of 
taking for and in the name of the Board of 
Trustees . 

Vice-Chancellor Hamilton noted that Mr. Horan will ask 
for a commitment from the eventual owners of the property, within 
four months of the award, for purchase of the remainder of the 
property, with buildings. 

The next Agenda Item taken up was2.(b): Policy of Self- 
l iquidation of Certain F acilit i es - UM/B . Copies of a letter to 
Chairman Haigis from Chancellor Hamilton, dated November 5, 1969, 
were distributed. The specific item of concern was approval of the 
Board of inclusion of 50 hostel-type overnight accommodations in 
one of the colleges during the first phase of construction at the 
Columbia Point campus. These are needed, it was stated, as some 
(an estimated 57o) of the student body have a long commuting trip, 
and there are no overnight accommodations in the area. 

Several difficulties were noted during the course of the 
discussion: (1) UM/A commuting students might want the same type 
of facility, (2) legislation does not now allow combining both 
academic and non-academic functions in a building, (3) limited land 
space rules out the possible use of modular temporary units as an 
alternate plan, and (4) the general and long-standing concept of 
UM/B has been that of a commuter campus without any residential 
facilities . 

President Lederle, having returned to the meeting, ex- 
pressed the opinion that this would perhaps be a desirable thing to 
do, if it was clear that the project could be subsidized, and if 
there are differentials between UM/A and UM/B that would justify the 
plan. 



Hostels 

UM/B 



3406 



COMMITTEE 



Hamilton 

authorized 
to sign 



Fiscal 1971 
Priority 
U of M 
Capital 
Outlay 



Phase V - 
Master Plan 
Review - 
Columbia 
Point 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also noted that, with rapid transit facilities, 
students should have no difficulty getting to the down-town area, 
and that the possibility exists for motel development adjacent to 
the campus . 

Chairman Haigis, noting that the subject of hostel 
accommodations at UM/B was controversial at this point, suggested 
that the matter should be taken up later at a full Board meeting 
for further discussion. 

On a separate matter, that of cafeterias at UM/B, Vice- 
Chancellor Hamilton stated that with a noon meal only to be served, 
the cafeterias cannot be projected on a self-liquidating basis. 

Vice-Chancellor Hamilton noted that the Governor has 
agreed to appoint a special commission to study the rapid transit 
problem. The Commission will be funded from the Governor's budget. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
Vice-Chancellor William R. Hamilton, Jr. be 
designated by the Board of Trustees as the 
UM/Boston official empowered to approve pre- 
liminary plans and working documents related 
to UM/B construction projects for the Bureau 
of Building Construction. 

Returning to the Capital Outlay Program, Vice-Chancellor 
Hamilton restated his request to move Priority Item (8) up to (5), 
and explained that he had not previously had an opportunity to 
discuss this with the President. 

President Lederle expressed understanding, but said that 
the Amherst campus capital program would come to a halt unless the 
schedule is followed, and that unless UM/B could shift its own 
priorities as it had done last year, the priorities would stand as 
presented. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they accept and approve the Fiscal 1971 
priorities for University of Massachusetts 
Capital Outlay as detailed in Document 
T70-035. 

Chairman Haigis next introduced Mr. Kay Alexander of 
Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates, Inc., to present Agenda Item 2(a): 
Phase V of the Master Plan Review - Columbia Point. 



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340? 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Frank O'Brien of UM/B also presented the Messrs. 
Arthur Taylor and James Wakefield, representing the engineering 
firm of Charles T. Main, which has been selected by the Designer 
Selection Board for UM/B site development. 

Mr. Alexander, using charts and other visual aids, re- 
viewed the areas of (1) Land Use Concepts (2) Staging (3) Illustra- 
tive Site Planning - Artist's Conception and (4) Elevation at 60.0 
as now designed for the Columbia Point campus. 

Under (1), Land Use Concepts , Mr. Alexander reported that 
the preliminary findings of the soil consultants is optimistic. 
Borings show six types of foundation, and in some area buildings 
can probably be supported on normal foundations. It would appear 
that the rock base underlying the site is good, whereas some Boston 
sites have the problem of weathered rock. Mr. Alexander cautioned, 
however, that, "although the site on the whole looks very good, it 
is still a difficult one." 

President Lederle asked how the site compared with the 
Turnpike Air Rights Site. Mr. Alexander replied that the diffi- 
culties were similar; however, the Columbia Point site is five or 
six times larger than the Turnpike site. 

Mr. Alexander noted the expected problem of soil settle- 
ment and that this will occur at an incremental rate. (The Back 
Bay area, for example, is still settling.) However, this will be 
ground settling around buildings on a solid base, and time will be 
allowed for fill to settle before construction of buildings begins. 

The seawall, as described by Mr. Alexander, will be a 
rock-filled dike approximately 20 feet high, gradually sloping in- 
ward. He noted that the site is fairly inboard and that it would 
take a storm of enormous proportions to top the 20-foot seawall. 

On the question of utilities : Mr. Alexander stated that 
there is no major problem. There will be two water lines; 
electricity will enter from Morrissey Boulevard. All utilities will 
be underground, and although the utilities tunnel will not be a 
"walk-in" type, all ducts will be adjacent to the roads. 

The consultants in the area of environmental engineering 
have noted a major problem of air pollution at the site, Mr. 
Alexander said. The prevailing winds bring smoke from the Boston 
Edison plant across Columbia Point. There is some possibility, 
however, if UM/B uses all-electric power, that there would be an 
incentive for Boston Edison to take steps to reduce pollution. A 
meeting with the engineering firm and Boston Edison has been 
scheduled on this problem. 

In this connection, Vice-Chancellor Hamilton stated that 
the convergence of air pollutants over the site is combining with 
the air noise factor to create a major engineering problem. With a 
closed environmental design already dictated by the noise factor, - 
air conditioning is going to be necessary for all buildings. 



3408 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Turning to Parking , Mr. Alexander said that the new plans 
now being presented were essentially redrawings of plans seen on 
September 12. Approximately 777 parking spaces are planned for 
each college. 

Describing T raffic Circulation Patterns : Mr. Alexander 
noted the multi-level concept used in planning. He also pointed 
out the two pedestrian patterns: one a direct route planned within 
the limitations of a ten-minute interval between classes; another, 
"more meandering one" which will take advantage of the scenic views, 
etc. The central plaza is seen as the hub of student activity. 

At this point, the meeting adjourned for lunch in Hampden 
Dining Commons. 

The Chairman reconvened the session at 1:43 p.m. 

Mr. Alexander resumed his presentation with discussion of 
the basic movement system. A one-way loop is planned around the 
colleges, with visitor parking on the perimeters. The loop road is 
also seen as a "ceremonial entrance;" i.e. as providing access for 
the public to evening performances at the fine arts center and 
other public campus functions. Consideration is also being given 
to forming a "public edge" to the site, in this case a grassy hill 
at the Morrissey Boulevard entrance to the campus. There is an ex- 
cellent sea view from both the plaza and the seawall. 

The relationship of the seawall to the road, a point of 
some difficulty, has not yet been resolved, Mr. Alexander said. 
There is the possibility that a multi-level approach may be necea- •. 
sary. Incorporating a waterfront promenade is of great concern to 
the committee, it was noted. 

Chairman Haigis said that the committee would want to 
think about the seawall - road relationship before a final decision 
on this very important aspect of the total concept. 

It was agreed that there would be a presentation by 
Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates at the Board meeting of November 
14. Mr. Belluschi, however, cannot be present at that time because 
of a prior commitment. 

Future expansion at the Columbia Point Site was next 
discussed. The importance of drawings not being restricted to 
property already acquired, but showing planned expansion was 
stressed. Mr. Alexander agreed that future drawings would show 
expected expansion. 

Mr. Alexander noted that Savin Hill Cove was a good boat- 
ing area, and that the Fox Point Yacht Club was adjacent to the 
site . 

Mr. Hamilton recommended not taking the Yacht Club 
property, although UM/B is empowered to do so, but taking other 
land in the area for environmental purposes . 



F 



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B 



3409 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Haigis observed that there are no structures in 
the area under discussion, which is south of the site, and that it 
has great natural beauty. 

In regard to acquisition of land for future UM/B expansion, 
Vice-Chancellor Hamilton stated that there were strong pressures 
developing now by the City of Boston to place housing on the acreage 
just to the north of the University site. 

President Lederle asked if the psychology of the City was 
changing as to UM/B ownership of this property. 

The Vice-Chancllor replied that it would appear that the 
City has made a commitment to the Columbia Point Development 
Council to do anything within its power to make this land available 
for housing. 

The President observed that this went counter to the 
City's agreement that this land would be available for UM/B ex- 
pansion. There was general agreement to proceed as rapidly as 
possible with proceedings for acquisition of this land. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the administration be authorized to move 
forward as rapidly as possible with all pro- 
ceedings necessary for the acquisition of 
land situated north of the present University 
site at Columbia Point and presently owned by 
the City of Boston. 

Mrs. Knowles suggested showing aerial slides taken of the 
Columbia Point area at the next Board meeting, and it was agreed 
that this would be done. 

The Chairman next called for discussion of Agenda Item 3- 
Land Acquisition - Worcester. Treasurer Johnson reported that 
complications and delays involving acquisition of the Anderson 
property had necessitated an increase in price. Title to the 
property has now been assumed by the second mortgage holder and the 
agreed settlement price is $23,000. 

It was then moved, seconded ..and • 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees 

VOTED : That, in accordance with Chapter 847 Item 
8066-98 of the Acts of 1965, and all other 
acts, authorizing the Trustees of the Uni- 
versity to acquire land, or land with build- 
ings thereon, by purchase or by eminent 
domain under Chapter 79 of the General Laws, 
for the development of the University of 
Massachusetts Medical School in the City of 
Worcester; independent appraisals having been 
made by qualified disinterested appraisers 



Land 
Acquisition 

Worcester 



3410 



COMMITTEE 



Hodgkins 
Cove - 
Marine 
Science 
Base 



Student 
Housing 

UM/A 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and filed with Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer; 
that the Trustees of the University pmrchase 
or take by eminent domain in fee, the property 
formerly of Alan R. and Joan E. Anderson 
situated at 382 Plantation Street, in Worcester, 
Worcester County, Massachusetts and more particu- 
larly described in a deed recorded June 14, 1963 
at the Worcester District Registry of Deeds in 
Book 4377, pages 220 and 221, and that the pur- 
chase price for said property be Twenty Three 
Thousand ($23,000.00) Dollars, and that the 
conveyance be subject to the conditions and 
agreements as set forth in the option for the 
purchase of the said property signed by the 
present owner Benjamin Cohen, 80 Salisbury 
Street, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Dean Soutter next requested authorization to proceed with 
negotiations with the Sisters of Notre Dame for acquisition of some 
25 - 30 acres of property north of the Medical School. Authoriza- 
tion was granted. 

Noting a need to discuss details of coordination in the 
scheduling of construction with the BBC, Dean Soutter expressed 
hope that this could be arranged very shortly. He also said that 
the power plant estimate was $200,000 under the amount allowed, but 
that the bids are not yet in. It was agreed that separate pre- 
sentations would be given by the architects in December to review 
the latest changes (minor) in plans for the Medical Science Build- 
ing and the Hospital. 

Treasurer Johnson reviewed progress of Agenda Item 4 - 
Marine Science Base - Hodgkins Cove . The University of Massachusetts 
Foundation is willing to acquire the property under agreement with 
the Trustees, and details are now being worked out by Mr. Broadhurst. 
It is possible for the Foundation to proceed on the basis of assum- 
ing the mortgage on the property. The funds necessary for the 
transaction are available f rom interest derived from University of 
Massachusetts Trust Funds. Mr. Johnson will present the detailed 
procedures and figures relating to acquisition of this property to 
the full Board. 

The Treasurer next commented on student housing at UM/A. 
Noting that the Married Student Housing Plan is well on the way to 
solution, there remains the problem of housing single stmdents. 
Additional dormitory- ty/pe housing necessary to meet increased en- 
rollment will be required by 1971. Mr. Johnson cited the climbing 
cost of dormitory construction as having the result of "pricing 
ourselves out of the market." He foresees a possible $600 figure 
for rental of University suite-type rooms. He also noted that the 
cost of duplicating present buildings in the 1970 Dormitory Complex, 
if rebid in March, would show an increase of $1,000,000. Rents 
could go as high as $800 - $900. Dormitory fees, in any case, will 
have to go up drastically, due to the cost of retroactive pay for 
residence hall employees being higher than anticipated. 



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3411 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Johnson introduced for the committee's consideration 
a possible solution: The Scope Corporation, a subsidiary of Saga 
Food Corporation of California, is interested in building apartments 
in Amherst. Company executives are now visiting the campus and con- 
sidering the possibility of taking over the Fraternity-Sorority 
Park project which, unless additional houses are built there soon, 
will be a serious financial difficulty. The firm is interested in 
acquiring some 25 acres of undeveloped land adjacent to the campus; 
also in rebuilding areas adjacent to the Amherst campus used by 
the fraternities. They would build high-cost, luxury-type housing, 
with swimming pools, for faculty as well as students. If there was 
prompt Board action, the firm would have some housing available by 
1971. 

Provost Tippo noted that this seemed like "an interesting 
proposition," but that there would first have to be assurance that 
the University could rent all of its existing residence hall space. 

In further comments, Mr. Johnson said there was no possi- 
bility that the University could provide funds for the Fraternity- 
Sorority Park. He also pointed out the advantage of having the 
decaying area on North Pleasant Street and the main access route to 
the campus improved. If this action is taken, some 2000 students 
now living out of town could rent these apartments if they desired 
to do so and could afford them. 

The Scope Corporation is dependable, the Treasurer said. 
It is now successfully operating apartment complexes adjacent to 
several large campuses. The firm has a $500 million property in- 
vestment in various parts of the country. Scope operates on a 
"gentleman's agreement" that the University involved does not "pro- 
vide too much competition." The key to the operation, Mr. Johnson 
stated, is that the firm also operates dining concessions in con- 
junction with the apartment units. If the Board is interested, the 
details of the operation can be presented in mid-December. 

President Lederle raised the question of whether Scope 
buildings its own parking facilities. 

Trustee Maginnis expressed disapproval of the swimming 
pool aspect, thinking it might become troublesome. He also 
questioned whether the Scope Corporation would take over the 
Fraternity Park operation as a single project. The Treasurer re- 
plied that the firm was interested in the total package. 

Mr. Littlef ield, with student needs in mind, expressed 
reservations about the high price of the Scope apartments. He felt 
that Building Authority action would be the only way to keep costs 
down to levels realistic for students. General Maginnis responded 
that any private developer could buy this land for development. 



Scope 
Corporation 



3412 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Little fie Id asked for background information on the 
projected rentals of $800 - $900. Mr. Johnson replied that the 
determining factors were interest rates up to 7%7o, and escalation 
of construction costs. 

No formal action was taken on this matter at this time. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 



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Robert? J. McCartney 
Secretary/, Board of Tri, 




ees 



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34i : 



<jt 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

December 1, 1969, 10:00 a.m., Room 407, Statler Hilton 

Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT : Chairman Pumphret, President Lederle; 
Trustees Gordon, Knowles, Lambson; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney. 

ALSO 

PRESENT : Provost Tippo, Mr. Brand, Mr. Maus, 

Mrs. Hull, UM/A. From Standish, Ayer 

and Wood, Inc., Mr. Wood, Mr. Ladd. 

Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting at 10:20 a.m. 
Mr. Wood and Mr. Ladd of Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc., Investment 
Counselors, were present for the discussion of the first six items 
on the agenda, all dealing with investment matters. 

The first item, Report of Investment Counsel , included 
(a) the Portfolio Analysis, (b) the Operating Fund Analysis and 
(c) the Operating Fund Balance, as of October 31, 1969. Mr. Wood 
noted that the distribution of the portfolio is now at the desired 
ratio of approximately 337 bonds and 677° common stock. It is hoped 
to increase the investment position to 70% of equity which, Mr. 
Wood said, would be on a par with other universities. 

For the Operating Fund, Mr. Ladd noted that the rates on 
the short-term investments listed on page two of their report were 
substantially above bank rates, and recommended increased invest- 
ment holdings in these categories. Federal agencies were 
recommended as being the highest quality of the options available. 
It was pointed out that "instant interest" and savings accounts 
could be drawn down and invested at these higher yields to maximize 
income. 

In response to Trustee Pumphret' s question as to the 
amount of the current cash balance in the Amherst Bank, Associate 
Treasurer Brand replied that the balance is now at a higher than 
normal level, and there is a great deal of fluctuation in this 
account. Treasurer Johnson noted that -- had there not been cash 
reserves readily available which were not locked into an investment 
program -- a serious problem would have resulted from the unanti- 
cipated federal funds which came in erratically and the situation 
was further complicated by the state regulation requiring federal 
funds to go through the state treasury. However, Mr. Johnson said, 
when receipts are highest (in January and early February) extra 
funds could then be put into high yield investments rather than 
"instant interest" and savings accounts. 

There was next discussion of the $1,000,000 Certificate 
of Deposit which matures December 6, 1969 and the Ninety-Day Notice 
Accounts, as listed on the Operating Fund Balance as of October 31, 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 



Ninety-Day 

Notice 

Accounts 



3414 



COMMITTEE 



Athletic 
Special 
Reserve 
Fund 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

1969. It was noted that deposit of these accounts had been 
geographically distributed as an expression of the University's 
general interest in diverse Massachusetts communities. After exten- 
sive discussion, it was agreed to withdraw half of each deposit for 
investment, with the exception of the Amherst Savings Bank accounts, 
which are specialized. 

Chairman Pumphret next asked for discussion of Agenda Item 
Two: Investment of $100,000 of the Athletic Special Reserve Fund. 
After general discussion, motion was made, seconded, and it was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the Univer- 
sity, Kenneth W. Johnson, to use the 
Operating Fund and the Variable Interest 
Savings and Athletic Special Reserve of 
$100,000.00 account to purchase the 
Federal Agency Bonds listed below as 
recommended by Standi sh, Ayer and Wood, Inc. 

U.S. Treasury Bills 8.20 5/28/70 $350,000 



Federal Inter. Credit 8.75 
Federal Nat'l Mortgage 8.50 
Federal Home Loan 8.20 



It was also 



9/1/70 400,000 

7/12/71 300,000 

11/26/71 300,000 

$1,350,000 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the Univer- 
sity, Kenneth W. Johnson, to give official 
ninety-day notice to Savings Banks listed 
below that funds on deposit will be required 
by the University: 



Lynn Institution for Savings 

Provident Institution for Savings 

Springfield Five Cent Savings 

Woronoco Savings 

Bay State Savings 

Union Warren Savings 

Ware Savings 

Easthampton Savings 

East Cambridge Savings 

Amherst Savings 



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I 



$25 


,000 


15 


,000 


25 


,000 


25 


,000 


25 


,000 


25 


,000 


32 


,500 


35 


,000 


17 


,500 


25 


,000 



$250,000 



Regarding the Proposed Endowment Fund Changes, Mr. Wood 
said that these were essentially housekeeping "clean-up" procedures 
of various holdings. After further discussion and on motion made 
and seconded, it was 



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COMMITTEE 



a 



j 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the Univer- 
sity, Kenneth W. Johnson, to execute the 
changes in orders in the University's in- 
vestment portfolio as recommended by 
Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc. (Document 
T70-039). 



Common Stocks 



Sell 

300 shares 
100 shares 



Issue 



Approx. Market 
Price Value 



Clark Equipment (1.40) 
Westinghouse Electric (1.80) 



34 
59 



$10,200 

5,900 

$ 16,100 



Buy 

400 shares Aetna Life (1.40) 



40 $16,000 



II. Bonds 



Sell 



5M 



Buy 



So. Nat'l Gas 4 3/4 1/1/79 80 3/4 



5M American Tel. 4 3/8 5/1/99 63 



$3,230 



$3,150 



The third agenda item also involved sale of stock hold- 
Polymer Science and Engineering Department - sale of 30 
shares of Owens, Illinois, Inc. common stock, 10 shares of Inter- 



ings: 



national Paper Company common stock, 
motion made and seconded, it was 



After discussion and on 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the Univer- 
sity, Kenneth W. Johnson, to sell 30 shares 
of Owens, Illinois, Inc. and 10 shares of 
International Paper Company for the Polymer 
Science and Engineering Fund. 

Mr. Wood recommended establishment of a general Univer- 
sity policy that all gifts and bequests in the form of investment 
certificates would be sold. This procedure would save time and 
complications and should be applied whenever possible under terms 
of a gift or bequest. An affirmative vote could then be taken to 
retain a gift, if desired. 

It was then 



3415 



Proposed 
Endowment 
Fund 
Changes 



Polymer 
Science and 
Engineering 
Gift 



Gifts 

or 

Bequests 



3416 



COMMITTEE 



Helen S. 

Mitchell 

Endowment 

Fund - 

School of 

Home 

Economics 



Hampshire 

National 

Bank 



Revision - 
Stephen Davis 
Endowment 
Fund 



Blanket 
Crime 
Policy 



Cash 

Variance 

Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the Univer- 
sity, Kenneth W. Johnson, to sell at the 
time of receipt any current gifts of securi- 
ties and security rights except those that 
upon advice of Investment Counsel, Standish, 
Ayer and Wood, Inc. are recommended to the 
Trustees for retention. 

The Treasurer was asked to check on the possible sale of 
the Bartlett Tree Company stock. 

The Chairman next introduced Agenda Item Four: School of 
Home Economics - Sale of 100 shares of Westinghouse Electric Company 



r 



Common Stock . This stock was presented to the University on 
February 19, 1969 by Dr. Helen S. Mitchell for the purpose of 
establishing an endowment fund for the School of Home Economics. 
After discussion and upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
Acceptance of the gift by Dr. Helen S. 
Mitchell of 100 shares of Westinghouse 
Electric Corporation common stock for 
the purpose of establishment of an en- 
dowment fund - School of Home Economics - 
with rules and regulations for awarding 
grants and/or scholarships to be determined 
by a committee of the school. 

Re Agenda Item Five: Hampshire National Bank - Local Bank 



Interested in Working with the University , it was agreed after 
general discussion that no action would be taken on this matter at 
this time. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that a revision was necessary for 
the Stephen Davis Endowment Fund - Agenda Item Six. On motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the Stephen Davis Scholarship Fund, accepted 
by the Board of Trustees at its meeting of 
January 10, 1957, be revised by changing the 
scholarship specifications from one recipient 
to one or more recipients. 

Chairman Pumphret next introduced for discussion the 
Blanket Crime Policy Bond - Agenda Item Seven. The committee wished 
to have a more complete presentation from the bonding company justi- 
fying the proposed increase in the premium. It was agreed that 
action would be deferred until the chairman investigated this matter 
with experts in the field. 

Agenda Item Eight: Write Off Cash Variances - Amherst was 
next discussed by Mr. Johnson, and the audit presented. After 
discussion and upon motion made and seconded, it was 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
transfer of $60.61 from the Trust Fund In- 
terest Account be made to restore the 
shortage in the Amherst Petty Cash Fund 
Account for fiscal year 1969. 

Chairman Pumphret introduced the next item: Hodgkins 
Cove - Financing . The Treasurer presented for approval the agree- 



ment with the University of Massachusetts Foundation covering their 
purchase of the property for the benefit and use of the University' 
Marine Science Programs. A $15,000 expenditure now from Trust Fund 
Interest will be necessary, and an additional $10,000 to $15,000 will 
be needed yearly for the next five or six years for expenses under 
the agreement. Mr. Johnson noted that a citizen's group in 
Gloucester is anxious to raise funds for assistance in operation 
of this project, and it is hoped that this money can be used to 
match federal funds for laboratories and research. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
authorization of the expenditure of up to 
$15,000 from Trust Fund Interest pursuant 
to the proposed agreement with the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts Foundation, Inc. re 
Hodgkins Cove Property. 

The Chairman asked Secretary McCartney to report on the 
current situation in regard to Alumni Funds. The Secretary noted 
that the Alumni Office has been operating as an independent agency 
for the past ten years or so. Now, however, - looking to the 
future under a development or advancement program - agreement has 
been reached on the Alumni association moving into the University 
structure. The record-keeping and club activity function would be 
handled by the Alumni Office, but the Alumni Association would 
benefit from a tax-free status and greater giving by Alumni would 
be encouraged. It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the Treasurer be authorized to handle Alumni 
Funds as Trust Funds. 

Treasurer Johnson next commented on the State Audit - 
Waltham Field Station . Several exceptions were noted in the State 
Audit Report ( Number 695-250 ) and detailed in a complete report by 
the Treasurer, dated November 26, 1969. In particular, Mr. Johnson 
stated that the Waltham Field Station records, along with other 
official University records, are maintained on the Amherst campus 
and the accountant auditor and the first deputy auditor were so in- 
formed. There are no official financial records or accounts kept 
at Waltham. Employee time records are kept in accordance with the 
regulations as set forth by the State Comptroller. Associate 
Treasurer Brand exhibited a sample calendar page as kept for each 
employee along with a computer "print-out" of this material. 



341 



* 



Hodgkins 
Cove 



Alumni Funds 

Authorization 
to handle as 
Trust Funds 



Waltham 
Field 
Station - 
Auditor' s 
Report 

(Documents - 
T70-044 and 
T70-045) 



3418 



COMMITTEE 



Quarterly 
Report of 
the Treasurer 



Subsidiary 
Accounts 

UM/ Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The employee referred to on page five of the Auditor's 
Report was a highly qualified person employed in a consulting 
capacity. Payment should perhaps have been made as a flat consult- 
ing fee rather than on an hourly basis; but, in any case, the charge 
has been reasonable for the services performed. 

Mr. Johnson further noted that the telephone installation 
at Waltham is being studied by the University Procurement depart- 
ment. To date no evidence has been presented that a direct line 
would be less expensive, but if this proves to be the case, the 
appropriate change will be made immediately. 

It was also noted that the customary procedure of review 
with the department being audited had not been carried out by the 
State Auditors. Treasurer Johnson is filing a copy of his reply 
with the Commissioner of Administration and Finance and the auditor 
in charge at Amherst. 

Agenda Item 12 - The Quarterly Report of the Treasurer was 
next presented. (Document T70-046) 

Noting the many complexities involved in preparation of a 
meaningful analysis, Mr. Johnson outlined the main problem areas on 
pages 7 and 7A of his report. 

Chairman Pumphret noticed that UM/B salary expenditures 
were currently at a considerably higher percentage of the total 
allocation in these accounts than those of Amherst for the same 
period. It was agreed that UM/B was over- committed in this area. 
Mr. Maus pointed out the possibility that transfers could be made 
from other accounts. 

It was also agreed that appropriate footnotes should be 
added to the Treasurer's Report where necessary, in explanation of 
any unusual circumstances that would put some items out of line. 

Mr. Johnson called attention to certain transfers to be 
made at this time: at UM/ Amherst - to provide clothing and equip- 
ment for security guards; at UM/Worcester - funds for snow removal 
and for the cost of consultants. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
authorization be granted to the Treasurer 
to make the following transfers between sub- 
sidiary accounts at UM/ Amherst: 

From Account 09 to Account 05 - $2,000; also 

From Account 09 to Account 15 - $3,000 for the 

purpose of providing clothing and equipment for 
security guards. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



0! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
authorization be granted to the Treasurer 
to make the following transfers between 
subsidiary accounts at UM/Worcester : 

From Account 1350-38-01 to 1350-38-03 the 
sum of $30,000 to fund cost of consultants; 
also 

From Account 1350-38-13 to 1350-38-16 the 
sum of $2,500 to fund the cost of snow re- 
moval at the Shaw Building. 

The final agenda item: University Fund Expenditures for 
FY 1969 was reviewed without question. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:40 p.m. 



3419 



UM/Worcester 




Roberc/J. McCartney 
Secretary,/ Board of Trusted 



J 



3420 



COMMITTEE 



Legislative 
Report 



Alcoholic 
Beverages - 
Student 
Union and 
Campus Center 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

December 1, 1969, 12:30 p.m., Room 407, Statler Hilton Hotel, 

Boston, Mass. 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Healey, President Lederle; 
Trustees Boyden, Gordon, Lyons, 
Pumphret, Troy; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Dean Field, Dean Gugin, 
Mr. Grinnan, Mr. Myers, Mrs. Hull, UM/A. 
Chancellor Broderick, Mr. Cass, UM/B. 
From the senior class UM/A: Miss 
Goldstein, Messrs. Klein and Veale. 



The meeting was convened by Chairman Healey at 1:45 p.m. 
following luncheon. 

Mr. Cass, at the request of the Chairman, reported on 
current legislation. Five bills have been filed by the University: 
(1) a bill providing for a law school, (2) a two-step increase for 
meritorious non-professional employees, (3) shift differential for 
non-professional employees, (4) a police indemnification bill, and 
(5) a bill allowing recruitment of skilled non-professional em- 
ployees at above minimum step. 

Mr. Cass noted that bills filed by other organizations 
will be detailed later, among them: (1) a proposed 35-hour week for 
all state employees, (2) a reduction in the number of years necessary 
for sate employees to become vested in the state pension plan and 
(3) extension of the Building Authority to Boston and Worcester. 
Regarding (3) it was agreed that if this bill has not been sub- 
mitted by the Wednesday, December 3 deadline, it will be then sub- 
mitted by the Building Authority. 

In response to Trustee Lyon's question as to specific 
funding of the law school, it was brought out that this is a budget 
item but not included in the bill submitted to the Legislature. 

Chairman Healey asked President Lederle to comment on the 
first agenda item: Alcoholic Beverages - Student Union and Murray 
D. Lincoln Campus Center . 

President Lederle noted that this is a very complicated 
situation which has been under discussion informally for some time. 
There are two separate and distinct areas; one involving the Campus 
Center where it is desired to have alcoholic beverages available in 
connection with the dining facilities planned for conference use. 



I 



( 



] 



COMMITTEE 



] 



J 



3421 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

This is a financial factor of some importance in the operation of 
the Campus Center. The other area is the Student Union where it 
is planned to operate a Rathskeller at which students of legal age 
may buy beer. The President observed that the Rathskeller is the 
outgrowth of a nation-wide trend toward having this kind of opera- 
tion on campuses, and had first been proposed for the Amherst 
campus by a Faculty-Student Committee three years ago. 

What is needed at this time, the President said, is pre- 
liminary approval in principle in order to proceed with implementa 
tion. There are various legal and procedural hurdles to cross, the 
first of which is the granting of the license. This is now avail- 
able on a tentative basis but cannot be guaranteed at a later date. 
This would be a single license for both operations, and could be 
terminated at any time by the University. It will also be 
necessary to ask the University of Massachusetts Building Authority 
and the Alumni Building Association to approve this use of the 
buildings. 

Trustee Pumphret expressed strong objection to some 
aspects of the plan and was particularly concerned that the role 
and responsibilities of the Board of Trustees in this matter be 
recognized. He noted the possible dangers and risks involved in 
the plan, the possible legal consequences, and the fact that stu- 
dents might not be content with one campus location where beer 
would be available. 

Trustee Gordon expressed concern over the ultimate uses 
of the Campus Center Building. He pointed out that very sophisti- 
cated planning and control would be necessary. There would be 
differences between a group attending a campus conference or 
seminar and a group attending a convention, for instance, in terms 
of the interpretation of the regulations for use of the building. 
Trustee Gordon felt that a formal study should be made early in 
1970 on the total use concepts of the Campus Center. 

Trustee Troy asked how many state universities now allow 
alcoholic beverages to be sold on campus. Mr. Grinnan, Manager of 
the Campus Center, and Treasurer-Manager of the Top of the Campus , 
Inc . , the proposed holder of the license, said that he did not have 
figures immediately available but that he would report this at a 
later date. 

President Lederle stated that student participation was 
an important factor in the concept for the Campus Center from an 
economic standpoint and that students should have full opportunity 
for use of its facilities. 

After further discussion, and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 



3422 



COMMITTEE 



Honorary 
Degrees 

Student 
Participation 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
that the group, representing the Top of 
the Campus, Inc., be authorized to 
apply for a club liquor license, with 
the clear understanding that the Board 
of Trustees reserves the right to make 
all specific decisions as to where, 
when and whether or not liquor is 
actually to be served under this license. 

Chairman Healey noted that a student group would make a 
presentation on the next item on the agenda: Student Participation 
- Honorary Degree Candidates . Mr. David Veale, President of the 
Senior Class, Miss Ina Goldstein, Vice-President, and Mr. Richard 
Klein, a student member of the Commencement Task Force, were intro- 
duced. Chairman Healey expressed the willingness of the committee 
to listen to the student viewpoint on this matter. The Trustees, 
he noted, were all familiar with Mr. Veale' s letter of November 5, 
1969, calling for greater student participation in the handling of 
honorary degree and speaker nominations for Commencement. 

Mr. Veale restated the position of the letter, namely that 
the graduating class is the focal point of Commencement and should 
have a larger role in the selection of the speaker and the honorary 
degree candidates. The student proposal, he said, is to have the 
selection of these candidates determined by a Trustee sub-committee 
augmented by the President of the Senior Class, the President of 
the Graduate Student Senate and a representative of the Stockbridge 
graduating class. 

Trustee Lyons noted that the student body now submits 
nominations on the same basis as the faculty, alumni and Trustees. 
Two of this year's selections are student selections and a final 
choice last year between two candidates was made on the basis of 
one being a student selection. 

Miss Goldstein explained that students, in addition to 
making nominations, would like to be present for discussions to pre- 
sent the student point of view, which might differ from that of the 
Trustees. Mr. Veale said that the students do not wish the power 
of veto, merely more active participation. 

Chairman Healey, referring to recent misunderstandings as 
to whether students were acting as individuals or as representatives 
of a constituted student organization, asked if the student partici 
pants would have the power to commit their respective classes. Mr. 
Veale answered affirmatively. The Chairman also pointed out that 
this is a highly sensitive area where strict confidentiality is 
necessary. 

President Lederle expressed receptiveness to the student 
ideas. He also praised last year's student speaker and hoped that 
future Commencements, with greater student cooperation, would be 
even better than those of the past. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Healey thanked the student group for their in- 
terest and said that the Trustees would be happy to give serious 
consideration to their proposal. He noted, however, that changes 
could not now be made for Commencement, 1970. 

The committee then went into Executive Session for 
discussion of Implementation of the Reorganization Plan . 

The regular session adjourned at 3:00 p.m. 




3423 



Reorganization 
Plan 



J 



3424 



COMMITTEE 



WMUA - 
Request for 
Power 
Increase 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
December 8, 1969, 10:00 a.m., Room 411, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT : Chairman Lyons, President Lederle; 
Trustees Knowles, Plimpton, Rowland 
and Snowden; Secretary McCartney. 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Trustee Maginnis; Provost Tippo, Dean 
Field, Associate Dean Leheny, News 
Editor Mel ley, UM/A staff; Chief 
Justice Tirrell; President Olken, 
Secretary Beharry, Michael Macmillan, 
UM/A Student Senate; Mr. Stadlen, WMUA. 



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Lyons at 



10:15 a.m. 



One 



Secretary McCartney was invited to comment on Agenda Item 
WMUA - Request for Power Increase. 



r 



The Secretary reminded the committee that the question of 
a power increase for WMUA had been referred back to the University 
Broadcasting Council for further study and recommendation late last 
spring. In the interim an ad hoc committee has worked with the stu- 
dent leadership of WMUA to formulate an acceptable proposal for the 
Trustees. The essential new element in the proposal is that a pro- 
fessional tutor in the area of broadcasting program and management 
will be engaged by WMUA as a condition of its being granted permission 
by the Trustees to increase power to 1,000 watts. 

Additionally, the University Broadcasting Council felt 
that the Trustees should retain the license to the station, since it 
represents a most valuable property. It was pointed out that, even 
if the student radio station were completely independent of the 
University, it would still be associated with the institution in the 
public mind. 

News Editor Melley, a member of the Broadcasting Council, 
commented that Dartmouth and Yale now operate completely independent 
student radio stations, but this calls for much effort to sell ad- 
vertising in order to sustain operations. 

Extensive discussion followed. Trustee Plimpton was con- 
cerned about excessive "professionalism." He felt that WMUA was 
"at its best when au natural." President Lederle made it clear that 
the University did not wish to exercise censorship over the radio 
station in any form whatsoever. Discussion brought out the fact that: 
the University's curriculum in radio and television is not as ex- 
tensive as that in journalism. Differences between the WMUA program 
format and that of the Five College Radio Station, WFCR, were ex- 
plored. 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



3425 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In response to a query from Trustee Rowland as to whethei 
there would ever be a time when the five college students would 
unite to have a joint licensed station, Mr. Stadlen of WMUA ex- 
plained that cooperative arrangements might well materialize, but 
it is planned to use WMUA as a relay point and keep it strictly as 
a student station for the University of Massachusetts. 

Mr. Stadlen pointed out that WMUA has operated in a 
mature manner on the whole, and has served the University commu- 
nity-at-large in a beneficial manner in several recent crises in- 
cluding the "sit-in" at Whitmore last February. 

The President again raised the question of whether the 
student station would not be in a better position independent of 
the Trustees and the University. Mr. Stadlen responded that WMUA 
did not wish to make a change at this time; there is too much risk 
involved. The formation of a private corporation is a complicated 
process; also, there would probably need to be a transfer of owner- 
ship every time the officers of the Student Senate changed over. 
Additionally, the station might be forced to "go commercial" with 
all of the attendant problems of setting up an advertising staff 
to sell air time. 



After brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded 



and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the recommendation of the University Broad- 
casting Council that student radio station 
WMUA be granted permission to apply for an 
increase in power to 1,000 watts be granted, 
contingent upon the action of the station in 
securing the services of a tutor in broad- 
cast programming and management. 

At the invitation of Chairman Lyons, Miss Olken, Presi- 
dent of the Student Senate, presented Agenda Item Two - Revised 
Student Senate Constitution . 

Miss Olken observed that there had been no revision in 
the Constitution of the Student Senate since 1948. Provost Tippo 
added, however, that no reference appears to be available in Uni- 
versity files on this subject. 

The President inquired whether the draft of the constitu- 
tion had been reviewed by a lawyer. Miss Olken responded affirma- 
tively indicating that such assistance had been obtained from Pro- 
fessor Isidore Silver, chairman of the Student Communications Board 

On query from Trustee Knowles, it was brought out that 
membership in the Student Government Association is comprised of 
all undergraduate and Stockbridge School students. In order to be 



Student 

Senate 

Constitution 

revised 



3426 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

so classified, a student need only register in the University, but 
not necessarily attend class. Discussion of the proposed constitu- 
tion followed in depth. A summary of key questions raised, together 
with responses where appropriate, follows: 

Article II, section 2, paragraph 4 would give the Student 
Senate the right "to approve, to reject, or to suspend the constitu- 
tions of all undergraduate student organizations having or seeking 
University recognition, and to establish uniform financial and con- 
stitutional procedures for said groups;" 

Trustee Plimpton observed that, as written, the above paragraph 
"invites trouble down the line." The President queried what 
assurance the students would have that the Senate would not act 
arbitrarily. 

Mr. Macmillan responded that the Senate now has a Student Acti- 
vities Act, a Resident Hall Act, and is about to have a Student 
Government Act; therefore, much of the action of the Senate would 
not represent "an individual decision on our part." 

The President pointed out that certain areas of jurisdiction 
should be decentralized, while other powers should be granted to 
the Senate. "This," he said, "gets confusing in the draft." 

It was noted that the draft of the constitution appears to be 
overweighted in some areas and underweighted in others. 

The question of the Student Senate acting in a "federal" role 
was explored. Miss Olken agreed that it was possible to regard the 
residence halls as "states," but she pointed out that some issues 
require all-campus action. 

Provost Tippo raised the question of the status of the Student 
Union Governing Board. Miss Olken pointed out that this board now 
has a membership of approximately 20 students. The Student Senate 
now numbers 100. Thus, the Senate is more nearly representative of 
student opinion. She expressed disfavor with having splinter 
government groups. The Provost noted that it would be desirable to 
hear from the Student Union Governing Board on the constitutional 
question. 

The question of double jeopardy was raised under provisions of 
Article III, Section 8. Trustee Plimpton asked whether the students 
would regard as "double jeopardy" the exercise of university disci- 
pline after a student had been convicted in an outside court of law 
for an infraction such as, for example, wielding a knife against 
another student. Miss Olken responded that the intent of Section 8 
was to confine the double jeopardy concept to separate actions withih 
student courts. 



COMMITTEE 



3427 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The President pointed out that the law is clear: students are 
subject to two jurisdictions: (1) the outside courts and (2) the 
student judiciary. As "students push for more independence, they 
must, in the event of infractions of regulations and criminal codes, 
be increasingly prepared to face the outside courts," the President 
stated. 

Dean Field observed that the constitution appears to be out- 
dated before it even comes to the Board of Trustees. It was "old 
fashioned" in his view because it fails to take into account that 
one-third of the student population on the Amherst campus will con- 
sist of graduate students within a few years. 

Chairman Lyons noted that the draft constitution had not re- 
ceived full review by the Administration prior to coming before the 
committee. In consequence, it was agreed that today's session was 
informational in nature, and that the draft constitution should be 
returned to the Student Senate with the following recommendations: 

1. A statement should be incorporated which 
clearly sets forth that the Senate Consti- 
tution will operate in consonance with the 
laws of the Commonwealth and the By-laws 

and other regulations of the Board of Trustees. 

2. Language should be incorporated which sets 
forth the right of the President of the Uni- 
versity to overrule any action taken by the 
Student Senate. 

3. The proposed Constitution should be cleared 
with the University's Counsel. 

4. The proposed Constitution should be re- 
viewed by the Student Affairs Committee of 
the Faculty Senate. 

President Lederle raised the question of the "new look" in 
university governing bodies. Essentially, such groups consist of 
joint student-faculty-administration bodies. Miss Olken responded 
that the students were "looking into sucfoi a system." 

There was a brief digression from the agenda in order to 
discuss student participation in the process of selecting nominees 
for the presidency of the University of Massachusetts. 

Chairman Lyons called for Agenda Item three - Discussion 
on the Definition of Responsibility for Social Regulations Desired 
by the Student Body . Mr. Tirrell, Chief Justice of the Student 
Judiciary was invited to comment. He felt that the whole idea of a 
judicial system as operated in the past is the wrong way to approach 
the problem. Because of the thrust for student autonomy, he felt 
that the creation of Community Relations Boards would be a more ade- 
quate vehicle than has heretofore been available. We should be 



Discussion 
on the 
Definition 
of Responsi- 
bility for 
Social Regula- 
tions Desired 
by the Student 
Body 



3428 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

working to develop this system rather than a punitive process, he 
stated. 

A structure is envisioned, Mr. Tirrell continued, which 
would provide a Community Relations Board in each residence hall 
area with the development concurrently of a parallel judicial system 
to which cases can be referred if necessary. 

Miss Beharry added that she favors having the Community 
Relations Boards operate at the area level only, rather than 
necessarily in each separate residence hall. 

Extensive discussion followed during which it was brought 
out that leadership plays a strong role in making a house government 
either strong or weak; that it was important to "educate" entering 
freshmen in the processes of student governance as soon as possible 
after their arrival on campus; also, that (Mr. Tirrell) the ex- 
perience of "chaos" which most freshmen experience for a while after 
entering a residence hall situation may well be "one of the most 
important things in their education. In this way they learn respon 
sibility," he said. 

Chairman Lyons inquired whether the prime responsibility 
of the proposed Community Relations Boards would be to relate to 
freshmen and orient them into University life. Mr. Tirrell 
responded that this would be so to "the extent that freshmen say 
they need it." 

Mrs. Leheny, Associate Dean of Students, observed that she 
regards the proposed Community Relations Boards as a "fairly non- 
political structure." 



( NOTE TO TRUSTEES : A detailed description of the pro- 
posed Community Relations Boards is set forth in Section B of a 
MOTION on page 3 of Document T70-036 entitled Report of the Ad Hoc 
Committee on Dorm Autonomy , issued as supporting material for the 
Board of Trustees meeting of November 14, 1969). 



Trustee Snowden commented that, in order to avoid the 
"chaos" mentioned earlier by Mr. Tirrell, the Community Relations 
Boards might represent the best vehicle for change in an. orderly 
fashion. Miss Beharry responded that this was precisely what the 
students had in mind. "You have," she said, "a responsible govern- 
ment in a house along with a judiciary, but not all problems can be 
solved this way. So, this is where the Community Relations Boards 
would come in: to get objective helpful viewpoints." Mr. Tirrell 
added that the prime function of the Boards would be to demonstrate 
how to handle problems. 

Trustee Rowland observed that, in the entire business of 
student government, the present structure is out of date. She felt 
that the Student Senate may feel a little threatened in power by 



COMMITTEE 



3429 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the growth of house and area governments as well as Community Re- 
lations Boards. Specifically, Mrs. Rowland suggested that "a 
whole look be taken at what kind of government would be appro- 
priate." For example, is there a better way than having the Stu- 
dent Senate have "power down to the grass roots," etc.? Con- 
ceivably, it might be more statesmanlike for the Senate to operate 
as a "federal" body. 

Miss Olken responded that the Senate wishes to give the 
residence halls power. Mr. Tirrell added that, when the Senate 
approved the report on dormitory autonomy, it was agreed that the 
residence halls would have the ultimate power in terms of setting 
their own social regulations. 

Dean Field noted that the Student Senate has the power 
and has legislated judicial procedures for the residence halls, but 
the new, proposed constitution now "binds and boxes every dormi- 
tory." There is no mechanism, he said, by which any House can 
operate except by using this process. 

President Lederle stated that perhaps the entire judicial 
process might be improved by engaging one or more impartial and 
objective hearing officers who report neither to the Student Senate 
nor to the Administration. It would be the function of such offi- 
cers to adjudicate all infractions of regulations and impose penal 
ties where appropriate in an impartial manner. Mr. Tirrell 
responded that difficulties might arise when the action or viola- 
tion being considered as "not clear cut." The President responded 
that if involvement of peers were deemed crucial perhaps students 
should also be able to demand a jury trial before a hearing officei 

Mr. Tirrell commented that he sees the University as one 
of the few places left where it is still possible to experiment 
with the judicial process and not handle issues as either black or 
white. Mrs. Leheny observed that the University judicial process 
is obviously more successful at the higher level, proving that the 
cases which people really want prosecuted are generally referred 
upward for handling. 

The Provost pressed the students for a reaction to the 
hearing officer proposal. 

Mr. Tirrell responded that, obviously there should be 
some regulations with respect to thefts, etc.; but not all problems 
can be solved by a judiciary body. 

Chairman Lyons queried what other issues the students 
wished to identify and Miss Olken responded that clarification was 
needed on whether there should be house counselors or not; also, 
whether coed residence halls would be permitted to function on 
their own. 



3430 



COMMITTEE 



Birth 
Control 
Information 
Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was reported that operation of the approved, experi- 
mental coed residence hall program at Greenough House is expected 
to go into effect for the second semester (spring term, 1970). 
Other residence halls are working on proposals to be presented to 
the Board next March or April. 

Trustee Snowden commented that no Trustee can talk with 
18,000 students. She queried to what extent the students' opinions, 
as expressed at the meeting, reflect their own opinions rather than 
that of the broad spectrum of students. 

Trustee Maginnis, an observer at the meeting, commented 
on his impression that students were generally impatient with regard 
to what was, essentially, a major policy change (the Greenough 
House coed residence hall experiment) , whereas the Trustees have 
other outside responsibilities to parents, the public and the Legis- 
lature. 

Trustee Knowles said that the key problem is "how to get 
at the silent majority of students and protect their rights -- they 
are ruled by a small corps at the top." Miss Beharry responded that 
the silent group "has to rise by itself -- we can't get in there and 
dig." 

At the invitation of Provost Tippo, Senate President Olken 
described the next procedure of the Student Senate which may require 
Board approval. Miss Olken said that the Student Senate has appro- 
priated funds to set up a Birth Control Information Program. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:35 p.m. 





J. McCartney 
oard of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

December 8, 1969, 2:00 p.m., Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty, Inc. 
100 Boylston Street, Boston 



PRESENT: 



ALSO 
PRESENT: 



Chairman Haigis, President Lederle; 
Trustees Crowley, Knowles, Maginnis, 
Pumphret; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney. 



Provost Tippo, Dean Field, Dr. Zube, 
Mr. Littlefield, Mrs. Hull, UM/A. 
Chancellor Broderick, Vice-Chancellor 
Hamilton, Messrs. O'Brien, Prince, 
Dean Gagnon, Professor Weaver, UM/B. 
Dean Soutter, Mr. Stockwell, UM/W. 
From Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty, Inc. 
Messrs. Aldrich, Mendell. From Ritchie 
Associates, Mr. Peter Moyes . 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 2:00 p.m. On 
display was a sample of the gray stone facing for the hospital 
facade. This material is to be attached to the concrete exterior 
walls of the hospital and will greatly enhance the very functional 
design of the building. 

A detailed model of the power plant for the Medical School 
was also on view. Mr. Nelson Aldrich pointed out some of the 
features of this very handsome building as dramatically displayed 
in the model which was complete with interior lighting and an opera 
ting blower system. The exterior walls are to be very dark, almost 
black, aluminum siding. The smoke stack is to be constructed of 
self-rusting steel which weathers to a rich dark red patina. 

Mr. Mendell pointed out the basic relationships of the 
buildings within the site plan. The power plant is located approxi- 
mately 200 feet from the lake on the perimeter of the site, with the 
other buildings more centrally located. All buildings are connected 
by a system of tunnels. The excavation for the power plant, it was 
noted, is now 957o complete. 

Mrs. Knowles questioned the possibility of heat absorption 
by the black walls of the power plant. Mr. Mendell explained that 
this is essentially an "open" building with a great deal of air 
circulation and that so much heat will be generated by the equipment 
that any absorption from outside sources would be negligible. 

President Lederle asked what provision had been made for 
expansion of the Medical School buildings to include dental and 
nursing schools, and eventual university status. Expansion plans 
were detailed; for instance, some walls are demountable and the 
elevator penthouses are designed for added building height. The 
power plant is also designed for expansion. 



3431 



Medical 
School - 
Architecture 



Power 
Plant 



3432 



COMMITTEE 



All-weather 
Track 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean Soutter pointed out that the air pollution problem 
has been handled to the satisfaction of the town of Shrewsbury. 
The heating system will be gas, backed up by sulphur- free oil. 
Vapor will be ejected by force. 

General and enthusiastic approval of the power plant de- 
sign was expressed, with Trustee Knowles dissenting. Mrs. Knowles 
felt that the exterior was too dark. It was agreed that she will 
be consulted when final choice of color is made. 

On motion then made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the plans for the power plant for the 
Medical School as presented by the archi- 
tectural firm of Campbell, Aldrich and 
Nulty, Inc., be accepted, with possible 
reservation as to color of the exterior 
of the building. 

Dean Soutter discussed the possibility of another delay 
in Medical School construction if the BBC extends construction 
deadlines. The Dean stressed, as he has on other occasions, the 
necessity of Shaw building occupancy by July 1. After general 
discussion, it was agreed that a Buildings and Grounds Committee 
meeting would be held in January to review further plans with the 
architects as soon as these are ready for presentation. It was also 
noted that occupancy date is a part of the contract. It was agreed 
that everything possible would be done by the Board to guarantee 
completion of the Medical School facilities by the target date of 
July 1, 1972. 

The teaching hospital elevations were presented by Mr. 
Moyes, showing patient, emergency and service entrances, location 
and height of windows, and corrections in location of partitions. 
Mr. Belluschi has seen the exterior plans and termed them "excellent 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
acceptance of the exterior design of 
the teaching hospital as presented at 
this time by the architectural firms 
of Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty, Inc. 
and Ritchie Associates. 

Chairman Haigis next reviewed the situation on the all- 
weather track. Three bids have been submitted to the BBC, only one 
of which - the highest - meets specifications. This higher bid is 
for installation of Tartan Track, manufactured by Minnesota Mining 
Company. This material is used on all major tracks and is 
apparently the only one available which meets rigid specifications. 
It was agreed to urge BBC acceptance of this higher bid. 



f 



COMMITTEE 



3433 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Building Program - UM/Boston was next discussed by 
Chancellor Broderick, Vice-chancellor Hamilton and Mr. O'Brien. 

A formal announcement of the six architects selected by tthe 
Designer Selection Board for the six buildings in Phase I - UM/B 
Campus is expected momentarily. Chancellor Broderick said that 
space allocations and budget specifications for three of the six 
buildings were ready for presentation and, hopefully, approval at 
this time. Space requirements for the other three buildings have 
not yet been agreed upon. 

Mr. O'Brien distributed detailed sets of the space and 
budget requirements and allocations for the library, administration 
and central supply buildings. (Documents T70-038 and T70-041) 
Chairman Haigis noted the volume of this material and the importance 
of such material being submitted to the Trustees well in advance of 
meetings. 

There was full and general discussion of this aspect of 
UM/B campus planning, during which several questions were raised 
and answered. The allocation of four rooms for use of class offi- 
cers was mentioned. Mr. O'Brien said that attempts had been made 
to be generous with student requests for space. Requests for space 
allocations had been handled, Mr. O'Brien said, by a Faculty Senate 
Committee. In response to President Lederle's question as to the 
square footage allotment per student, Chancellor Broderick stated 
that in the initial planning stage this had been more than 200 
square feet per student, although now somewhat below that estimate. 
There was general discussion of the use of library space with 
President Lederle noting that the building was planned for a pro- 
jected student enrollment of 15,000 and that library space should 
be fully utilized in the interim period. The Edward Durrell Stone 
library in Amherst, the President said, is planned so that space 
can be used for offices until such time as the shelves are fully 
stocked with books. 

Mr. Johnson suggested, in this connection, that only the 
policy questions should be resolved now with details to bear close 
scrutiny at a later date when preliminary plans are submitted by 
the architects. Basically, Mr. Johnson felt, the policy decisions 
now are the dual use of buildings in early stages, adherence to 
the standard of about 200 feet of academic space per student for 
total campus and determination of all space requirements within the 
framework of cost. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees 
approval of the space and budget allo- 
cations as submitted for the UM/Boston 
campus, Documents T70-038, T70-040, and 
T70-041, providing that multiple use of 
the library is planned and that progress 
is kept consonant with cost. 



UM/Boston 

Building 

Program 



3434 



COMMITTEE 



Single 
Student 
Housing - 
1971 - UM/A 



Feasibility 
Study - 
Future 
Housing 

UM/Amherst 



Policy on 
Occupancy 
and Rental 
Rates - 
Lincoln and 
University 
Apartments - 
Amherst 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Johnson next reviewed the second agenda item - Single 
Student Housing for 1971 - UM/Amherst . The 1970 dormitories are on 
schedule. The increasingly prohibitive costs of construction and 
financing, however, has forced the conclusion that further dormitory 
construction at this time is not economically feasible. An unavoid- 
able increase in student fees will shortly be sought and, in order 
to keep these fees at the lowest possible rates, there will be some 
planned tripling of room occupancies, with announcement of this con- 
tingency in advance. A room deposit will also be required. This 
situation, Mr. Johnson pointed out, is duplicated at most other 
major state universities. There is also the possibility that stu- 
dents may be required when admitted, to sign a statement agreeing to 
live in university housing if this proves necessary to assure full 
dormitory occupancy. 

Mr. Johnson discussed the third agenda item - Feasibility 
Study for Future Student Housing - UM/Amherst . The firm of Sasaki, 
Dawson, DeMay Associates, Inc. is willing to undertake a study that 
would include a survey of all possible types, sizes and locations 
of both single and married student housing, as well as land-use con- 
cepts in areas abutting the University and asjacent areas including 
the North Pleasant Street and Phillips Street area, and Fraternity- 
Sorority Park property on East Pleasant Street. All appropriate 
segments of the University and the Town Planning committees will be 
consulted and kept informed. The firm agrees to complete this 
project within the next three months, reporting by April 1, 1970. 
Cost projections and financing will be included in the study. 
Mr. Johnson recommended that this study be undertaken. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

the firm of Sasaki, Dawson, DeMay Associates, 
Inc. be retained for purposes of conducting 
a Feasibility Study for Euture Student 
Housing - UM/Amherst. 

Mr. Littlefield, UM/A Planning Officer, said that he would 
present at the next meeting of the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds two feasibility studies: (1) the Infirmary addition and 
(2) the Mathematics-Physics Building, (Phase II of the Graduate Re- 
search Center) . 

Mr. Johnson next discussed the Policy on Occupancy and 
Rental Rates on Lincoln and University Apartments - UM/Amherst . 
This matter was presented to alert the committee to a proposed chang|e 
in policy on these rental units. Mr. Johnson noted that these 
apartments for faculty and staff occupancy had been built by the 
University of Massachusetts Building Association under the old 
system, with fees going into the State Treasury. As the number of 
units available is not now practical in terms of increased faculty, 
Mr. Johnson is studying making these apartments available primarily 
to married students, with rates comparable to those for the newer 



1 



COMMITTEE 



o 



j 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

units recently approved for construction by the Building Authority 
It will be recommended to establish the income as trust funds and 
to set up a professionally staffed married student housing office. 
Mr. Broadhurst concurs in this arrangement under Chapter 75 of the 
General Laws. Details of this proposal will be presented for 
action at a later meeting. 

Provost Tippo recommended acceptance of the request of 
Language Department Heads that the Language Laboratories be named 
in memory of James Butler, who had been personally responsible for 
the design and operation of this outstanding campus facility. 
Students, upon learning of his untimely death, have contributed to 
a fund intended for a plaque in his memory. His name on the 
Language Laboratories would honor this relationship of a man who 
devoted his life to the service of the University in its facili- 
ties, its faculty and its students. 



and 



On motion made and seconded, it was then moved, seconded 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
the Language Laboratories at UM/ Amherst 
be named in memory of James Butler. 



The meeting was adjourned at 4:30 p.m. 




3435 



Language 
Laboratories 

in memory of 
James Butler 



Secreta, 



3436 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I 




alk 



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